Lactate threshold zones



Cpro

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Jan 27, 2012
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Please guys i need your help, about the training zones with indicator lactate threshold.
If i configured my training zones with indicator lactate threshold, i read somewhere that the lactate threshold increased, so that means that my training zones must be recalculated, is that right or wrong? And how often must calculate the lactate threshold to create my training zones?
 

danfoz

Well-Known Member
Apr 12, 2011
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That is correct. When I got back into it awhile back I was in such sorry shape that I would start going anerobic before 80%Max HR, tempo for most, so the zones my computer set were somewhat meaningless. Once in shape this levels off quite a bit - I quickly settled in relatively closely to the zones suggested by my bike computer. Not sure how you are doing it, but I now use a field test to determine my appropriate zones. Different coaches have different baselines, some say a full hour, some say 20 mins, and some even go as low as 8-10 minutes. All reputable coaches. Essentially one's zones would be determined from a maximum sustainable intensity for the time length of whatever particular method you are subscibing to, with zones based on a percentage of that. These are used for training with and HR monitor or Power Meter. Rate of perceived effort (RPE) obviously does not require any test.

But I would suggest recalculating after 1) any significant time off the bike, 2) after any sizeable training block, or 3) after any noticeable perception of improved fitness.
 

awilki01

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Sep 20, 2011
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Some don't agree with formal testing, but I personally do. So, with that said, you need to set up a time during the week to go do an FTP test (if you use a power meter) or a HR based threshold test.

Since this is not in the power forum, I'm going to assume you use a HR monitor. Joe Friel, in his book, The Cyclists Training Bible, talks about going out and doing a 30 minute time trial. You go as hard as you can maintain for 30 minutes. You record the average HR for the last 20 minutes of the 30 minute effort. That number is your LTHR. If you follow periodization, I would do it late in a rest week. If you don't, then make sure you are pretty rested before you do it. Also, I HIGHLY recommend you do not do this on an indoor trainer. Do it on the open road.
 

bgoetz

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Nov 25, 2010
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Originally Posted by awilki01 .
Also, I HIGHLY recommend you do not do this on an indoor trainer. Do it on the open road.

I would actually recommend the opposite. The road has way to many variables (wind, elevation changes, stop signs, cars). This needs to be done at a steady pace in a controlled environment. It is pretty difficult to even find a location that will allow for 20min of uninterrupted cycling, that is 8-9 miles with no stop signs or other interferences. Also, if the OP does it right he is going to be hurting for most of the effort, I think it is safer to take yourself to that place inside, on a trainer, with no cars...

Do a couple 20min all out efforts, if you have a rear speed sensor then use your speed/cadence to keep your effort steady. Start the 20min when your HR feels like it is close to where you think your LT is going to be. Do this a couple times and look at your average HR and you will have a good feel for your LT HR. At the end of the day if your are a bpm either way it won't make a huge difference, HR is not an accurate enough tool to determine actual zones based on effort...
 

awilki01

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Sep 20, 2011
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Originally Posted by bgoetz .




I would actually recommend the opposite. The road has way to many variables (wind, elevation changes, stop signs, cars). This needs to be done at a steady pace in a controlled environment. It is pretty difficult to even find a location that will allow for 20min of uninterrupted cycling, that is 8-9 miles with no stop signs or other interferences. Also, if the OP does it right he is going to be hurting for most of the effort, I think it is safer to take yourself to that place inside, on a trainer, with no cars...

Do a couple 20min all out efforts, if you have a rear speed sensor then use your speed/cadence to keep your effort steady. Start the 20min when your HR feels like it is close to where you think your LT is going to be. Do this a couple times and look at your average HR and you will have a good feel for your LT HR. At the end of the day if your are a bpm either way it won't make a huge difference, HR is not an accurate enough tool to determine actual zones based on effort...


People usually generate more power on the road than a trainer. In theory, your statements are sound. In practice, not so much. I had Joe Friel tell me the same thing in a response I sent to one of his blog posts. I have roads here that are 8-9 miles with no stops.
 

Cpro

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Jan 27, 2012
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Guys, maybe you dont understand the problem. I think that only danfoz give an opinion that is inside the problem. The problem was, how often i must calculate my zones through the non permanent character of lactate threshold. Anyway, thanks for your advices. I working only on the road, is the best race simulator.
 

vspa

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Jan 11, 2009
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Training at the lactate threshold means that you need to sustain the maximum possible power for a given time, too short would be named as an interval, and too long would mean that you are not at threshold level. This kind of training is nerve wrecking, so suggestions about how or where to do it are valuable too,
 

bgoetz

Active Member
Nov 25, 2010
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Originally Posted by awilki01 .




People usually generate more power on the road than a trainer. In theory, your statements are sound. In practice, not so much. I had Joe Friel tell me the same thing in a response I sent to one of his blog posts. I have roads here that are 8-9 miles with no stops.

The OP is looking for his HR zones, not power. If you are generating more power on the road then it is because you are racing or are more motivated to ride harder, there is no other reason why you would generate more power. I like the idea of updating FTP based on data accumulated over time, but the best place for an interval will always be the trainer...
 

Alex Simmons

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Mar 12, 2006
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Originally Posted by bgoetz .



The OP is looking for his HR zones, not power. If you are generating more power on the road then it is because you are racing or are more motivated to ride harder, there is no other reason why you would generate more power. I like the idea of updating FTP based on data accumulated over time, but the best place for an interval will always be the trainer...
There are several other reasons why power might be different indoor to out.
http://alex-cycle.blogspot.com/2009/01/turbocharged-training.html

Intervals are best done wherever you can do the work. Pretty hard to do hill intervals on anything but a hill.
 

bgoetz

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Nov 25, 2010
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Originally Posted by Alex Simmons .


Intervals are best done wherever you can do the work. Pretty hard to do hill intervals on anything but a hill.

I thought the same thing and then I started using a computrainer, that thing replicates a hill pretty dang well.......