LandRider/AutoShift bikes

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bookdude2003, Apr 20, 2003.

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  1. Bookdude2003

    Bookdude2003 Guest

    I don't know if this topic has been debated here before but....

    I was flipping thru the tv a while ago, and came across an infomercial about the LandRider autoshift
    bike. They made it out to be the best thing to the bike since rubber tires were invented.

    My question is...is this bike as good as they claim? Does anyone have any experience with this bike?

    Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    AJC
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (BookDude2003) wrote:

    > I don't know if this topic has been debated here before but....
    >
    > I was flipping thru the tv a while ago, and came across an infomercial about the LandRider
    > autoshift bike. They made it out to be the best thing to the bike since rubber tires were
    > invented.
    >
    > My question is...is this bike as good as they claim? Does anyone have any experience with
    > this bike?
    >
    > Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    The consensus is that these things are terrible. Apparently, they are not very well-made, which is
    strike one against them. The other thing you have to understand is that an autoshifting bicycle
    equates to unexpected shifting, and unexpected shifting on a bike is a real pain.

    More importantly, bike shifting is no longer hard, even if it might have qualified as that 20 years
    ago in the era of non-indexed downtube shifters. Indexing and a wide variety of excellent shifter
    mechanisms make shifting about the easiest thing to do on a bike.

    If you want really easy shifting, probably the best bet is something like a Shimano Nexus 7-speed
    hub shifter. Easy action, lots of gears, and you can shift even when stopped.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  3. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "BookDude2003" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I don't know if this topic has been debated here before but....

    Very often, in fact.

    General consensus: there's a reason why you don't get to look at the bike until you've already
    paid for it.
     
  4. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Ryan Cousineau wrote:
    > ... If you want really easy shifting, probably the best bet is something like a Shimano Nexus
    > 7-speed hub shifter. Easy action, lots of gears, and you can shift even when stopped.

    I have been informed by a LBS owner that the SRAM Spectro 7 is better than the Shimano Nexus 7 in
    both durability and gear ratio selection.

    Any other opinions?

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    Tom Sherman <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ryan Cousineau wrote:
    > > ... If you want really easy shifting, probably the best bet is something like a Shimano Nexus
    > > 7-speed hub shifter. Easy action, lots of gears, and you can shift even when stopped.
    >
    > I have been informed by a LBS owner that the SRAM Spectro 7 is better than the Shimano Nexus 7 in
    > both durability and gear ratio selection.
    >
    > Any other opinions?
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    That may well be true. I have no first-hand experience of hub gearing, but threw out the Nexus as a
    widely-available option. The top of the heap, both in function and price, is probably the 14-speed
    Rohloff hub. Very cool, verrry expensive.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/rohloff.html

    Prices start at a heart-stopping US$800.

    Admittedly, this equates to purchasing a rear hub and entire drivetrain (except the cranks and front
    ring), and the price includes a shifter.

    But it's still US$800! You can get a pretty nice bike for that kind of coin. Like maybe a
    Tiagra-equipped road machine if you shop around.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  6. Gregr

    Gregr Guest

    On 20 Apr 2003 16:44:55 GMT, [email protected] (BookDude2003) wrote:

    >I don't know if this topic has been debated here before but....
    >
    >I was flipping thru the tv a while ago, and came across an infomercial about the LandRider
    >autoshift bike. They made it out to be the best thing to the bike since rubber tires were invented.
    >
    >My question is...is this bike as good as they claim? Does anyone have any experience with
    >this bike?
    >
    >Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    I would hate to be standing on the pedals when this thing decides to shift.....

