Land Rider - just plain bad...

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bill H., Aug 6, 2005.

  1. Bill H.

    Bill H. Guest

    I was up late and came across an infomercial for a Land Rider - the
    bike with automatic transmission.

    The people selling this should be stabbed. And the people buying it
    will have more than enough punishment if they actually decide to keep
    it, rather than return the damned thing.

    Some folks on here have already noticed this contraption. For those
    who don't know, it's basically, it's a comfort bike with automatic
    transmission that sells for $400 plus shipping and handling.

    The features they seem to sell is how fun and easy these bikes are to
    ride.

    One problem I noticed is that the seat is one of these "comfortable
    seats" that is "extra wide". They even had folks on there complaining
    about the discomfort from a normal bicycle seat. One guy says that a
    normal bike saddle is "like sitting on a rock." He described the Land
    Rider saddle as "sitting on air!"

    Also, for only an extra $100, they'll throw on a suspension seat post,
    a "genuine SHIMANO derailer" (no mention of the model, of course), and
    a height-adjustable stem. There are a few other goodies, none of which
    are worth an extra $100.

    They show people riding around bike paths (all wearing helmets, of
    course), the mountains, city streets, and there's even a fellow with
    panniers strapped all over it, ready to take it for a cross-country
    jaunt.

    While I'd love to see more people out bicycling, the level of deception
    they're going to to sell these things is atrocious. The suspension
    fork looks like a Wal-Mart brand with maybe 20mm of travel.

    Then they have their LandRider ELITE - which just has to be seen to be
    believed. This one tops the price range at about $600. And it's "ONLY
    29 POUNDS!" -
    http://www.healthandbeautydirect.com/landrider/landrider-elite.html

    They also claim it's safer than a manual-shift bike, because you won't
    be "distracted" by making gear changes and take your eyes off the road.
    And their website uses very tricky wording when dancing around how
    fast the bike is, and are careful to mention that it's not meant for
    serious off-road riding.

    None of this would be verified by anyone who knows ANYTHING about
    bicyling, but they're counting on their audience to be dumb and take
    their word for it.

    A fool and his money...and all that, but selling an overpriced,
    gimmicky piece of crap is just wrong.
     
    Tags:


  2. Brian Wax

    Brian Wax Guest

    Now really! This bike is perfect for the TV Guide subscriber and those who
    get their news from the tabloids. Thinking is not a critical competency for
    these folks.


    "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 08:46:30 -0700, Will wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Bill H. wrote:
    >>
    >>> A fool and his money...and all that, but selling an overpriced, gimmicky
    >>> piece of crap is just wrong.

    >>
    >> Watched any car adverts lately?

    >
    > "Not more than you need, just more than you're used to"
    >
    > Ahhhh, yankee gluttony.
    >
    > Those landriders are a joke. As I've said before, if you could walk into
    > the average bike shop or Xmart and get a normal internally geared bike
    > with 7 evenly spaced ratios--like any place in Europe--the market for the
    > "landrider" simply wouldn't exist. It's an artificial solution to a fake
    > problem.
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    >> On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 08:46:30 -0700, Will wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Bill H. wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> A fool and his money...and all that, but selling an overpriced,
    >>>> gimmicky
    >>>> piece of crap is just wrong.
    >>>
    >>> Watched any car adverts lately?

    >>
    >> "Not more than you need, just more than you're used to"
    >>
    >> Ahhhh, yankee gluttony.
    >>
    >> Those landriders are a joke. As I've said before, if you could walk into
    >> the average bike shop or Xmart and get a normal internally geared bike
    >> with 7 evenly spaced ratios--like any place in Europe--the market for the
    >> "landrider" simply wouldn't exist. It's an artificial solution to a fake
    >> problem.

    >
    > It bugs me that the Landrider people portray shifting as such a complex
    > affair. Back in the day when I was friction shifting with DT shifters,
    > maybe. But in the age of indexed shifting and integrated shifters, it's
    > not difficult. If anything, it's TOO easy to shift.

