Lance and bike pain

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by John Riley, May 23, 2003.

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  1. John Riley

    John Riley New Member

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    I glanced at the June issue of _Outside_ magazine with cover story on Lance. Article suggested that numb feet, hands and crotch are common for the pros, including Lance. I know they spend a hell of a lot of time on the bike, but surely that can't be the case for pros, can it?

    johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
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  2. Harv

    Harv Guest

    How about racing for a couple hundred klicks with diarrhea (Greg LeMond in the TdF). These guys
    can't even do good drugs to keep the pain away anymore. "John Riley"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I glanced at the June issue of _Outside_ magazine with cover story on Lance. Article suggested
    > that numb feet, hands and crotch are common for the pros, including Lance. I know they spend a
    > hell of a lot of time on the bike, but surely that can't be the case for pros, can it?
    >
    > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  3. I thought that most of you realized that in pro racing like most pro sports pain was something you
    lived with. In the 70's I would squeeze my fat american feet into tiny italian shoes to ride a crit
    or rr and my feet would hurt sooo bad for awhile and then go numb. I the 80's I seem to remember
    riding a 118 mile course in under 5 hrs. What I most remember is the numbdick, my wife making fun of
    it until I remarked. What if its permanent? I went to riding a recumbent because any pressure on my
    left palm/wrist causes pain and numbness after 10 miles. As fo drugs...I take a n 81mg asprin daily
    and thats it.

    --
    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "harv" <harv*no_spam*@spininternet.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > How about racing for a couple hundred klicks with diarrhea (Greg LeMond in the TdF). These guys
    > can't even do good drugs to keep the pain away
    anymore.
    > "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I glanced at the June issue of _Outside_ magazine with cover story on Lance. Article suggested
    > > that numb feet, hands and crotch are common for the pros, including Lance. I know they spend a
    > > hell of a lot of time on the bike, but surely that can't be the case for pros, can it?
    > >
    > > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > >--------------------------<
    > > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  4. Paul Bruneau

    Paul Bruneau Guest

    I have no problem believing that pro riders have pain. It is their machismo that pushes them to ride
    through it.

    John Riley wrote:
    > I glanced at the June issue of _Outside_ magazine with cover story on Lance. Article suggested
    > that numb feet, hands and crotch are common for the pros, including Lance. I know they spend a
    > hell of a lot of time on the bike, but surely that can't be the case for pros, can it?
    >
    > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  5. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    "Jude T. McGloin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I thought that most of you realized that in pro racing like most pro sports pain was something you
    > lived with. [...]

    I would expect they would feel a lot of muscle pain, but the kinds of pains mentioned are generally
    thought of as bike fit issues, and in fact many lesser cyclists claim they can be avoided. I
    believed these bike issues and pains could be avoided by _some_ people (not including me, but
    presumably including pros). Maybe not.

    I know the pros spend a hell of a lot of time on the bike, but strictly in terms of time on the
    bike, lesser cyclists can get up there time-wise on tours. That is what brought me into the
    recumbent fold, lo, these many years ago ('82).

    johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  6. John Foltz

    John Foltz Guest

    john riley wrote:
    > "Jude T. McGloin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>I thought that most of you realized that in pro racing like most pro sports pain was something you
    >>lived with. [...]
    >
    >
    > I would expect they would feel a lot of muscle pain, but the kinds of pains mentioned are
    > generally thought of as bike fit issues, and in fact many lesser cyclists claim they can be
    > avoided. I believed these bike issues and pains could be avoided by _some_ people (not including
    > me, but presumably including pros). Maybe not.
    >

    I know there's a lot of 'lesser cyclists' who claim it is *only* a fit issue, and point at the pros
    as an example of a group who has no problems. "If they don't have problems, with all the miles they
    ride..." is how the argument goes. There goes that argument!

    Of course, the other part of their argument is that you're not supposed to actually _sit_ on the
    da**ed thing, it's only there for 'support.' Yeah, right. :-/
    --

    John Foltz --- O _ Baron --- _O _ V-Rex 24/63 --- _\\/\-%)
    _________(_)`=()___________________(_)= (_)_____
     
  7. Joe Sozanski

    Joe Sozanski Guest

    Paul, I don't think it's machismo as much as an ability to ignore pain/discomfort to almost
    selfdestructive levels. Joe Elmira, NY Wishbone #56