    G
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > (BookDude2003) wrote:
    >
    > > I don't know if this topic has been debated here before but....
    > >
    > > I was flipping thru the tv a while ago, and came across an infomercial about the LandRider
    > > autoshift bike. They made it out to be the best thing to the bike since rubber tires were
    > > invented.
    > >
    > > My question is...is this bike as good as they claim? Does anyone have any experience with
    > > this bike?
    > >
    > > Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    >
    > The consensus is that these things are terrible. Apparently, they are not very well-made, which is
    > strike one against them. The other thing you have to understand is that an autoshifting bicycle
    > equates to unexpected shifting, and unexpected shifting on a bike is a real pain.
    >

    I've heard the same thing. These bikes are made like total crap, weigh a ton and when they break,
    it's nearly impossible to find parts for them. Also, for that price, you can actually get a decent
    mountain bike or hybrid (not top of the line, natch). You may as well get an exercycle. You'll get a
    better workout!
     
  8. On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 14:15:33 +0000, Tom Sherman wrote:

    >
    > Ryan Cousineau wrote:
    >> ... If you want really easy shifting, probably the best bet is something like a Shimano Nexus
    >> 7-speed hub shifter. Easy action, lots of gears, and you can shift even when stopped.
    >
    > I have been informed by a LBS owner that the SRAM Spectro 7 is better than the Shimano Nexus 7 in
    > both durability and gear ratio selection.
    >
    > Any other opinions?

    I have no opinion on the relative merits of one system over another. But, a few years ago at a bike
    repair clinic, this one "student" came up to me to ask me to show her how to change a flat on her
    bike. It had one of these internal-geared hubs. Very messy operation just to remove the wheel, and
    it was not clear whether the shifter adjustment could be easily restored. I suggested she carry a
    patch kit and patch the tube with the wheel on the bike.

    Maybe removing/replacing the wheel was easier than it looked? If not, that is a serious downside.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | What is objectionable, and what is dangerous about extremists is _`\(,_ | not that they are
    extreme, but that they are intolerant. (_)/ (_) | --Robert F. Kennedy
     
  9. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >I don't know if this topic has been debated here before but....
    >

    This topic has been discussed here several times but never debated. Everyone seems in agreement that
    these bikes are POJs and that with advent of index shifting nearly 20 years ago, the concerns that
    these bikes purport to address have long been resolved.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  10. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    "David L. Johnson" wrote:
    >
    > I have no opinion on the relative merits of one system over another. But, a few years ago at a
    > bike repair clinic, this one "student" came up to me to ask me to show her how to change a flat on
    > her bike. It had one of these internal-geared hubs. Very messy operation just to remove the wheel,
    > and it was not clear whether the shifter adjustment could be easily restored. I suggested she
    > carry a patch kit and patch the tube with the wheel on the bike.
    >
    > Maybe removing/replacing the wheel was easier than it looked? If not, that is a serious downside.

    I have a bike with a SRAM (nee Sachs) Spectro 3x7 hub and it is not that much more difficult to
    remove the wheel than with a regular QR rear hub. It is more time consuming and requires a wrench
    for the hub nuts (I use a Park "Peanut Butter" wrench).

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  11. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "David L. Johnson" wrote:
    > >
    > > I have no opinion on the relative merits of one system over another.
    But,
    > > a few years ago at a bike repair clinic, this one "student" came up to
    me
    > > to ask me to show her how to change a flat on her bike. It had one of these internal-geared
    > > hubs. Very messy operation just to remove the wheel, and it was not clear whether the shifter
    > > adjustment could be
    easily
    > > restored. I suggested she carry a patch kit and patch the tube with the wheel on the bike.
    > >
    > > Maybe removing/replacing the wheel was easier than it looked? If not, that is a serious
    > > downside.
    >
    > I have a bike with a SRAM (nee Sachs) Spectro 3x7 hub and it is not that much more difficult to
    > remove the wheel than with a regular QR rear hub. It is more time consuming and requires a wrench
    > for the hub nuts (I use a Park "Peanut Butter" wrench).

    I'm on both sides of this issue. I have a Sachs 3x7 hub, and agree with Tom. On the other hand, I
    recently fixed up a bike for my daughter that had a 3-speed S-A hub and a coaster brake, so there's
    a lot going on around the rear axle. I decided that if she ever got a flat, she was unlikely to
    remember how to fix it, or to be carrying the right tools. So, I put both a
    Mr. Tuffy liner and a thorn proof tube in there.
     
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