Lance learns the truth...

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Alex Ravenel, Jul 15, 2003.

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  1. Alex Ravenel

    Alex Ravenel Guest

    ...That the dirt will always be there.

    I dont know how many of yall follow the Tour, being that it is a bunch of roadies... But apparently
    Lance did a bit of 'Cross action.

    "ONCE's Joseba Beloki crashed just four kilometers from the finish of the ninth stage of the Tour de
    France and suffered injuries serious enough to force him out of the three-week race. Four-time
    winner Lance Armstrong barely avoided going down in the same crash as he and Beloki were in hot
    pursuit of eventual stage winner Alexandre Vinokourov who had attacked on the day's final climb.
    Beloki was just 40 seconds adrift of the American in the overall standings and was leading Armstrong
    down the descent in the ninth stage when he braked sharply and came crashing down onto the road.
    "His (rear) tire exploded in front of me," Armstrong told French television. As Beloki went down,
    Armstrong barely managed to avoid him, was forced off the road and took a shortcut down the grassy
    part of the descent to rejoin the race. "I decided to do a bit of cyclo cross!" said Armstrong. "I
    was really scared. It was the reflexes of a survivor."

    By the way, Beloki broke his leg, wrist, and elbow in the crash.

    I really should cite the source that came from, but I didnt copy it down... Sorry guys. You can read
    more about it on VeloNews, though, Im sure...

    Still, thats pretty damn cool.

    --
    --------
    Alex Ravenel http://www.theravenel.net
     
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  2. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:07:34 GMT, Alex Ravenel <[email protected]> wrote:

    Yo Alex, two things make this post valid to ALT.MOUNTAIN-BIKE

    1. It happened on a mountain.
    2. Lance did some off-roading.

    Please keep all other Roadie Crap out of this NG ;-)

    Lance is DA MAN!

    Seeing Beloki crash was not fun. I wouldn't wish that type of crash on anyone. Hope he rides again.

    Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  3. Ad.

    Ad. Guest

    Alex Ravenel wrote:

    > ...That the dirt will always be there.
    >
    > I dont know how many of yall follow the Tour, being that it is a bunch of roadies... But
    > apparently Lance did a bit of 'Cross action.

    Damn freeriders! Stick to the trail!

    There, had to say it ;)

    Cheers Anton
     
  4. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    "AD." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Alex Ravenel wrote:
    > > ...That the dirt will always be there. I dont know how many of yall follow the Tour, being that
    > > it is a
    bunch of
    > > roadies... But apparently Lance did a bit of 'Cross action.
    > Damn freeriders! Stick to the trail! There, had to say it ;)

    Hot temperature, melting road surface and hot rims while braking on the descent are thought to be
    the reasons for Beloki's tyre coming off.

    PS Lance peeled off, rode down the rough, missed the hairpin turn and re joined the road behind the
    bunch who had been behind him. In XC ski races competitors are DQ'd for not covering the same
    trail and the same distance as the others.
     
  5. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 22:28:54 +0100, Taywood <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "AD." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Alex Ravenel wrote:
    >> > ...That the dirt will always be there. I dont know how many of yall follow the Tour, being that
    >> > it is a
    > bunch of
    >> > roadies... But apparently Lance did a bit of 'Cross action.
    >> Damn freeriders! Stick to the trail! There, had to say it ;)
    >
    > Hot temperature, melting road surface and hot rims while braking on the descent are thought to be
    > the reasons for Beloki's tyre coming off.
    >
    > PS Lance peeled off, rode down the rough, missed the hairpin turn and re joined the road behind
    > the bunch who had been behind him. In XC ski races competitors are DQ'd for not covering the
    > same trail and the same distance as the others.
    >
    >
    >

    He could have been disqualified, but they ruled that he didn't cover the distance because he was
    trying to get ahead -- it's basically the only thing he could do.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  6. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Taywood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "AD." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Alex Ravenel wrote:
    > > > ...That the dirt will always be there. I dont know how many of yall follow the Tour, being
    > > > that it is a
    > bunch of
    > > > roadies... But apparently Lance did a bit of 'Cross action.
    > > Damn freeriders! Stick to the trail! There, had to say it ;)
    >
    > Hot temperature, melting road surface and hot rims while braking on the descent are thought to be
    > the reasons for Beloki's tyre coming off.
    >
    > PS Lance peeled off, rode down the rough, missed the hairpin turn and re joined the road behind
    > the bunch who had been behind him. In XC ski races competitors are DQ'd for not covering the
    > same trail and the same distance as the others.

    You also usually don't get protesters sitting on the trail in XC skiing. They usually get too cold.

    He could have been penalized, but he started in front of the pack, made the only decision he could
    have, and ended up behind the pack. Hamilton said he was going to try to push him back to their
    speed, but realized that he stuck out his right arm - the one with the broken collarbone. Thats why
    he just kinda tapped him on the shoulder.