    Paul Bruneau <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have no problem believing that pro riders have pain. It is their machismo that pushes them to
    > ride through it.
    >
    > John Riley wrote:
    > > I glanced at the June issue of _Outside_ magazine with cover story on Lance. Article suggested
    > > that numb feet, hands and crotch are common for the pros, including Lance. I know they spend a
    > > hell of a lot of time on the bike, but surely that can't be the case for pros, can it?
    > >
    > > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  8. Paul Bruneau

    Paul Bruneau Guest

    Joe Sozanski wrote:
    > Paul, I don't think it's machismo as much as an ability to ignore pain/discomfort to almost
    > selfdestructive levels. Joe

    Yes, they would have to have the ability, but what would drive such behavior in the first place? The
    ability doesn't drive them, the ability allows them to do it. But the drive is behind it. Machismo,
    ego, desire to win, poor self-esteem, whatever.
     
  9. Joe, Well put. There are instances where pro football and other pro sport players have continued
    playing with painful dislocations, fractures and internal hemorrhaging. I have on occaision rode
    right thru a burn and cramp rather than quit half way up. However, the next day, and the next day I
    pay and pay. So I go look at myself in the mirror Some relief is gained from massage.
    --
    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "Joe Sozanski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Paul, I don't think it's machismo as much as an ability to ignore pain/discomfort to almost
    > selfdestructive levels. Joe Elmira, NY Wishbone #56
    >
    >
    > Paul Bruneau <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I have no problem believing that pro riders have pain. It is their machismo that pushes them to
    > > ride through it.
    > >
    > > John Riley wrote:
    > > > I glanced at the June issue of _Outside_ magazine with cover story on Lance. Article suggested
    > > > that numb feet, hands and crotch are common
    for
    > > > the pros, including Lance. I know they spend a hell of a lot of time
    on
    > > > the bike, but surely that can't be the case for pros, can it?
    > > >
    > > > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  10. "John Foltz" <[email protected]> @usa.net...
    > Of course, the other part of their argument is that you're not supposed to actually _sit_ on the
    > da**ed thing, it's only there for 'support.' Yeah, right. :-/

    Look John, until you people lose some weight and get fit you're not going to be able to take part in
    sports such as cycling.

    When you get fit, go buy something like a nice Selle Italia SLR, and then you will see what we're
    talking about.
     
  11. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    > Paul Bruneau <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I have no problem believing that pro riders have pain. It is their machismo that pushes them to
    > > ride through it.

    "Joe Sozanski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Paul, I don't think it's machismo as much as an ability to ignore pain/discomfort to almost
    > selfdestructive levels.

    Paul is probably right.

    An old friend of mine was an Olympic cyclist. He once finished the last ~100 miles of a 500 mile
    race with a broken cable - gears stuck in 53/12. He finished the race more than an hour ahead of the
    2nd place rider, in just under 24 hours total. If he had ridden for another 20 minutes or so, he
    would have smashed the 24-hour world distance record (IIRC). I asked him what he was thinking that
    drove him to finish such an incredibly long race, and so far ahead of the competitors. He said "The
    1st place purse was enough to buy a motorcycle. I just kept thinking about the motorcycle."
    Incidentally, this was also the reason he didn't keep riding and break the 24-hour record: He had
    already won the motorcycle. Seems pretty clear and straightforward, doesn't it? He ignored pain and
    fatigue because he had the goal fixed in his mind.

    This same guy would do 100+ mile solo training rides wearing street shoes and cut-off shorts - ouch!
    I couldn't do 20 miles without cycling shorts. This guy had a very high threshold for pain, the
    right lungs, massive oxygen uptake, high metabolism and perfect muscle structure for championship
    cycling. He had superhuman power output and endurance. He also had the temperament for long hours in
    the saddle. That's how the pros (and pro-caliber amateurs) can do what they do: They're perfect
    cycling machines, born to it. The rest of us can just look at them in awe.

    -Barry
     
  12. Richard Ryan

    Richard Ryan Guest

    If I remember correctly one of the winners of the RAAM suffered permanent nerve damage in one hand
    and foot. Another had to duct tape a piece of 2 X 4 to his torso and around his head to finish the
    race because his neck muscles would no longer hold up his head. Very inspiring to the macho types I
    guess, but not to most people who probably would look at it as self destructive behavior.