    You have to shift a LandRider also.
     
  4. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Aspiring Tortoise" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:p[email protected]
    >>> On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 08:46:30 -0700, Will wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Bill H. wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> A fool and his money...and all that, but selling an overpriced,
    >>>>> gimmicky
    >>>>> piece of crap is just wrong.
    >>>>
    >>>> Watched any car adverts lately?
    >>>
    >>> "Not more than you need, just more than you're used to"
    >>>
    >>> Ahhhh, yankee gluttony.
    >>>
    >>> Those landriders are a joke. As I've said before, if you could walk into
    >>> the average bike shop or Xmart and get a normal internally geared bike
    >>> with 7 evenly spaced ratios--like any place in Europe--the market for
    >>> the
    >>> "landrider" simply wouldn't exist. It's an artificial solution to a fake
    >>> problem.

    >>
    >> It bugs me that the Landrider people portray shifting as such a complex
    >> affair. Back in the day when I was friction shifting with DT shifters,
    >> maybe. But in the age of indexed shifting and integrated shifters, it's
    >> not difficult. If anything, it's TOO easy to shift.

    > You have to shift a LandRider also.

    Well, just the front derailleur. I'm sure lots of people keep it in the
    middle ring and never shift, though.
     
  5. littledog

    littledog Guest

    My Schwinn Cruiser Deluxe only weighs 50 pounds. I am not ready to
    take a cross country trip on it yet though. 50 miles in one day is the
    farthest I have gone so far. Also it looks a lot classier that the Land
    Rover does. And shifting the 7 speed Shimano internal geared hub is not
    all that difficult. It's easier than using a front derailer as that
    requires some thought due to overlapping gear ratios and all that high
    faluten stuff. And I think mine has a better seat. And it already comes
    with a light on the fender as well as a horn. And has TWO fenders that
    actually work and look neat. Unlike the one dumb looking fender on the
    Land Rover. And it has a springer front end that not only looks sharp
    but works pretty well. And it has a luggage rack so I have a place to
    put my air pump and bike tools and spare tube and patch kit,which I
    keep in a small travel bag. A lot of people say to me "They sure don't
    make them like that anymore". If more people knew about the Schwinn
    Cruisers they would sell a lot more of them. At the same time there is
    obviously a market for the Land Rover-Oops,I mean Land Rider or they
    would of quit infomercializing it a long time ago. Not that I watch
    infomercials but obviously someone does. So someone and his wife buys a
    couple of them and sell them at a garage sale after they have ridden
    twice in 5 years.
    littledog
     
  6. On 6 Aug 2005 03:05:01 -0700, Bill H. wrote:

    > The people selling this should be stabbed. And the people buying it
    > will have more than enough punishment if they actually decide to keep
    > it, rather than return the damned thing.


    In a world drowning in car ads that pretty much advocate using them
    to push anything smaller off the road, I find it pretty hard to get
    worked up about this.

    Course, I'm a roadie, and have no idea what they ought to be paying
    for rubbish like suspension and fat tyres, anyway :)

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  7. mo fo

    mo fo Guest

    Dang! You can get a very nice Trek for less money! But you'd have
    to actually shift the gears yourself, thereby endangering your
    life with such a big "distraction". How 'bout getting a moped or
    a scooter instead? then you wouldn't have to be distracted with
    pedaling, either?