    Jon Bond
     
  7. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >He could have been penalized, but he started in front of the pack, made the only decision he could
    >have, and ended up behind the pack. Hamilton said he was going to try to push him back to their
    >speed, but realized that he stuck out his right arm - the one with the broken collarbone. Thats why
    >he just kinda tapped him on the shoulder.

    Oh now THAT would have made the entire scene complete - another of the top 10 going out with a
    shattered collarbone due to pushing Lance up to speed... eek!

    I agree that no one was going to lodge a protest against Lance for that little cyclocross excursion
    - in fact, I'd like to see them make it part of the course in future years. Heh.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  8. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Taywood wrote:

    > PS Lance peeled off, rode down the rough, missed the hairpin turn and re joined the road behind
    > the bunch who had been behind him. In XC ski races competitors are DQ'd for not covering the
    > same trail and the same distance as the others.

    The rules state that a rider is not allowed to deliberately run off course in attempt to improve his
    position. Seeing as he neither did it deliberately or was it to his advantage, no action was taken.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  9. On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 22:28:54 +0100, "Taywood" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >PS Lance peeled off, rode down the rough, missed the hairpin turn and re joined the road behind the
    > bunch who had been behind him. In XC ski races competitors are DQ'd for not covering the same
    > trail and the same distance as the others.
    >

    But in many forms of auto racing, a competitor is allowed to cut the course, as long as no time or
    positions are gained. Some sanctioning bodies state that the cut must be made to avoid a crash,
    while others don't.

    Since Lance lost positions and time, and was avoiding an accident, why would cut be such a
    bad thing?

    Barry
     
  10. Ed Y.

    Ed Y. Guest

    Alex Ravenel wrote in message
    > I dont know how many of yall follow the Tour, being that it is a bunch of roadies... But
    > apparently Lance did a bit of 'Cross action.

    Here it is on video: http://eurosport.com/home/pages/V3/L0/multimedia_Lng0.shtml Search for "Tour de
    France: Stage 9 highlights"
     
  11. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    Alex Ravenel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > ...That the dirt will always be there.
    >
    > I dont know how many of yall follow the Tour, being that it is a bunch of roadies... But
    > apparently Lance did a bit of 'Cross action.
    >
    > "ONCE's Joseba Beloki crashed just four kilometers from the finish of the ninth stage of the Tour
    > de France and suffered injuries serious enough to force him out of the three-week race. Four-time
    > winner Lance Armstrong barely avoided going down in the same crash as he and Beloki were in hot
    > pursuit of eventual stage winner Alexandre Vinokourov who had attacked on the day's final climb.
    > Beloki was just 40 seconds adrift of the American in the overall standings and was leading
    > Armstrong down the descent in the ninth stage when he braked sharply and came crashing down onto
    > the road. "His (rear) tire exploded in front of me," Armstrong told French television. As Beloki
    > went down, Armstrong barely managed to avoid him, was forced off the road and took a shortcut down
    > the grassy part of the descent to rejoin the race. "I decided to do a bit of cyclo cross!" said
    > Armstrong. "I was really scared. It was the reflexes of a survivor."
    >
    > By the way, Beloki broke his leg, wrist, and elbow in the crash.
    >
    >
    > I really should cite the source that came from, but I didnt copy it down... Sorry guys. You can
    > read more about it on VeloNews, though, Im sure...
    >
    > Still, thats pretty damn cool.

    Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's overcome,
    and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda talk from me
    about any other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.

    Paladin
     
  12. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Paladin wrote:
    >
    > Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    > overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda talk
    > from me about any other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.
    >
    > Paladin

    But he ain't no saint. He's an actual, everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way. This
    limits his utility as a role model for (some) children.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  13. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Paladin wrote:
    > >
    > > Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    > > overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda
    > > talk from me about any other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.
    > >
    > > Paladin
    >
    > But he ain't no saint. He's an actual, everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way. This
    > limits his utility as a role model for (some) children.

    Um, how?

    While I agree L.A.'s hardly perfect -- I'm sure he can be arrogant, self-centered, demanding, etc.
    -- his story and achievements are what serve as inspirations.

    I don't see how being "an everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way" limits his "utility
    as a role model". Quite the opposite, one would think. (And hope.)

    Just trying to get your point.

    Bill
     
  14. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Paladin wrote:

    > Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    > overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda talk
    > from me about any other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.

    You may one day come to eat those words...