    Dick Ryan
     
  13. Mike

    Mike Guest

    its not self destructive behavior or poor self esteem or macho behavior as some of these posters
    think, its being a high level competitive athlete, pain is part of the game, male or female...but
    its quite apparent most of the naysayer have no idea what's it like to compete and train at a high
    level and never will understand it. if lance didn't have that ability/focus he would have never made
    it out of the usa. just as i will never understand the high level business high jinks and back
    stabbing, fraud and embezzlement that occur in modern business and corporations. these people screw
    over other their own loyal people and friends, how much money do they need? i will never understand
    those people! must be low self esteem macho behavior...lol
     
  14. John Foltz

    John Foltz Guest

    Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:
    >
    > Look John, until you people lose some weight and get fit... (snip)
    >
    blah, blah. Suddenly, I'm getting very sleepy...
    --

    John Foltz --- O _ Baron --- _O _ V-Rex 24 --- _\\/\-%)
    _________(_)`=()___________________(_)= (_)_____
     
  15. Richard Ryan

    Richard Ryan Guest

    Driving yourself to the point of exhaustion is part of many athletic endeavors and IMO is not self
    destructive behavior, but if riding to the point of doing permanent damage to your body is not an
    example of destructive behavior then what is it an example of ? Dick Ryan

    "mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > its not self destructive behavior or poor self esteem or macho behavior as some of these posters
    > think, its being a high level competitive athlete, pain is part of the game, male or female...but
    > its quite apparent most of the naysayer have no idea what's it like to compete and train at a high
    > level and never will understand it. if lance didn't have that ability/focus he would have never
    > made it out of the usa. just as i will never understand the high level business high jinks and
    > back stabbing, fraud and embezzlement that occur in modern business and corporations. these people
    > screw over other their own loyal people and friends, how much money do they need? i will never
    > understand those people! must be low self esteem macho behavior...lol
     
  16. Mike

    Mike Guest

    "richard ryan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Driving yourself to the point of exhaustion is part of many athletic endeavors and IMO is not self
    > destructive behavior, but if riding to the point of doing permanent damage to your body is not an
    > example of destructive behavior then what is it an example of ? Dick Ryan

    well most times the people don't realize they are going to do permanent damage to their bodies,
    there is no gauge on what will cause permanent damage, what can be fixed with surgery, and what may
    be ok in 3 days , 2 weeks, months ,or 2 years or never. though the 2 x 4 seems a bit extreme. most
    likely the individual reasoning process had deteriorated. even on Mt Everest , when entering the
    death zone, different bodies acts differently and the climber that was fine last year , this year
    may succumb to the altitude
     
  17. John Riley

    John Riley New Member

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    What we are talking about is that it apparently doesn't matter how fit you are or what kind of saddle have on a conventional bike. Few of us will ever be as fit as the pros, and they apparently still have the pains.
     
  18. "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message .net.au...
    > What we are talking about is that it apparently doesn't matter how fit you are or what kind of
    > saddle have on a conventional bike. Few of us will ever be as fit as the pros, and they apparently
    > still have the pains.

    Mostly it's in say the third week of the tour when they have been doing long stages in very
    hot weather.

    It's really a great feeling to be as fit as me and able to do 3-5 hour tempo rides day after day and
    ride something like the 135 gram SLR Selle Italia.
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    "harv" <harv*no_spam*@spininternet.com> wrote:

    > "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I glanced at the June issue of _Outside_ magazine with cover story on Lance. Article suggested
    > > that numb feet, hands and crotch are common for the pros, including Lance. I know they spend a
    > > hell of a lot of time on the bike, but surely that can't be the case for pros, can it?
    > >
    > > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
    > >
    >
    >
    >
    > How about racing for a couple hundred klicks with diarrhea (Greg LeMond in the TdF). These guys
    > can't even do good drugs to keep the pain away anymore.

    And there's people who complain about not getting a good draft off a lowracer.

    Charleson Mambo

    (i don't use smileys)

    --
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To confuse, inveigle, and obfuscate.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    <spam> www.accanthology.com Buy "The Alt.Cyberpunk.Chatsubo Anthology" </spam>
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  20. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <chipomarc[email protected]> wrote in news:yoSAa.77141
    [email protected]:

    >
    > "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message .net.au...
    >> What we are talking about is that it apparently doesn't matter how fit you are or what kind of
    >> saddle have on a conventional bike. Few of us will ever be as fit as the pros, and they
    >> apparently still have the pains.
    >
    > Mostly it's in say the third week of the tour when they have been doing long stages in very hot
    > weather.
    >
    > It's really a great feeling to be as fit as me and able to do 3-5 hour tempo rides day after day
    > and ride something like the 135 gram SLR Selle Italia.
    >
    >
    >

    but you're kind of Richard.
     
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