Lactic Acid

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Ryan Prout, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. Ryan Prout

    Ryan Prout Guest

    Hi All, I have a race on Saturday that I would ideally like to have a very good run in. I did a bit
    of tempo work last night and my legs felt really heavy and it was a real effort. Has anyone got any
    ideas on how I can loosen them out?

    Thanks Ryan
     
    Tags:


  2. Ryan Prout <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi All, I have a race on Saturday that I would ideally like to have a very good run in. I did a
    > bit of tempo work last night and my legs felt really heavy and it was a real effort. Has anyone
    > got any ideas on how I can loosen them out?

    Go swimming. Nothing too hard.

    -Dave

    --
    work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at - pobox.com MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/ (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do
    not accept unsolicited email. Do not mail me.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Ryan Prout wrote:
    > Hi All, I have a race on Saturday that I would ideally like to have a very good run in. I did a
    > bit of tempo work last night and my legs felt really heavy and it was a real effort. Has anyone
    > got any ideas on how I can loosen them out?

    The subject line is somewhat ill-posed -- lactic acid actually clears up very quickly. Muscle
    damage, which causes DOMS takes somewhat longer to recover from, but you've got plenty of time. Just
    continue with easy running up to the race, consider taking a day off the day before.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  4. ahass

    ahass Guest

    Ryan Prout <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi All, I have a race on Saturday that I would ideally like to have a very good run in. I did a
    > bit of tempo work last night and my legs felt really heavy and it was a real effort. Has anyone
    > got any ideas on how I can loosen them out?

    > Thanks Ryan

    Go for a few easy, slow miles to work them out. Then do a few short (150m) accelerations at the
    end. Andy Hass
     
  5. Apusapus

    Apusapus Guest

  6. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Go for a few easy, slow miles to work them out. Then do a few short (150m) accelerations at
    > the end.

    What will the accelerations do?

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  7. Apusapus

    Apusapus Guest

  8. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Go for a few easy, slow miles to work them out. Then do a few short (150m) accelerations at
    > the end.

    What will the accelerations do?

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  9. apusapus <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Dave Andersen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> Go swimming. Nothing too hard.
    >
    > Dave, you're an idiot.

    Roger, I think that's the shortest post you've made in months. I'm proud.

    A nice swim workout gets your blood going and doesn't tire the same muscles you're going to run
    on. A nice light jog will have the same effect, but if you're not used to doing a lot of running,
    may not be as beneficial. I find that I get a similar effect from a light cycling workout the day
    after a hard run workout.

    Please, oh babbling font of wisdom, tell me why I'm wrong.

    -Dave

    --
    work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at - pobox.com MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/ (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do
    not accept unsolicited email. Do not mail me.
     
  10. You

    You Guest

  11. jobin

    jobin Guest

    Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:

    >> Go for a few easy, slow miles to work them out. Then do a few short (150m) accelerations at
    >> the end.

    > What will the accelerations do?

    i think they help the loosen up the muscles a bit. after a slow run, i sometimes put in a little
    surge or two and i can definitely feel the muscles relaxing.

    jobs
     
  12. apusapus <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Dave Andersen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> Go swimming. Nothing too hard.
    >
    > Dave, you're an idiot.

    Roger, I think that's the shortest post you've made in months. I'm proud.

    A nice swim workout gets your blood going and doesn't tire the same muscles you're going to run
    on. A nice light jog will have the same effect, but if you're not used to doing a lot of running,
    may not be as beneficial. I find that I get a similar effect from a light cycling workout the day
    after a hard run workout.

    Please, oh babbling font of wisdom, tell me why I'm wrong.

    -Dave

    --
    work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at - pobox.com MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/ (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do
    not accept unsolicited email. Do not mail me.
     
  13. You

    You Guest

  14. ahass

    ahass Guest

    Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:

    >> Go for a few easy, slow miles to work them out. Then do a few short (150m) accelerations at
    >> the end.

    > What will the accelerations do?

