La Marmotte

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by MartinM, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. MartinM wrote:
    > Just registered for this ride on www.sportcommunication.com
    >
    > What have I done? it was enough of a task to drive up Galibier last
    > year. I do intend to ride AdH at the end despite saying "never again"


    Have ridden up the Glandon and onto the Croix de fer and on a different
    day, Alpe D'Huez. How does the Telegraph / Galibier ride compare?

    Paul
     


  2. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > > Just registered for this ride on www.sportcommunication.com
    > >
    > > What have I done? it was enough of a task to drive up Galibier last
    > > year. I do intend to ride AdH at the end despite saying "never again"

    >
    > Have ridden up the Glandon and onto the Croix de fer and on a different
    > day, Alpe D'Huez. How does the Telegraph / Galibier ride compare?


    http://www.sportcommunication.com/newsite/profil.php?Id=128&langue=1

    and I thought Huez was hard! This is going to be kill or cure for me.
     
  3. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > >
    > > thanks for that, saved me! yes hills I need but not savage little
    > > English ones
    > > (at least not 4.5AAA's worth of them).

    >
    > The trouble is that if you want practice for La Marmotte you need
    > to work towards 5000m climbing in 170km.
    >
    > The Dales Gimpeur is one of the few AUK routes with enough climbing
    > in to get near. Even then it's 4,400m in 200km so easier.


    The applecross grimpeur.
    It doesn't exist yet but is back and forth over the Bealach na Ba until
    you get to 200km.. ;-)

    This makes the Snow Roads 300 look easy..

    ...d
     
  4. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >
    > Have ridden up the Glandon and onto the Croix de fer and on a different
    > day, Alpe D'Huez. How does the Telegraph / Galibier ride compare?


    It's harder than any of them IMO. The Telegraph isn't hard, but the
    Galibier is and there's only a small amount of rest from the Telegraph
    to the Galibier.

    Arhtur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  5. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Have ridden up the Glandon and onto the Croix de fer and on a different
    > > day, Alpe D'Huez. How does the Telegraph / Galibier ride compare?

    >
    > It's harder than any of them IMO. The Telegraph isn't hard, but the
    > Galibier is and there's only a small amount of rest from the Telegraph
    > to the Galibier.


    What gear did you use for Galibier? I did Huez on a 39x26 but have the
    option of a 30x26 (but on a heavier bike), I suppose I could fit the
    triple to the lighter bike and just use the bottom 2. Depends on how
    I'm going to get from the airport.
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    MartinM ([email protected]) wrote:

    > http://www.sportcommunication.com/newsite/profil.php?Id=128&langue=1


    Ooog. You are this: mad.

    About where the "5" is coming off the Galibier I had my motorcar's
    clutch cable break and in wasn't until well the other side of Bourg
    d'Oisans that I found a piece of ground level enough to permit me to
    pull over and fit the spare, Alp fans.

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Never give a gun to ducks.
     
  7. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    >
    > What gear did you use for Galibier? I did Huez on a 39x26 but have the
    > option of a 30x26 (but on a heavier bike), I suppose I could fit the
    > triple to the lighter bike and just use the bottom 2. Depends on how
    > I'm going to get from the airport.



    I used 34x26 extensivily. In fact, pretty much all day.

    I suggest buying a cheap compact chainset and fitting that to the light
    bike as the best solution. Otherwise a 28 would be wise.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  8. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    > >
    > > What gear did you use for Galibier? I did Huez on a 39x26 but have the
    > > option of a 30x26 (but on a heavier bike), I suppose I could fit the
    > > triple to the lighter bike and just use the bottom 2. Depends on how
    > > I'm going to get from the airport.

    >
    >
    > I used 34x26 extensivily. In fact, pretty much all day.


    I can't see I'll have use for the 53 even downhill ;-)

    > I suggest buying a cheap compact chainset and fitting that to the light
    > bike as the best solution. Otherwise a 28 would be wise.


    that's what I was thinking; alternatively buy a Sora triple and put the
    39 ring off the light bike and just use the 39 and 30; I can then
    cascade it onto the heavy bike afterwards. I will need to buy one of
    those rackless bags (was going to for PBP anyway) if camping. All in a
    state of flux ATM waiting for other club members to decide what they
    are doing.
     
  9. Dave Larrington wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > MartinM ([email protected]) wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.sportcommunication.com/newsite/profil.php?Id=128&langue=1

    >
    > Ooog. You are this: mad.


    That seems right.

    > About where the "5" is coming off the Galibier I had my motorcar's
    > clutch cable break and in wasn't until well the other side of Bourg
    > d'Oisans that I found a piece of ground level enough to permit me to
    > pull over and fit the spare, Alp fans.


    Ooog. You are this: mad.

    --
    Ambrose
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, Ambrose Nankivell
    ([email protected]) wrote:
    > Dave Larrington wrote:


    > > About where the "5" is coming off the Galibier I had my motorcar's
    > > clutch cable break and in wasn't until well the other side of Bourg
    > > d'Oisans that I found a piece of ground level enough to permit me to
    > > pull over and fit the spare, Alp fans.

    >
    > Ooog. You are this: mad.


    Actually it wasn't that bad as I would most likely have been creeping
    down in second anyway. Though getting through the crowded town centre
    of Bourg d'Oisans without one was, ah, interesting. And at least I
    /had/ a spare clutch cable, which I should not have had the original not
    been jerry-fixed by an AA spannerman in Clapham High Street six days
    previously :)

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Stop it! You're scarin' the Hippo...
     
  11. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    MartinM wrote:

    >
    > that's what I was thinking; alternatively buy a Sora triple and put the
    > 39 ring off the light bike and just use the 39 and 30; I can then


    I don't suggest this - the descents are very long and it's possible
    to lose a fair amount of time on them. There are enough places where
    being able to tap a big gear over would be useful that I'd say a
    39 would be limiting.

    I used a 48 big and that was ample (on a Campag 13-26 9-speed block
    with the 13 replaced by a 12 to give a gap at the top)

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  12. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Ambrose Nankivell
    > ([email protected]) wrote:
    > > Dave Larrington wrote:

    >
    > > > About where the "5" is coming off the Galibier I had my motorcar's
    > > > clutch cable break and in wasn't until well the other side of Bourg
    > > > d'Oisans that I found a piece of ground level enough to permit me to
    > > > pull over and fit the spare, Alp fans.

    > >
    > > Ooog. You are this: mad.

    >
    > Actually it wasn't that bad as I would most likely have been creeping
    > down in second anyway. Though getting through the crowded town centre
    > of Bourg d'Oisans without one was, ah, interesting. And at least I
    > /had/ a spare clutch cable, which I should not have had the original not
    > been jerry-fixed by an AA spannerman in Clapham High Street six days
    > previously :)


    Drove up and down the Sella pass in teh dolomites with a transit
    minibus of no vintage whatsoever [1] and no working clutch[2]. It was
    a few days before it could be fixed so we drove it around somewhat. You
    get very good at a crash box. Up hairpin bends is interesting.

    ...d

    [1] less than 6 months and 4,500 miles of which one third were getting
    to the hills.
    [2] Many parts of a mangled and seized clutch. NAPS.
     
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