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  15. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

  16. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Sorni wrote:
    > > "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>Paladin wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    > >>>overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda
    > >>>talk from me about any other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.
    > >>>
    > >>>Paladin
    > >>
    > >>But he ain't no saint. He's an actual, everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way.
    > >>This limits his utility as a role model for (some) children.
    > >
    > >
    > > Um, how?
    > >
    > > While I agree L.A.'s hardly perfect -- I'm sure he can be arrogant, self-centered, demanding,
    > > etc. -- his story and achievements are what
    serve
    > > as inspirations.
    > >
    > > I don't see how being "an everyday dude from a poor family who made his
    own
    > > way" limits his "utility as a role model". Quite the opposite, one
    would
    > > think. (And hope.)
    > >
    > > Just trying to get your point.
    > >
    > > Bill
    >
    > A hint: I live in Utah, and have for many years.
    >
    > I probably should have mentioned his potty mouth (not too bad by most standards) and agnosticism.
    >
    > I for one respect the hell out of the guy.

    You said h-e- double toothpicks!

    See what you meant now; their loss, eh?

    Bill (b-i- double toothpicks :)
     
  17. Raptor wrote:

    > Sorni wrote:
    >
    >> "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>> Paladin wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    >>>> overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda
    >>>> talk from me about any other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.
    >>>>
    >>>> Paladin
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> But he ain't no saint. He's an actual, everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way.
    >>> This limits his utility as a role model for (some) children.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Um, how?
    >>
    >> While I agree L.A.'s hardly perfect -- I'm sure he can be arrogant, self-centered, demanding,
    >> etc. -- his story and achievements are what serve as inspirations.
    >>
    >> I don't see how being "an everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way" limits his
    >> "utility as a role model". Quite the opposite, one would think. (And hope.)
    >>
    >> Just trying to get your point.
    >>
    >> Bill
    >
    >
    > A hint: I live in Utah, and have for many years.
    >
    > I probably should have mentioned his potty mouth (not too bad by most standards) and agnosticism.
    >
    > I for one respect the hell out of the guy.
    >
    You're scaring me here. Why is it he has limited "utility as a role model"? Because you have heard
    him swear and he may not believe in God. I suppose one decides on role models based on their own
    personal beliefs. I for one would like my kids to group up with a similar work ethic and
    appreciation for those around him who helped him get there. Listening to Mr. Armstrong's interviews
    on OLN recently, I really appreciate his attitude. He comes across as one who never blames others
    for his problems, understands he has good and bad days, realizes that although this is important, it
    is just a game. These are traits I want my childern to have and would like to continue to develope
    in myself. Because he may have beliefs that don't match mine should be of little importance, and in
    fact, should also be appreciated as a good role model, one who believes what they believe indpendent
    of those around him. Sorry Mr. Raptor, I just don't agree with you.

    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove ".nospam" to reply)
     
  18. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Craig Brossman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Raptor wrote:
    >
    > > Sorni wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >>
    > >>> Paladin wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    > >>>> overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda
    > >>>> talk from me about
    any
    > >>>> other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> Paladin
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> But he ain't no saint. He's an actual, everyday dude from a poor
    family
    > >>> who made his own way. This limits his utility as a role model for (some) children.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Um, how?
    > >>
    > >> While I agree L.A.'s hardly perfect -- I'm sure he can be arrogant, self-centered, demanding,
    > >> etc. -- his story and achievements are what serve as inspirations.
    > >>
    > >> I don't see how being "an everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way" limits his
    > >> "utility as a role model". Quite the opposite, one
    would
    > >> think. (And hope.)
    > >>
    > >> Just trying to get your point.
    > >>
    > >> Bill
    > >
    > >
    > > A hint: I live in Utah, and have for many years.
    > >
    > > I probably should have mentioned his potty mouth (not too bad by most standards) and
    > > agnosticism.
    > >
    > > I for one respect the hell out of the guy.
    > >
    > You're scaring me here. Why is it he has limited "utility as a role model"? Because you have heard
    > him swear and he may not believe in God. I suppose one decides on role models based on their own
    > personal beliefs. I for one would like my kids to group up with a similar work ethic and
    > appreciation for those around him who helped him get there. Listening to Mr. Armstrong's
    > interviews on OLN recently, I really appreciate his attitude. He comes across as one who never
    > blames others for his problems, understands he has good and bad days, realizes that although this
    > is important, it is just a game. These are traits I want my childern to have and would like to
    > continue to develope in myself. Because he may have beliefs that don't match mine should be of
    > little importance, and in fact, should also be appreciated as a good role model, one who believes
    > what they believe indpendent of those around him. Sorry Mr. Raptor, I just don't agree with you.

    Not to speak for the Rapstor, Craig, but I think he was commenting/slagging on UTAH-ians'
    holier-than-Lance attitudes, not his own. I didn't get it first time, either.

    Bill "oops, I'm not doing this any more" S.
     
