La Marmotte

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by MartinM, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Just registered for this ride on www.sportcommunication.com

    What have I done? it was enough of a task to drive up Galibier last
    year. I do intend to ride AdH at the end despite saying "never again"
     
    Tags:


  2. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

  3. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > > Just registered for this ride on www.sportcommunication.com
    > >

    >
    > Go for it! It's excellent.
    >
    > Here's my report of my ride in 2004:


    read it thanks; very inspiring.
    on a practical note, how do the other climbs compare with Huez (having
    only done the latter)?
     
  4. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    >
    > read it thanks; very inspiring.
    > on a practical note, how do the other climbs compare with Huez (having
    > only done the latter)?


    Croix du Fer is just very, very long, and the descents where the road slip
    break your rythm. Mind, the bits were it climbs back up to regain the old
    road after said small descents are pretty steep.

    The Telegraph/Galabier is hard. The top of the Galabier is steep enough
    to hurt and high enough that most people will notice the lack of oxygen.

    L'Alp just hurts because of where it comes in the ride :)

    It's very hard to sensibly compare 40km of the Croix du Fer done when
    fresh at the start with 15km of L'Alp at the end. The main thing is
    to take it easy until near the top of the Galabier.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  5. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > >
    > > read it thanks; very inspiring.
    > > on a practical note, how do the other climbs compare with Huez (having
    > > only done the latter)?

    >
    > Croix du Fer is just very, very long, and the descents where the road slip
    > break your rythm. Mind, the bits were it climbs back up to regain the old
    > road after said small descents are pretty steep.
    >
    > The Telegraph/Galabier is hard. The top of the Galabier is steep enough
    > to hurt and high enough that most people will notice the lack of oxygen.
    >
    > L'Alp just hurts because of where it comes in the ride :)
    >
    > It's very hard to sensibly compare 40km of the Croix du Fer done when
    > fresh at the start with 15km of L'Alp at the end. The main thing is
    > to take it easy until near the top of the Galabier.


    thanks; will do. I intend to do more training for it than last year. A
    Mr Supremo could well help in that quest.
     
  6. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > >
    > > read it thanks; very inspiring.
    > > on a practical note, how do the other climbs compare with Huez (having
    > > only done the latter)?

    >
    > Croix du Fer is just very, very long, and the descents where the road slip
    > break your rythm. Mind, the bits were it climbs back up to regain the old
    > road after said small descents are pretty steep.
    >
    > The Telegraph/Galabier is hard. The top of the Galabier is steep enough
    > to hurt and high enough that most people will notice the lack of oxygen.
    >
    > L'Alp just hurts because of where it comes in the ride :)
    >
    > It's very hard to sensibly compare 40km of the Croix du Fer done when
    > fresh at the start with 15km of L'Alp at the end. The main thing is
    > to take it easy until near the top of the Galabier.


    thanks; will do. I intend to do more training for it than last year. A
    Mr Supremo could well help in that quest.
     
  7. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    >
    > thanks; will do. I intend to do more training for it than last year. A
    > Mr Supremo could well help in that quest.


    Maybe. For my money AUK events, while fun, aren't necessarily that useful
    as training for something like the Marmotte. For starters, they have cafe
    stops in.

    Events like the Dales Grimpeur 200km (4AAA) are good training, though
    not as hard as the Marmotte. I would look up how much climbing it has
    (4000m?) but AUK in its wisdom has decided that you have to be a member
    to look that far ahead.

    Also get some speed work in. You'll be climbing for several hours, and
    working hard while doing it some some shorter fast rides are good for
    this (say 10 or 25 mile TT's, idealy on a sporting course)

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  8. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > >
    > > thanks; will do. I intend to do more training for it than last year. A
    > > Mr Supremo could well help in that quest.