    ~Rob

    "Bill H." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    : I was up late and came across an infomercial for a Land Rider -
    the
    : bike with automatic transmission.
    :
    : The people selling this should be stabbed. And the people
    buying it
    : will have more than enough punishment if they actually decide
    to keep
    : it, rather than return the damned thing.
    :
    : Some folks on here have already noticed this contraption. For
    those
    : who don't know, it's basically, it's a comfort bike with
    automatic
    : transmission that sells for $400 plus shipping and handling.
    :
    : The features they seem to sell is how fun and easy these bikes
    are to
    : ride.
    :
    : One problem I noticed is that the seat is one of these
    "comfortable
    : seats" that is "extra wide". They even had folks on there
    complaining
    : about the discomfort from a normal bicycle seat. One guy says
    that a
    : normal bike saddle is "like sitting on a rock." He described
    the Land
    : Rider saddle as "sitting on air!"
    :
    : Also, for only an extra $100, they'll throw on a suspension
    seat post,
    : a "genuine SHIMANO derailer" (no mention of the model, of
    course), and
    : a height-adjustable stem. There are a few other goodies, none
    of which
    : are worth an extra $100.
    :
    : They show people riding around bike paths (all wearing helmets,
    of
    : course), the mountains, city streets, and there's even a fellow
    with
    : panniers strapped all over it, ready to take it for a
    cross-country
    : jaunt.
    :
    : While I'd love to see more people out bicycling, the level of
    deception
    : they're going to to sell these things is atrocious. The
    suspension
    : fork looks like a Wal-Mart brand with maybe 20mm of travel.
    :
    : Then they have their LandRider ELITE - which just has to be
    seen to be
    : believed. This one tops the price range at about $600. And
    it's "ONLY
    : 29 POUNDS!" -
    :
    http://www.healthandbeautydirect.com/landrider/landrider-elite.html
    :
    : They also claim it's safer than a manual-shift bike, because
    you won't
    : be "distracted" by making gear changes and take your eyes off
    the road.
    : And their website uses very tricky wording when dancing around
    how
    : fast the bike is, and are careful to mention that it's not
    meant for
    : serious off-road riding.
    :
    : None of this would be verified by anyone who knows ANYTHING
    about
    : bicyling, but they're counting on their audience to be dumb and
    take
    : their word for it.
    :
    : A fool and his money...and all that, but selling an overpriced,
    : gimmicky piece of crap is just wrong.
    :
     
  8. The Wogster

    The Wogster Guest

    Bill H. wrote:
    > I was up late and came across an infomercial for a Land Rider - the
    > bike with automatic transmission.
    >
    > The people selling this should be stabbed. And the people buying it
    > will have more than enough punishment if they actually decide to keep
    > it, rather than return the damned thing.
    >


    It may also be, that some people will buy these, and decide to trade it
    on a real bike.

    > Some folks on here have already noticed this contraption. For those
    > who don't know, it's basically, it's a comfort bike with automatic
    > transmission that sells for $400 plus shipping and handling.


    Bikes don't have transmissions, the Land Rider has a deraileur, which is
    a very different mechanism, calling it a transmission, just means the
    marketing guy is a dumbass......

    > The features they seem to sell is how fun and easy these bikes are to
    > ride.
    >
    > One problem I noticed is that the seat is one of these "comfortable
    > seats" that is "extra wide". They even had folks on there complaining
    > about the discomfort from a normal bicycle seat. One guy says that a
    > normal bike saddle is "like sitting on a rock." He described the Land
    > Rider saddle as "sitting on air!"


    Unless you try their saddle, who knows, although, extra wide, implies
    it's better for lard butts, except that weight gain, doesn't move the
    sit bones.....

    > While I'd love to see more people out bicycling, the level of deception
    > they're going to to sell these things is atrocious. The suspension
    > fork looks like a Wal-Mart brand with maybe 20mm of travel.
    >
    > Then they have their LandRider ELITE - which just has to be seen to be
    > believed. This one tops the price range at about $600. And it's "ONLY
    > 29 POUNDS!" -
    > http://www.healthandbeautydirect.com/landrider/landrider-elite.html


    This bikes competition is the Wally-mart bike, people who want real
    bikes will go to a proper bike shop.....

    > They also claim it's safer than a manual-shift bike, because you won't
    > be "distracted" by making gear changes and take your eyes off the road.
    > And their website uses very tricky wording when dancing around how
    > fast the bike is, and are careful to mention that it's not meant for
    > serious off-road riding.


