Lamb stew prep

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by OmManiPadmeOmelet, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    no longer here to consult <sigh>).

    Lots of fresh herbs from the herb garden, just a bit of sage, some
    rosemary, thyme, dittany and mexican oregano. 4 cloves of pressed
    garlic, one large onion and a nice bunch of thin sliced ginger root.

    I normally mince the herbs and grate or puree the ginger but I'll be
    taking the shank out for deboning, then straining the broth and
    discarding the solids.

    See pic:

    http://i1.tinypic.com/muwgft.jpg

    (That was prior to adding water).

    I'll then add back the meat, some chopped carrots, sliced yams, sliced
    celery, mushrooms, shallots, and another onion. Bring back up to
    pressure and adjust the seasonings (forgot to add pepper initially darn
    it!) and will pressure for about another 10 minutes to cook the veggies
    prior to serving.

    Might toss in a handful of baby spinach leaves to wilt in at the end.....

    Any advice on cooking lamb shank is appreciated. I still have another
    one in the freezer. ;-)
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
    Tags:


  2. Gabby

    Gabby Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > no longer here to consult <sigh>).


    Whimper, whimper, whimper.

    I wish I could find lamb shanks around here but nobody raises sheep. I used
    to curry lamb shanks and didn't find them anywhere near as tough as pork
    hocks but they're nowhere near as dense either. I usually pressure cook
    pork hocks about 45 minutes before I add the veggies but didn't find that
    lamb shanks required more cooking than other meats.

    Gabby
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Gabby" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > > no longer here to consult <sigh>).

    >
    > Whimper, whimper, whimper.
    >
    > I wish I could find lamb shanks around here but nobody raises sheep.


    I actually found these at the grocery store, vacuum packed. :)

    > I used
    > to curry lamb shanks and didn't find them anywhere near as tough as pork
    > hocks but they're nowhere near as dense either. I usually pressure cook
    > pork hocks about 45 minutes before I add the veggies but didn't find that
    > lamb shanks required more cooking than other meats.


    Ok, but 45 minutes turned out ok?
    I did this one for 50 minutes and it's still cooling so I can remove it
    and strain.

    Thanks! :)
    Curry is a good idea!

    >
    > Gabby
    >
    >

    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  4. "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > no longer here to consult <sigh>).

    snip
    Om

    I think the shanks will be done after first pressure cooking. You might
    want to stove top cook the vegetables and add the meat back in at the last.
    It's been awhile since I've done lamb shanks and I don't think I've ever
    pressured them because they aren't that tough. You'll be o.k..
    Janet
     
  5. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > no longer here to consult <sigh>).


    You'll be lucky if it actually stays on the bone after pressure
    cooking. Yum!

    > Lots of fresh herbs from the herb garden, just a bit of sage, some
    > rosemary, thyme, dittany and mexican oregano. 4 cloves of pressed
    > garlic, one large onion and a nice bunch of thin sliced ginger root.
    >
    > I normally mince the herbs and grate or puree the ginger but I'll be
    > taking the shank out for deboning, then straining the broth and
    > discarding the solids.
    >
    > See pic:
    >
    > http://i1.tinypic.com/muwgft.jpg
    >
    > (That was prior to adding water).
    >
    > I'll then add back the meat, some chopped carrots, sliced yams, sliced
    > celery, mushrooms, shallots, and another onion. Bring back up to
    > pressure and adjust the seasonings (forgot to add pepper initially darn
    > it!) and will pressure for about another 10 minutes to cook the veggies
    > prior to serving.
    >
    > Might toss in a handful of baby spinach leaves to wilt in at the end.....
    >
    > Any advice on cooking lamb shank is appreciated. I still have another
    > one in the freezer. ;-)


    Just plain roasted in the oven with some fresh rosemary on a bed of
    chopped (but not finely) onions.

    Doc
     
  6. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > no longer here to consult <sigh>).
    >
    > Lots of fresh herbs from the herb garden, just a bit of sage, some
    > rosemary, thyme, dittany and mexican oregano. 4 cloves of pressed
    > garlic, one large onion and a nice bunch of thin sliced ginger root.
    >
    > I normally mince the herbs and grate or puree the ginger but I'll be
    > taking the shank out for deboning, then straining the broth and
    > discarding the solids.
    >
    > See pic:
    >
    > http://i1.tinypic.com/muwgft.jpg
    >
    > (That was prior to adding water).
    >
    > I'll then add back the meat, some chopped carrots, sliced yams, sliced
    > celery, mushrooms, shallots, and another onion. Bring back up to
    > pressure and adjust the seasonings (forgot to add pepper initially darn
    > it!) and will pressure for about another 10 minutes to cook the veggies
    > prior to serving.
    >
    > Might toss in a handful of baby spinach leaves to wilt in at the end.....
    >
    > Any advice on cooking lamb shank is appreciated. I still have another
    > one in the freezer. ;-)
    > --


    Lamb shanks are great. I highly recommend browning them first. It adds a lot
    of flavor to the whole dish.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  7. Frenchy

    Frenchy Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    : It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    : and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    : tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    : are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    : no longer here to consult <sigh>).
    :
    : Lots of fresh herbs from the herb garden, just a bit of sage, some
    : rosemary, thyme, dittany and mexican oregano. 4 cloves of pressed
    : garlic, one large onion and a nice bunch of thin sliced ginger root.
    :
    snip

    This way works every time.

