Lance Armstrong Won't Fight Usada Charges

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by steve, Aug 23, 2012.

  1. steve

    steve Administrator
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    Lance Armstrong won't fight USADA charges‎ Lance Armstrong said Thursday night he is finished fighting a barrage of drug charges from the US Anti-Doping Agency, putting his unprecedented string of seven Tour de France titles at risk along with his legacy as one of the greatest cyclists in history. The decision sets up a likely lifetime ban from the sport and the possibility that Armstrong will be stripped of his signature achievement — the extraordinary run of Tour titles he won from 1999-2005. Armstrong, who retired last year, declined to enter arbitration — his last option — because he said he was weary of fighting accusations that have dogged him for years. He has consistently pointed to the hundreds of drug tests that he has passed as proof of his innocence. Full Story: http://msn.foxsports.com/cycling/story/lance-armstrong-will-not-fight-us-anti-doping-agency-charges-082312
     
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  2. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    When you start having claims and reports like:


    and


    and


    I can't see a District Court judge having a vested interest in this case but the last quote, following almost a couple of years worth of media hype from Landis, Hamillton et al, is just amazing... A huge WTF moment.

    All the quotes above are from CyclingNews articles in the past couple of weeks.
     
  3. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    I'm just listening to Paul Kimmage on Irish radio now.

    PK is saying that the UCI's refusal to deal with this issue in 1999 is the root issue in all of this.
     
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  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "Not one name, not one event, not one date,” said Sparks.

    So...Ulrich really did win the TDF? Brilliant!
     
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  5. Eldrack

    Eldrack New Member

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    This could get tricky. Remains to be see if they will properly strip him of the titles but if (or when...) they do are they going to do 7 new podiums? If we drag through the results of those 7 Tours just how many of the Top 10 *haven't* been convicted of doping at some point?

    It'll be something like "Congratulations Jan, you doped but served a two year ban so everything outside of that is all good so you can have a TdF title. Lance made the mistake of not getting a formal ban during his career so he's going to lose all his results..."

    Given that the evidence hasn't been aired and even if it was the quality of said evidence may not be definitive (but I guess "beyond all reasonable doubt" doesn't make it into doping cases) there still isn't any closure on this. People who thought he doped still think he doped. People who didn't think he doped still don't think he doped. Not sure if I give a crap anymore, all I care is that Wiggo won this years Tour!
     
  6. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Surprised that he didn't fight the charges other than that he is about the last big player of that period to fall, so no surprise here. Jan had put his book on hold. Not sure if this is a good time to finish it or maybe it would be an anti-climax now. This for sure reduces the US count on TDF wins. Some will cheer and others still proclaim his innocence.For me he is no more guilty than the rest of those that competed against him. It is still a sad note and a blow to cycling as a whole as the scandals keep overshadowing the triumphs. Beyond all that he was a great competitor and added excitment to the sport , whether you love him or hate him.
     
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  7. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    In terms of the sporting legacy and the charity work legacy, I think the above statement is spot on.

    I would hope that the authorities weigh up Armstrong's demeanour when allegations of his having cheated were made - when deliberating on the sanction to be imposed on Armstrong.

    I hope that the authorities weigh up the vendetta that Armstrong launched against riders, former riders, former team employees, and journalists who were courageous enough to pursue the evidence of his having doped - when deliberating on the sanction to be imposed on Armstrong.
     
  8. jpwkeeper

    jpwkeeper Member

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    The thing that really gets me is the mountains of money the USADA is spending on this. Mountains of money that could be spent investigating current doping avoidance techniques and developing better testing. Instead they're no closer to nabbing today's dopers then they were 6 months ago.

    So the only person I can see being a justified target in this is Johan, since he's currently working in cycling.

    I just don't know what this has accomplished for anyone's good. Even for whomever is heading up this mess it's got to be a pyrrhic victory.
     