    >
    > Maybe. For my money AUK events, while fun, aren't necessarily that useful
    > as training for something like the Marmotte. For starters, they have cafe
    > stops in.
    >
    > Events like the Dales Grimpeur 200km (4AAA) are good training, though
    > not as hard as the Marmotte. I would look up how much climbing it has
    > (4000m?) but AUK in its wisdom has decided that you have to be a member
    > to look that far ahead.
    >
    > Also get some speed work in. You'll be climbing for several hours, and
    > working hard while doing it some some shorter fast rides are good for
    > this (say 10 or 25 mile TT's, idealy on a sporting course)


    Thanks, will do (but just on the courses not in actual TT's, not a time
    I wish to revisit) I have some fellow cycling commuters who are being
    thrown off the train as well who go a lot faster than AUK speed.

    BTW AUK events are visible to the general public just by clicking on
    the month letter.
     
  9. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:



    > Events like the Dales Grimpeur 200km (4AAA) are good training, though
    > not as hard as the Marmotte. I would look up how much climbing it has
    > (4000m?) but AUK in its wisdom has decided that you have to be a member
    > to look that far ahead.


    Starting from: Pateley Bridge
    Date: Saturday 3rd June 2006 Time: 08:00 Distance: 215 km

    AAA: 4.5 Climbing: 4596m

    looks good, will try to get up there
     
  10. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > Also get some speed work in. You'll be climbing for several hours, and
    > working hard while doing it some some shorter fast rides are good for
    > this (say 10 or 25 mile TT's, idealy on a sporting course)


    I found moderate application of intervals to make a considerable
    difference to my overall fitness. Basically, in a 90mins or so evening
    ride I'd warm up for 5-10 miles (gets me to the nice open flat quiet
    roads) and then (using an HRM though alternatives exist) either pick a
    couple of points about 200m apart or use a stopwatch or use a sheer
    'hit the wall' method, start at point A and sprint like mad, no gear
    changing, no easing up, absolute eyeballs out for the duration
    (typically about ten secs) then back to really gentle till the HR drops
    to a steady state level (in my case I use a cutoff of 140bpm - works
    for me but you will be different) and repeat. And repeat And repeat.
    Then another 5 miles of moderate pace before repeating the set. If you
    can then manage a third set you are quite fit;-)
    This is not a substitute for all other training and should only be
    attempted by those who know they are not at risk of sudden heart
    problems, and in short doses throughout the season.

    Alternatives: find a hill (doesn't have to be big, just steady) that
    takes about 5 mins to ride up at a good pace and treat that as an
    'interval', riding up as hard as you can without blowing up then coming
    back to it and repeating several times. My local hill (Dundee Law) is
    good for this, about 750 m with 75m height gain to climb with a
    recovery loop of returning down the hill and riding round it for about
    2k before repeating. On the MTB it takes about 7-8 mins per lap
    according to the chavs who timed me one evening and pointed out that I
    had taken longer the second time (ie between the second and third
    times) than the first. Then again they seemed impressed that anyone
    could even do it once. My rules are no stopping. If I have to stop to
    put a foot down I go home.

    The third alternative is the big climb - find a climb of 20-30 mins and
    ride it once.
    A colleague in Norway used to ride up Holmenkollen twice a day - about
    400m climb - which was very much at the top end of that. Ouch.

    And the long gentle rides at the weekends to get the miles (and cakes)
    in..

    ...d
     
  11. davek

    davek Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > Events like the Dales Grimpeur 200km (4AAA) are good training, though
    > not as hard as the Marmotte. I would look up how much climbing it has
    > (4000m?)


    4596 metres, 4.5 points

    but AUK in its wisdom has decided that you have to be a member
    > to look that far ahead.


    True, but if you google for "dales grimpeur 200 site:audax.uk.net" you
    get taken directly to the info page, bypassing the login.

    Or you can just follow this link:
    http://www.audax.uk.net/cal/calsolo.php?Ride=287

    d.
     
  12. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    >
    > Starting from: Pateley Bridge
    > Date: Saturday 3rd June 2006 Time: 08:00 Distance: 215 km


    I should be there - let me know if you go and I'll say hi!