    Lamb Shanks Frenchy:

    This is really best done with a pressure cooker. At a pinch, you could do the
    first boiling part on the stove top in a large covered pan, but you would need to
    boil for about 2 hours.

    Ideally this should be prepared 1 day in advance, but it can all be done that day
    if you don't mind the extra fat!

    In a Pressure cooker, put about 2" of water.

    Add salt/pepper
    A few sprigs of fresh rosemary (dried at a pinch)
    2 - 3 cloves of garlic shopped fine
    1 large or 2 small onions, topped and tailed and then cut in quarters BUT leave
    the brown skin on
    2 Bay leaves
    2-3 carrots chopped in slices
    Pack the lamb shanks in

    Bring to the boil with the lid off and then put the pressure cooker lid on
    Pressure cook for about 35 minutes.

    Remove the shanks to a dish and cover and refrigerate for the next day
    leave the meat on the bones! They get served on the bone.
    Strain the juice and cover and into the fridge to allow the fat to rise and
    solidify

    The next day, the juice will be a jelly.
    Remove all the fat you can with a teaspoon

    Heat the juice for 3 minutes in the microwave to bring back to a liquid.

    In a covered roasting pan, slice 2-3 onions thickly and make a bed at the bottom
    of the pan
    Lay the shanks on the onion slices. A sprinkle of salt and pepper will aid the
    taste
    Pour over the juice

    Cover and bake at 180 deg C for 1-2 hours, or if needed, a lower temperature and
    longer. KEEP COVERED so they don't dry out.

    When ready, take shanks out and on the stove top, thicken the juice/onion mixture
    with a little arrowroot or cornflour in water.

    You can use Bisto (Gravy Powder) if you like a darker sauce, it adds a bit of
    flavour as well.

    Goes nice with a good garlic mashed potato. 1-2 shanks per person, with some
    sauce dribbled over them.
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > > no longer here to consult <sigh>).

    > snip
    > Om
    >
    > I think the shanks will be done after first pressure cooking. You might
    > want to stove top cook the vegetables and add the meat back in at the last.
    > It's been awhile since I've done lamb shanks and I don't think I've ever
    > pressured them because they aren't that tough. You'll be o.k..
    > Janet
    >
    >


    I think you are right... :)
    The meat feels quite done and is falling off the bone.

    I'll cook the veggies separately, then add the meat back.

    Thanks for the suggestion! It's spot on....
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dr Hfuhruhurr" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > > no longer here to consult <sigh>).

    >
    > You'll be lucky if it actually stays on the bone after pressure
    > cooking. Yum!


    It's not. <G>

    >
    > > Lots of fresh herbs from the herb garden, just a bit of sage, some
    > > rosemary, thyme, dittany and mexican oregano. 4 cloves of pressed
    > > garlic, one large onion and a nice bunch of thin sliced ginger root.
    > >
    > > I normally mince the herbs and grate or puree the ginger but I'll be
    > > taking the shank out for deboning, then straining the broth and
    > > discarding the solids.
    > >
    > > See pic:
    > >
    > > http://i1.tinypic.com/muwgft.jpg
    > >
    > > (That was prior to adding water).
    > >
    > > I'll then add back the meat, some chopped carrots, sliced yams, sliced
    > > celery, mushrooms, shallots, and another onion. Bring back up to
    > > pressure and adjust the seasonings (forgot to add pepper initially darn
    > > it!) and will pressure for about another 10 minutes to cook the veggies
    > > prior to serving.
    > >
    > > Might toss in a handful of baby spinach leaves to wilt in at the end.....
    > >
    > > Any advice on cooking lamb shank is appreciated. I still have another
    > > one in the freezer. ;-)

    >
    > Just plain roasted in the oven with some fresh rosemary on a bed of
    > chopped (but not finely) onions.
    >
    > Doc


    Hmmmm... Roast lamb shank?
    How long and at what temp?