    > --
    > Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]

    ----A few accelerations at the end of easy runs seem to help keep the snap in the legs. For me at
    least, if I do this after a very easy recovery run, I feel a lot better. He has to race soon, he
    needs to keep the feeling of good turnover in his legs without working too hard. Andy Hass
     
  15. jobin

    jobin Guest

    Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:

    >> Go for a few easy, slow miles to work them out. Then do a few short (150m) accelerations at
    >> the end.

    > What will the accelerations do?

    i think they help the loosen up the muscles a bit. after a slow run, i sometimes put in a little
    surge or two and i can definitely feel the muscles relaxing.

    jobs
     
  16. ahass

    ahass Guest

    Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:

    >> Go for a few easy, slow miles to work them out. Then do a few short (150m) accelerations at
    >> the end.

    > What will the accelerations do?

    > --
    > Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]

    ----A few accelerations at the end of easy runs seem to help keep the snap in the legs. For me at
    least, if I do this after a very easy recovery run, I feel a lot better. He has to race soon, he
    needs to keep the feeling of good turnover in his legs without working too hard. Andy Hass
     
  17. Dave Andersen <[email protected]> wrote:
    > apusapus <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> "Dave Andersen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>> Go swimming. Nothing too hard.
    >>
    >> Dave, you're an idiot.
    >
    > Roger, I think that's the shortest post you've made in months. I'm proud.
    >
    > A nice swim workout gets your blood going and doesn't tire the same muscles you're going to run
    > on. A nice light jog will have the same effect, but if you're not used to doing a lot of running,
    > may not be as beneficial. I find that I get a similar effect from a light cycling workout the day
    > after a hard run workout.
    >
    > Please, oh babbling font of wisdom, tell me why I'm wrong.

    ... and I know, I shouldn't rise to the bait, but:

    http://www.poweringmuscles.com/musclerecovery.asp?article_number=14

    "Rest is essential for recovery, but when done properly, combining active recovery workouts with
    outright rest results in better recovery than you can achieve through rest alone."

    More in the injury sense, but also applicable to general muscle soreness:

    http://www.clarian.org/health/NIFS/recovery.jhtml

    "Cross-Training. Don't wait until you are completely free of soreness to begin exercising. Low
    impact exercise such as swimming, stair climbing, or an elliptical exercise machine will promote
    blood flow and speed the healing process."

    From the perspective of an older runner who's plateaued a bit:

    http://www.sportsguidemag.com/archive/Jun03/TrainFit-recoverybased.as

    "Mondays are swim/recovery from the weekend long, race temp bike/run workout. [...] Thursday is a
    swim day and Friday is currently a total day off, but will also become a swim day the last month
    when I begin to taper my running a bit. After the two easier days with no running or cycling, I'm
    ready for the race simulation training on Saturday and give it a solid effort. "

    http://www.trifuel.com/triathlon/run/000319.php

    "Exercise in water is a very effective method of promoting recovery. The water pressure helps to
    remove the waste products and extra fluids that often builds up in the legs after running. Swimming
    is great too because it will use the arms and not further deplete the legs of energy stores plus you
    don't have the pounding of the road on your joins and muscles."

    I'm not suggesting that swimming will make him a better runner. But swimming _is_ a great method of
    active recovery.

    -Dave

    --
    work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at - pobox.com MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/ (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do
    not accept unsolicited email. Do not mail me.
     
  18. Apusapus

    Apusapus Guest

    "Dave Andersen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > > Dave, you're an idiot.

    > Please, oh babbling font of wisdom, tell me why I'm wrong.

    Oh, you thought I was talking about swimming? No, David, I was referring to your allegations of
    racism. Made in another thread, I know, but can't you draw the dots for yourself?

    I wrote a 9K answer based on my experiences in my country - Rhodesia - over the past four decades,
    which I then decided to spare you on two grounds. One, you wouldn't understand. Two, it wouldn't
    change a thing if you did. So I cut to the chase - which is:

    Dave, you're an idiot.

    Roger.
     
Loading...
Loading...