  9. jpr95

    jpr95 New Member

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    Hey, this looks good for me. I mean, shoot, if they're just going to keep taking TdF titles and passing them down the line, I have a shot at winning those years! Never mind that I went on a total of 3 bike rides in that time frame...(probably less than 20 miles total).

    Jason
     
  10. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Perhaps if people accused of cheating had come out with their hands up and admitted their guilt instead of lying through their teeth to all and sundry for the best part of a decade, those clean riders (such that there are) would get their chance to shine in this sport?
     
  11. Eldrack

    Eldrack New Member

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    Trying to find the top clean rider in 1999 is like trying to play pin the tail on the donkey when the donkey is a real donkey and you've had a bottle of whisky.


    Rank Name Team Time Doping? 1 Lance Armstrong (USA) US Postal Service 91h 32' 16" Doper - various 2012 2 Alex Zülle (SUI) Banesto +7' 37" Doper - EPO 1998 3 Fernando Escartín (ESP) Kelme +10' 26" Systematic doping at Kelme but never convicted 4 Laurent Dufaux (SUI) Saeco +14' 43" Doping - EPO 1998 5 Ángel Casero (ESP) Vitalicio Seguros +15' 11" Operation Puerto link but never convicted 6 Abraham Olano (ESP) ONCE +16' 47" Postive for EPO in retroactive test 7 Daniele Nardello (ITA) Mapei +17' 02" CLEAN!??? Mapei was suspect though 8 Richard Virenque (FRA) Polti +17' 28" Doper - Festina affair. EPO and much, much more 9 Wladimir Belli (ITA) Festina +17' 37" Can't find anything substantial on this guy. Festina might have even cleaned up their act after 98 10 Andrea Peron (ITA) ONCE +23' 10" Investigated 2001 for doping


    So yeah... who do you give it to? Plenty of other lists on the internet for more recent versions of Le Tour and it's a similar story. Riddle with drug users.

    Maybe we should just do what other sports do, don't test as vigorously and go with the ignorance is bliss approach....
     
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  12. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Lance Armstrong's Statement of August 23, 2012
    AUSTIN, Texas - August 23rd, 2012 - There comes a point in every man's life when he has to say, "Enough is enough." For me, that time is now. I have been dealing with claims that I cheated and had an unfair advantage in winning my seven Tours since 1999. Over the past three years, I have been subjected to a two-year federal criminal investigation followed by Travis Tygart's unconstitutional witch hunt. The toll this has taken on my family, and my work for our foundation and on me leads me to where I am today – finished with this nonsense.

    I had hoped that a federal court would stop USADA’s charade. Although the court was sympathetic to my concerns and recognized the many improprieties and deficiencies in USADA’s motives, its conduct, and its process, the court ultimately decided that it could not intervene.

    If I thought for one moment that by participating in USADA’s process, I could confront these allegations in a fair setting and – once and for all – put these charges to rest, I would jump at the chance. But I refuse to participate in a process that is so one-sided and unfair. Regardless of what Travis Tygart says, there is zero physical evidence to support his outlandish and heinous claims. The only physical evidence here is the hundreds of controls I have passed with flying colors. I made myself available around the clock and around the world. In-competition. Out of competition. Blood. Urine. Whatever they asked for I provided. What is the point of all this testing if, in the end, USADA will not stand by it?

    From the beginning, however, this investigation has not been about learning the truth or cleaning up cycling, but about punishing me at all costs. I am a retired cyclist, yet USADA has lodged charges over 17 years old despite its own 8-year limitation. As respected organizations such as UCI and USA Cycling have made clear, USADA lacks jurisdiction even to bring these charges. The international bodies governing cycling have ordered USADA to stop, have given notice that no one should participate in USADA’s improper proceedings, and have made it clear the pronouncements by USADA that it has banned people for life or stripped them of their accomplishments are made without authority. And as many others, including USADA’s own arbitrators, have found, there is nothing even remotely fair about its process. USADA has broken the law, turned its back on its own rules, and stiff-armed those who have tried to persuade USADA to honor its obligations. At every turn, USADA has played the role of a bully, threatening everyone in its way and challenging the good faith of anyone who questions its motives or its methods, all at U.S. taxpayers’ expense. For the last two months, USADA has endlessly repeated the mantra that there should be a single set of rules, applicable to all, but they have arrogantly refused to practice what they preach. On top of all that, USADA has allegedly made deals with other riders that circumvent their own rules as long as they said I cheated. Many of those riders continue to race today.