    >

    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Lamb shanks are great. I highly recommend browning them first. It adds a lot
    > of flavor to the whole dish.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Peter Aitken
    > Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm


    I'll do that with the second one, thanks!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Frenchy" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > : It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > : and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > : tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > : are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > : no longer here to consult <sigh>).
    > :
    > : Lots of fresh herbs from the herb garden, just a bit of sage, some
    > : rosemary, thyme, dittany and mexican oregano. 4 cloves of pressed
    > : garlic, one large onion and a nice bunch of thin sliced ginger root.
    > :
    > snip
    >
    > This way works every time.
    >
    > Lamb Shanks Frenchy:
    >
    > This is really best done with a pressure cooker. At a pinch, you could do
    > the
    > first boiling part on the stove top in a large covered pan, but you would
    > need to
    > boil for about 2 hours.


    I'll stick with pressuring thanks. <G>
    I grew up with using those things.

    >
    > Ideally this should be prepared 1 day in advance, but it can all be done that
    > day
    > if you don't mind the extra fat!


    For something I know to be fatty, I always prepare in advance so I can
    cool and skim. That's what I'm doing at the moment with this one.

    >
    > In a Pressure cooker, put about 2" of water.
    >
    > Add salt/pepper
    > A few sprigs of fresh rosemary (dried at a pinch)


    Rosemary is too easy to grow here. My bush is getting to be rather large
    so I give it away to freinds. :)

    The rest sounds wonderful, thanks!!!!!

    <snipped rest of cool recipe>
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  12. "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:Omelet-snip

    >> I think the shanks will be done after first pressure cooking. You might
    >> want to stove top cook the vegetables and add the meat back in at the
    >> last.
    >> It's been awhile since I've done lamb shanks and I don't think I've ever
    >> pressured them because they aren't that tough. You'll be o.k..
    >> Janet


    > I think you are right... :)
    > The meat feels quite done and is falling off the bone.
    >
    > I'll cook the veggies separately, then add the meat back.
    >
    > Thanks for the suggestion! It's spot on....
    > --
    > Om.


    Dinner sounds great. I don't get lamb dinners much as my husband doesn't
    care for it. I used to do something with neck bones and tomatoes and onions
    and soy sauce over rice. Cheap dinner but good.
    have a nice dinner.
    Janet
     
  13. Lamb Shanks - my MIL braised them with celery and onions and a little
    curry powder. Then she topped them with "Bisquick" type dumplings that
    had golden (seedless) raisins stirred into the batter.

    I thought I'd died and gone to heaven!

    When I can get lamb shanks, (at the supermarket) they're usually
    packaged one or two at a time and only one package will be available. I
    stash 'em in my freezer tilll I get enough for a potfull.

    Lynn from Fargo
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:Omelet-snip
    >
    > >> I think the shanks will be done after first pressure cooking. You might
    > >> want to stove top cook the vegetables and add the meat back in at the
    > >> last.
    > >> It's been awhile since I've done lamb shanks and I don't think I've ever
    > >> pressured them because they aren't that tough. You'll be o.k..
    > >> Janet

    >
    > > I think you are right... :)
    > > The meat feels quite done and is falling off the bone.
    > >
    > > I'll cook the veggies separately, then add the meat back.
    > >
    > > Thanks for the suggestion! It's spot on....
    > > --
    > > Om.

    >
    > Dinner sounds great. I don't get lamb dinners much as my husband doesn't
    > care for it. I used to do something with neck bones and tomatoes and onions
    > and soy sauce over rice. Cheap dinner but good.
    > have a nice dinner.
    > Janet
    >
    >


    Thanks luv!

    Mom used to roast lamb breast so it drained well, then made sheppard
    stew out of it.

    Quite a bit of very heavy fat used to cook off, and the pre-roasting
    made for a very rich flavor.

    I don't eat a lot of lamb because it's very, very high priced here!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lynn from Fargo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lamb Shanks - my MIL braised them with celery and onions and a little
    > curry powder. Then she topped them with "Bisquick" type dumplings that
    > had golden (seedless) raisins stirred into the batter.
    >
    > I thought I'd died and gone to heaven!


    That sounds interesting!
    Meat and fruit always go well together if mixed properly.

    >
    > When I can get lamb shanks, (at the supermarket) they're usually
    > packaged one or two at a time and only one package will be available. I
    > stash 'em in my freezer tilll I get enough for a potfull.
    >
    > Lynn from Fargo


    These were vacuum packed in singles.

    >

    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  16. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Any advice on cooking lamb shank is appreciated. I still have another
    > one in the freezer. ;-)


    How about a lamb version of osso buco?

    Victor
     
  17. In article <1ha046m.t5r9h81i2eb58N%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Any advice on cooking lamb shank is appreciated. I still have another
    > > one in the freezer. ;-)

    >
    > How about a lamb version of osso buco?
    >
    > Victor


    I'll have to google it.......
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  18. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Lamb shanks are great. I highly recommend browning them first. It adds a lot
    >>of flavor to the whole dish.
    >>
    >>
    >>--
    >>Peter Aitken
    >>Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I'll do that with the second one, thanks!
    >
    >

    You should try coating the shanks with baharat before browning. Baharat
    is a Middle Eastern spice mix that gives a flavour reminiscent of
    allspice. Ingredients vary, but generally include black pepper, cumin,
    coriander, cinnamon, cloves, cardamom and nutmeg. I get mine from
    Herbies Spices.