    I never found gear changes an issue, it's like driving a car with a
    stick (been there), after a while, you get used to it, and forget that
    your doing it..... This would be what they call a sales gimmick....

    > None of this would be verified by anyone who knows ANYTHING about
    > bicyling, but they're counting on their audience to be dumb and take
    > their word for it.


    The people who would buy it, would alternately buy something at Xmart or
    a hardware store..... Like I said at the beginning, some people will
    enjoy the fresh air, and stress relieving properties of cycling, and
    later trade it in, on a real bike, at a bike shop. I expect to see, in
    a few years a few of these found when dumpster diving behind an LBS.....

    W
     
  9. Rich

    Rich Guest

    The Wogster wrote:

    > Bikes don't have transmissions,


    Bikes with the shifting mechanism in the rear hub do.
     
  10. Ed

    Ed Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Gooserider says...

    >It bugs me that the Landrider people portray shifting as such a complex
    >affair. Back in the day when I was friction shifting with DT shifters,
    >maybe. But in the age of indexed shifting and integrated shifters, it's not
    >difficult. If anything, it's TOO easy to shift.
    >
    >

    An echo from the 1950's when automatic transmissions for cars were becomming
    common. Luddite.
     
  11. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Gooserider
    > says...
    >
    >>It bugs me that the Landrider people portray shifting as such a complex
    >>affair. Back in the day when I was friction shifting with DT shifters,
    >>maybe. But in the age of indexed shifting and integrated shifters, it's
    >>not
    >>difficult. If anything, it's TOO easy to shift.
    >>
    >>

    > An echo from the 1950's when automatic transmissions for cars were
    > becomming
    > common. Luddite.


    Yes, I am a Luddite. I drive a car with a 5 speed stick, two of my bikes are
    steel, and one has barcons(with friction front, even). :)
     
  12. The Wogster

    The Wogster Guest

    Rich wrote:
    > The Wogster wrote:
    >
    >> Bikes don't have transmissions,

    >
    >
    > Bikes with the shifting mechanism in the rear hub do.


    A gear hub is similar to a transmission, very similar mechanically, but
    the Land Rider, has a deraileur mechanism, and that isn't a
    transmission, so the marketing guy is still a dumbass.

    W
     
  13. mo fo wrote:
    > Dang! You can get a very nice Trek for less money! But you'd have
    > to actually shift the gears yourself, thereby endangering your
    > life with such a big "distraction". How 'bout getting a moped or
    > a scooter instead? then you wouldn't have to be distracted with
    > pedaling, either?


    Around here, Landrider has become an all purpose term for a sort of
    pedestrian cruiser used by people who ride twice a month on the bikepath.

    A friend of mine who works in a bike shop says people are coming in and
    asking for electric bikes and tricycles, and getting all miffed when
    they say they don't hve them. "Well why not? you SHOULD!"

    There used to be this sort of Fred bike shop nearby called "Lazy
    walker". I used to call it "Funky walker dirty talker."
     
  14. Rich

    Rich Guest

    The Wogster wrote:

    > A gear hub is similar to a transmission, very similar mechanically,


    A gear hub IS a transmission.

    > the Land Rider, has a deraileur mechanism, and that isn't a
    > transmission, so the marketing guy is still a dumbass.


    Not if he sells bikes.
     
  15. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Ed wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Gooserider says...
    >
    >
    >>It bugs me that the Landrider people portray shifting as such a complex
    >>affair. Back in the day when I was friction shifting with DT shifters,
    >>maybe. But in the age of indexed shifting and integrated shifters, it's not
    >>difficult. If anything, it's TOO easy to shift.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > An echo from the 1950's when automatic transmissions for cars were becomming
    > common. Luddite.
    >


    I took one of these bikes from the curb on trash day. It was hardly used
    (surprise!) and I figured there'd be some salvageable parts. This was
    the prior version, "AutoBike", I'm assuming the mechanism is similar.
    The bike used (3 large) weights on the spokes to actuate the rear
    derailer. The hub was non-freewheeling, the freewheel mechanism was in
    the crank. I didn't try to make the bike operable, so I have no
    first-hand report of how well it actually shifted, but to call the
    mechanism Rube Goldberg would be charitable. It was also *very* heavy.