    The bottom line is I played by the rules that were put in place by the UCI, WADA and USADA when I raced. The idea that athletes can be convicted today without positive A and B samples, under the same rules and procedures that apply to athletes with positive tests, perverts the system and creates a process where any begrudged ex-teammate can open a USADA case out of spite or for personal gain or a cheating cyclist can cut a sweetheart deal for themselves. It’s an unfair approach, applied selectively, in opposition to all the rules. It’s just not right.

    USADA cannot assert control of a professional international sport and attempt to strip my seven Tour de France titles. I know who won those seven Tours, my teammates know who won those seven Tours, and everyone I competed against knows who won those seven Tours. We all raced together. For three weeks over the same roads, the same mountains, and against all the weather and elements that we had to confront. There were no shortcuts, there was no special treatment. The same courses, the same rules. The toughest event in the world where the strongest man wins. Nobody can ever change that. Especially not Travis Tygart.

    Today I turn the page. I will no longer address this issue, regardless of the circumstances. I will commit myself to the work I began before ever winning a single Tour de France title: serving people and families affected by cancer, especially those in underserved communities. This October, my Foundation will celebrate 15 years of service to cancer survivors and the milestone of raising nearly $500 million. We have a lot of work to do and I'm looking forward to an end to this pointless distraction. I have a responsibility to all those who have stepped forward to devote their time and energy to the cancer cause. I will not stop fighting for that mission. Going forward, I am going to devote myself to raising my five beautiful (and energetic) kids, fighting cancer, and attempting to be the fittest 40-year old on the planet.

    http://lancearmstrong.com/news-events/lance-armstrongs-statement-of-august-23-2012

    ETA: Red text is mine.
     
  13. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps if people accused of cheating had come out with their hands up and admitted their guilt... those clean riders (such that there are) would get their chance to shine in this sport?

    You mean like Contador and Valverde? The guys we're cheering on to win the Vuelta today?

    Vino? The dude that just won the Olympic road race?

    Yay sport!!!
     
  14. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Them too, Campy.
     
  15. jpr95

    jpr95 New Member

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    I'd love to see a response from the USADA to that statement. Just so I can laugh at it. They just got owned.
     
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  16. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    You said it, Eld.

    The donkey would have to be heavily sedated in order to pin the tail on genuine TDF winner post 1998 (in the so called "clean era").
     
  17. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Them too, Campy.

    When everyone is thru weeding out the "them too" out of the ranks, I'm afraid it will come down to you and me fighting it out over the top of the Peyresourde.

    And...I'm pretty darned sure you did dope back in 1989! Yeah, I ain't got no proof, but I got your old mates willing to testify!

    Now, I just might keep the list of clean winners going...or maybe I'll start that list!...but, no one on the planet is going to tune in to see me timed with the Mayan calendar in the ITT!


    They just got owned.

    Lancer may have doped and he may have been pure as the driven snow, but I sure as hell love his attitude (In Irish, I think that's called "demeanour"!).

    Pwned!

    "Vicki...call Mayflower up! I'm sending back two shipping containers full of yellow jerseys and lions back! And call Hein...tell him I want that centrifuge back!".
     
  18. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Even if I took tonnes of the stuff, I still wouldn't win /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif

    I was a water carrier and a damn proud one too.
     
  19. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I was field filler, myself. Even at my best. I still am!

    Now, if only I could get my hands on some gran fondo rocket fuel...

    Maybe it COULD turn a mule into a thoroughbred!
     
  20. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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