    I do braised lamb shanks a lot in the winter. It's either 40 minutes in
    the pressure cooker or two hours in a slow oven. Usually the liquid is
    half a litre of red wine and four tablespoons of tomato paste because I
    like a nice thick sauce. If you don't want to use wine you could use
    chicken stock and tinned tomatoes. If you include finely chopped onion,
    carrot and celery then shred the meat after cooking you've got a very
    good pasta sauce.

    To think that when I was a kiddie we used to give lamb shanks to the
    dog! (Though, being a Scot, my Mum used them to make soup, as I still do.)

    Christine
     
  19. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Old Mother Ashby <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >>Lamb shanks are great. I highly recommend browning them first. It adds a
    > >>lot
    > >>of flavor to the whole dish.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >>Peter Aitken
    > >>Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >I'll do that with the second one, thanks!
    > >
    > >

    > You should try coating the shanks with baharat before browning. Baharat
    > is a Middle Eastern spice mix that gives a flavour reminiscent of
    > allspice. Ingredients vary, but generally include black pepper, cumin,
    > coriander, cinnamon, cloves, cardamom and nutmeg. I get mine from
    > Herbies Spices.
    >
    > I do braised lamb shanks a lot in the winter. It's either 40 minutes in
    > the pressure cooker or two hours in a slow oven. Usually the liquid is
    > half a litre of red wine and four tablespoons of tomato paste because I
    > like a nice thick sauce. If you don't want to use wine you could use
    > chicken stock and tinned tomatoes. If you include finely chopped onion,
    > carrot and celery then shred the meat after cooking you've got a very
    > good pasta sauce.
    >
    > To think that when I was a kiddie we used to give lamb shanks to the
    > dog! (Though, being a Scot, my Mum used them to make soup, as I still do.)
    >
    > Christine


    Amazing isn't it?

    Beef tongue used to be cheap too. Now it's a premium price!

    I have one of those in the freezer too. It's scheduled to be pressure
    cooked here shortly. ;-) It'll be served as sammiches on rye toast.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  20. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Dr Hfuhruhurr" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >
    > > > It just came up to pressure so the house smells delightfully of garlic
    > > > and herbs. ;-) I'll turn it off in about 45 minutes since shanks are
    > > > tough enough to need a long pressure time. I presume that lamb shanks
    > > > are as tough as pork hocks??? (I've never cooked lamb before and mom is
    > > > no longer here to consult <sigh>).

    > >
    > > You'll be lucky if it actually stays on the bone after pressure
    > > cooking. Yum!

    >
    > It's not. <G>


    Heh, sounds fabulous.

    > >
    > > > Lots of fresh herbs from the herb garden, just a bit of sage, some
    > > > rosemary, thyme, dittany and mexican oregano. 4 cloves of pressed
    > > > garlic, one large onion and a nice bunch of thin sliced ginger root.
    > > >
    > > > I normally mince the herbs and grate or puree the ginger but I'll be
    > > > taking the shank out for deboning, then straining the broth and
    > > > discarding the solids.
    > > >
    > > > See pic:
    > > >
    > > > http://i1.tinypic.com/muwgft.jpg
    > > >
    > > > (That was prior to adding water).
    > > >
    > > > I'll then add back the meat, some chopped carrots, sliced yams, sliced
    > > > celery, mushrooms, shallots, and another onion. Bring back up to
    > > > pressure and adjust the seasonings (forgot to add pepper initially darn
    > > > it!) and will pressure for about another 10 minutes to cook the veggies
    > > > prior to serving.
    > > >
    > > > Might toss in a handful of baby spinach leaves to wilt in at the end.....
    > > >
    > > > Any advice on cooking lamb shank is appreciated. I still have another
    > > > one in the freezer. ;-)

    > >
    > > Just plain roasted in the oven with some fresh rosemary on a bed of
    > > chopped (but not finely) onions.
    > >
    > > Doc

    >
    > Hmmmm... Roast lamb shank?
    > How long and at what temp?


    Start off the first 20-30 mins very high then right down to say 250 F
    or so.
    Long and low as long as you've got say 2-3 or so hours to kill.
    A friend of mine once placed a leg of lamb in the bottom of his Arga to
    defrost. He promptly forgot about it and went out, only to return 6
    hours later to the must succulent tender piece of lamb he'd ever
    tasted. He didn't save any for me though :-(

    Doc
     
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