    The components were of a much lower quality than you'd find on a $250
    LBS bike. Nothing was really worth salvaging. The frame and fork were
    interesting because, other than being gas pipe with *really* sloppy
    welds, were sized for 26" wheels, had cantilever studs and mounting
    inserts for racks and fenders. I populated it with MTB components and
    made a cheap "city bike" out of it for my wife to commute with. When
    people ask her what brand it is, she tells them it's an "Eight" (upscale
    from a Seven). I've been thinking about getting a head badge from the
    hardware store.

    The power source for automatic-shifting bikes is the real problem, that
    and a compact, light and reliable mechanism. The "AutoBike/Land Rider"
    bikes don't solve the problem. Whether the problem needs to be solved is
    another question. A lot of new riders seem to be confused by 2 shifters
    and the issue of gear overlaps. A shifting hub is probably a much better
    solution for them. For the type of riders/riding in the TV infomercials,
    a single-speed with hub brake is probably a good match.
     
  16. Will

    Will Guest

    I suppose an old Western Flyer type, single speed/coaster brake, might
    work out. But I cannot understand why a smart outfit wouldn't
    re-introduce something like the old 3-speed Raleigh Tourist. You've
    seen these: fenders, willow basket, Chinese bell... Pashley is probably
    still making one.

    I agree with the OP, why sell a piece of sh-t when you can sell
    "tradition" that really offers value. My LBS carries a close knock-off
    to this style that is made in India. It is way cool. L o n g wheelbase,
    lots of fork rake, seat rail springs, like the old B17's. With a good
    front "butcher's" rack it would be a great short hop transporter.
     
  17. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 15:41:12 -0700, Will wrote:

    > My LBS carries a close knock-off to
    > this style that is made in India. It is way cool. L o n g wheelbase, lots
    > of fork rake, seat rail springs, like the old B17's. With a good front
    > "butcher's" rack it would be a great short hop transporter.


    I got the bike that's based on, a '73 Raleigh Tourist. I guess mine would
    be one of the 'newer' bikes as they've been made since the jazz age or
    therebouts. Awesome city cruiser. Godawful brakes. The S/A hub asks for a
    drop of motor oil each month or two. Nice.

    If you like that, but want fancier, then you want a Swedish Skeppshult.
    http://www.skeppshultcykeln.com/

    It's probably my 500th article saying this, but it pisses me off
    exceptionally that you can't go into a bike shop and get a 700c wheeled
    internally geared bike. I can't even think of any bike available in the US
    with the 700/internal spec, short of specially ordering one of those
    Miyata/Kiyoga city bikes from Harris.

    The closest we get here in the US to an affordable "plain" bike--like the
    old Raleighs, is the Breezer Freedom:

    $450
    http://www.breezerbikes.com/bike_details.cfm?bikeType=town&frame=d&bike=freedom

    I can get a similar bike in England or Sweden for $200 at the local
    sportmart--it's not going to be as nice as the Breezer, but good enough.
    This type of bike shouldn't cost more than $300 if it's specced with
    generic parts.

    Who wants to order a container load of these from Taiwan with me? :D
     
  18. MrSammysDad

    MrSammysDad New Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    What would you recommend? I don't want to be Lance Armstrong, just get a little exercise and as a kid never had a bike with gears, so this bike has some attractive features. How about some positive solutions?
     
  19. qdc15

    qdc15 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Messages:
    269
    Likes Received:
    12
    Visit some bike shops, look around, ask questions. Shifting gears isn't so hard. You can do it. You might prefer an internally geared hub (IGH) bike vs. a bike with derailleurs. Just one lever and you can shift while stopped.
     
  20. MrSammysDad

    MrSammysDad New Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
Loading...
Loading...