landrider

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by -, May 7, 2004.

  1. jj3pa

    jj3pa Guest

    BanditManDan wrote:
    > First let me say that I'm glad that your happy with your landrider and
    > arent just using it for garage decorations. But let me explain the
    > reason for the negative comments. The comments come from experience,
    > perhaps not first hand experience but experience just the same. I have
    > ridden enough bikes over the years to know what features are important
    > and which are just pure marketing hype. Shifting is not a big problem on
    > todays average bike and adding a auto-shifting derailer is just another
    > thing that will eventually need adjusting/fixing.
    > You also mentioned that your cadence ranges from 35 to 70 rpm's, but
    > what about people with bad knee's? I personally will get pain in my
    > knees if I pedal slower than 70 rpm's for extended periods of time. In
    > my case the auto-shifting bike would make biking painful an thus prevent
    > me from riding for more that about 30 minutes a day.
    > Since your a video professional I would hope that you would give an
    > honest opinion when someone asks for it. For example, I'm planning on
    > buying an expensive digital camera ($1000). Perhaps you could tell me if
    > it's worth the money. It has 640 x 480 resolution (low I know) but I
    > really like this new "auto" zoom feature. I would like to take pictures
    > mainly for my family albumn and perhaps my bike clubs news letter.
    > Should I buy it?
    > Enjoy your riding :)
    > Dan.





    I'm curious ... have you ever actually seen one in person ? Not the
    autobike, which from what I understand had parts that weren't as good as
    what they are putting in the landrider.

    Even if its easier to shift from one gear to another, it is still
    daunting to some to know when to shift or what to shift to .. How do you
    explain to a new person what is first, second .. etc on a bike with 6 on
    the back and 3 on the front (18) ? That part still isnt simple.



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  2. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "jj3pa" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Even if its easier to shift from one gear to another, it is still
    > daunting to some to know when to shift or what to shift to .. How do you
    > explain to a new person what is first, second .. etc on a bike with 6 on
    > the back and 3 on the front (18) ? That part still isnt simple.


    I've instructed a couple of newbies (kids, first time adults) thusly:

    1. Normal riding, leave it in the middle up front.
    2. Make gross changes with the front rings (Uphill = smaller, downhills =
    larger)
    3. Adjust up and down with the back. If it's getting too hard to pedal, go
    to the next bigger one in the back. Too easy to pedal? Go to the next
    smaller.
    - Due to the instant feedback through the feet and legs (pedalling way too
    hard or easy), they know instantly if they've shifted to the wrong gear.
    ("Brain - Don't do that next time!")

    They figure it out soon enough.

    Pete
     
  3. Raoul Duke

    Raoul Duke Guest

    "jj3pa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Even if its easier to shift from one gear to another, it is still
    > daunting to some to know when to shift or what to shift to .. How do you
    > explain to a new person what is first, second .. etc on a bike with 6 on
    > the back and 3 on the front (18) ? That part still isnt simple.


    Gimme a break. If shifting gears on a bicycle is too tough for you, have
    one of the eight year olds in your neighborhood explain it to you.

    Dave
     
  4. BanditManDan

    BanditManDan Guest

    Pete wrote:
    > "jj3pa" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > Even if its easier to shift from one gear to another, it is still
    > > daunting to some to know when to shift or what to shift to .. How
    > > do you explain to a new person what is first, second .. etc on a
    > > bike with 6 on the back and 3 on the front (18) ? That part still
    > > isnt simple.

    > I've instructed a couple of newbies (kids, first time adults) thusly:
    > 1. Normal riding, leave it in the middle up front.
    > 2. Make gross changes with the front rings (Uphill = smaller,
    > downhills = larger)
    > 3. Adjust up and down with the back. If it's getting too hard to pedal,
    > go to the next bigger one in the back. Too easy to pedal? Go to the
    > next smaller.
    > - Due to the instant feedback through the feet and legs (pedalling way
    > too hard or easy), they know instantly if they've shifted to the wrong
    > gear. ("Brain - Don't do that next time!")
    > They figure it out soon enough.
    > Pete




    I think this pretty much sums up what I wanted to say. I was able to
    teach my kids how to shift with no problems at around the age of 7. But
    I do think my kids are gifted, or at least smarter than most of the
    adult population. ;)

    Dan.



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  5. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    Does the Landrider understand about headwinds and hills, or does it select a
    gear based on what some absentee designer thought would be best "on
    average?"
     
  6. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Does the Landrider understand about headwinds and hills, or does it select a
    > gear based on what some absentee designer thought would be best "on
    > average?"


    It understands your speed, is all. When you slow down, it shifts down.


    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
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