  19. Sorni wrote:
    > "Craig Brossman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    >
    >>Raptor wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Sorni wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Paladin wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    >>>>>>overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda
    >>>>>>talk from me about
    >
    > any
    >
    >>>>>>other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Paladin
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>But he ain't no saint. He's an actual, everyday dude from a poor
    >
    > family
    >
    >>>>>who made his own way. This limits his utility as a role model for (some) children.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Um, how?
    >>>>
    >>>>While I agree L.A.'s hardly perfect -- I'm sure he can be arrogant, self-centered, demanding,
    >>>>etc. -- his story and achievements are what serve as inspirations.
    >>>>
    >>>>I don't see how being "an everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way" limits his
    >>>>"utility as a role model". Quite the opposite, one
    >
    > would
    >
    >>>>think. (And hope.)
    >>>>
    >>>>Just trying to get your point.
    >>>>
    >>>>Bill
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>A hint: I live in Utah, and have for many years.
    >>>
    >>>I probably should have mentioned his potty mouth (not too bad by most standards) and agnosticism.
    >>>
    >>>I for one respect the hell out of the guy.
    >>>
    >>
    >>You're scaring me here. Why is it he has limited "utility as a role model"? Because you have heard
    >>him swear and he may not believe in God. I suppose one decides on role models based on their own
    >>personal beliefs. I for one would like my kids to group up with a similar work ethic and
    >>appreciation for those around him who helped him get there. Listening to Mr. Armstrong's
    >>interviews on OLN recently, I really appreciate his attitude. He comes across as one who never
    >>blames others for his problems, understands he has good and bad days, realizes that although this
    >>is important, it is just a game. These are traits I want my childern to have and would like to
    >>continue to develope in myself. Because he may have beliefs that don't match mine should be of
    >>little importance, and in fact, should also be appreciated as a good role model, one who believes
    >>what they believe indpendent of those around him. Sorry Mr. Raptor, I just don't agree with you.
    >
    >
    > Not to speak for the Rapstor, Craig, but I think he was commenting/slagging on UTAH-ians'
    > holier-than-Lance attitudes, not his own. I didn't get it first time, either.
    >
    > Bill "oops, I'm not doing this any more" S.
    >
    >
    Thanks Mr. Bill. Perhaps you are correct and I have missed the point. Mr. Raptor "seems" to make the
    statement that "it limits his utility ...", I just want to point out that I think Mr. Armstrong has
    sufficient utility as a role model, perhaps not in every area, but then again a hammer has utility
    but I never use it to cook. If I took it all wrong Mr. Raptor, sorry, otherwise I'm not.

    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove ".nospam" to reply)
     
  20. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Craig Brossman wrote:
    > Raptor wrote:
    >
    >> Sorni wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>>> Paladin wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Unlike most sports champions, Lance is a great role model, and when you consider what he's
    >>>>> overcome, and how he's done it, and where's he gotten, even a hero. You won't hear that kinda
    >>>>> talk from me about any other GR's, but Lance is the true exception to the rule.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Paladin
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> But he ain't no saint. He's an actual, everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way.
    >>>> This limits his utility as a role model for (some) children.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Um, how?
    >>>
    >>> While I agree L.A.'s hardly perfect -- I'm sure he can be arrogant, self-centered, demanding,
    >>> etc. -- his story and achievements are what serve as inspirations.
    >>>
    >>> I don't see how being "an everyday dude from a poor family who made his own way" limits his
    >>> "utility as a role model". Quite the opposite, one would think. (And hope.)
    >>>
    >>> Just trying to get your point.
    >>>
    >>> Bill
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> A hint: I live in Utah, and have for many years.
    >>
    >> I probably should have mentioned his potty mouth (not too bad by most standards) and agnosticism.
    >>
    >> I for one respect the hell out of the guy.
    >>
    > You're scaring me here. Why is it he has limited "utility as a role model"? Because you have heard
    > him swear and he may not believe in God. I suppose one decides on role models based on their own
    > personal beliefs. I for one would like my kids to group up with a similar work ethic and
    > appreciation for those around him who helped him get there. Listening to Mr. Armstrong's
    > interviews on OLN recently, I really appreciate his attitude. He comes across as one who never
    > blames others for his problems, understands he has good and bad days, realizes that although this
    > is important, it is just a game.

    When/if I have kids, I'll ask them to work and live to the standards set by LANCE Armstrong and John
    Stockton, plus any non-sports heroes I can think of (certain firefighters, doctors, the usual).

    > These are traits I want my childern to have and would like to continue to develope in myself.
    > Because he may have beliefs that don't match mine should be of little importance, and in fact,
    > should also be appreciated as a good role model, one who believes what they believe indpendent of
    > those around him. Sorry Mr. Raptor, I just don't agree with you.

    I know I'm not communicating it all that clearly. I meant that many don't consider LANCE to be a
    useful role model simply because he's a real guy. I don't agree with them.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
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