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  13. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > >
    > > Starting from: Pateley Bridge
    > > Date: Saturday 3rd June 2006 Time: 08:00 Distance: 215 km

    >
    > I should be there - let me know if you go and I'll say hi!
    >
    > Arthur
    >
    > --
    > Arthur Clune


    DO NOT COUNT ME IN !!!!! I think I'm washing my hair that weekend.
     
  14. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Thanks; all sounds very complicated but will try. I did L'Ardechoise
    last year with no real training, I found the hills almost all very easy
    compared to over here, was only caught out by the heat and my own
    unfitness, however the Alps are much much steeper so just doing audax
    pace will not do. I do have a very good local hill up to Ashdown Forest
    which I can do at least twice a week when the evenings get longer, plus
    will be going into work over the north downs which has a couple of
    short sharp shocks.
     
  15. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    > Arthur Clune wrote:
    > > MartinM wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Starting from: Pateley Bridge
    > > > Date: Saturday 3rd June 2006 Time: 08:00 Distance: 215 km

    > >
    > > I should be there - let me know if you go and I'll say hi!
    > >
    > > Arthur
    > >
    > > --
    > > Arthur Clune

    >
    > DO NOT COUNT ME IN !!!!! I think I'm washing my hair that weekend.


    did you do it last year? I see there is also a Tavistock one that
    weekend which _may_ be easier to get to.
     
  16. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    >
    > DO NOT COUNT ME IN !!!!! I think I'm washing my hair that weekend.
    >


    Why every not? Your stomping ground isn't it?

    It really is a beautiful ride.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  17. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    > MSeries wrote:
    >
    >>Arthur Clune wrote:
    >>
    >>>MartinM wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Starting from: Pateley Bridge
    >>>>Date: Saturday 3rd June 2006 Time: 08:00 Distance: 215 km
    >>>
    >>>I should be there - let me know if you go and I'll say hi!
    >>>
    >>>Arthur
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>Arthur Clune

    >>
    >>DO NOT COUNT ME IN !!!!! I think I'm washing my hair that weekend.

    >
    >
    > did you do it last year? I see there is also a Tavistock one that
    > weekend which _may_ be easier to get to.
    >


    No
     
  18. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MSeries wrote:
    >
    >>DO NOT COUNT ME IN !!!!! I think I'm washing my hair that weekend.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Why every not? Your stomping ground isn't it?
    >
    > It really is a beautiful ride.
    >
    > Arthur
    >

    Pately Bridge isn't *that* close to Morley, though I have been know to
    travel further for a 200km randonee. Its those bloody hills, too savage
    for me, I prefer the long Pennine drags, which IMO are more similar to
    the Alps than the short sharp hillettes in the Dales. Anyway I'll be
    having an easy weekend that one after 300s and 400s throughout May.
     
  19. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    > Arthur Clune wrote:
    > > MSeries wrote:
    > >
    > >>DO NOT COUNT ME IN !!!!! I think I'm washing my hair that weekend.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > Why every not? Your stomping ground isn't it?
    > >
    > > It really is a beautiful ride.
    > >
    > > Arthur
    > >

    > Pately Bridge isn't *that* close to Morley, though I have been know to
    > travel further for a 200km randonee. Its those bloody hills, too savage
    > for me, I prefer the long Pennine drags, which IMO are more similar to
    > the Alps than the short sharp hillettes in the Dales. Anyway I'll be
    > having an easy weekend that one after 300s and 400s throughout May.


    thanks for that, saved me! yes hills I need but not savage little
    English ones
    (at least not 4.5AAA's worth of them).
     
  20. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    >
    > thanks for that, saved me! yes hills I need but not savage little
    > English ones
    > (at least not 4.5AAA's worth of them).


    The trouble is that if you want practice for La Marmotte you need
    to work towards 5000m climbing in 170km.

    The Dales Gimpeur is one of the few AUK routes with enough climbing
    in to get near. Even then it's 4,400m in 200km so easier.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
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