[langtitle=sv]Scott cr1 comp[/langtitle]

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by greger, May 31, 2010.

  1. greger

    greger New Member

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    [lang=sv]Hej!

    Jag är en nybörjare som letar efter en bra cykel att träna med.

    Jag har trillat över en Scott cr1 comp som jag kan få för en bra peng - ca 14,000.
    http://www.cykloteket.se/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=12339
    Mina tankar går såhär...
    Det som nappar på den cykeln är att den är helt i kolfiber och att den då kmr vara lite "livligare" än en aluminium ram.

    Innan har jag bara kört på en gammal 80tals stål racer..

    Men det som är mindre bra med cykeln är att det sitter tiagra komponenter på..
    Hjulen har jag också läst om att det är standard-instegs hju
    l.
    Är detta mycket negativt eller är det ändå en bra cykel för pengen?


    Köpa en instegs-kolfiber cykel eller gå ner till aluminium med bra komponenter??:confused::)[/lang]
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    The CR1 frame is quite the hotrod of entry-level carbon frames, and Shimano R500 wheels are well made and reliable, my favorite choice for everyday wheels. To me it is more sensible to by the bike with normal wheels and select lightweight wheels after you have been riding the bike for a while.

    My only reservation about the bike is the 9-speed Tiagra shifters. Tiagra works fine, but if you ever want to convert to 10-speed the new control levers will be expensive.
     
  3. greger

    greger New Member

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    [lang=sv]Tack för svaret!
    Vad menas med 9-hastighet och 10-hastighet på växlarna?
    Vad blir det i praktiken?

    Tycker du att det är värt att lägga en liten till slant att få en kolfiber ram, även fast jag är iprincip nybörjare?
    Har kört 80tals racer förut och är van med gammla växlar på ramen:D


    Cykeln jag annars skulle slå till på är Scott speedster s20
    Den är ju aluminium men med fina 105/ultegra komponenter.

    ca 3-4000 billigare.

    Värt att köpa cr1 ändå? :confused:[/lang]
     
  4. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    The Shimano Tiagra drivetrain on the CR1 Comp uses a 9-speed cassette on the rear wheel, and the Tiagra control levers are indexed for 9 speeds. One less cog on the cassette means either slightly less spread in your gear ratios, or a slightly larger gap in your lower end gearing. In regard for your immediate needs this might not be a concern.

    In the middle of composing this reply I believe I have completely changed my mind. Should you decide to upgrade your drivetrain in the future, the path would be toward a 10-speed cassette system, necessitating replacement of the control levers, cassette, and chain all together. Ordinarily I would steer you toward the Speedster S20, with its 10-speed 105 drivetrain (with the Ultegra rear derailleur) and really fine aluminum frame, but the current 105 will soon be obsolete. This summer, Shimano will release a lighter, less expensive, and better shifting version of 105 that will not be on the bikes until the 2011 model year.

    Since this year's 105 will soon be obsolete, my advice is to enjoy the CR1 frame this summer, buy the Comp with Tiagra, and don't worry about the drivetrain upgrade you might have had this summer because by the time you might be thinking about upgrading, everything will have changed.
     
  5. yanksfan77

    yanksfan77 New Member

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    I am just getting into cycling again, and bought the CR1 Comp as my first true raceable road bike. Scott is a solid manufacturer of Carbon Fiber and you should be able to ride this bike for a while(a year or more). After that your fitness and skills will be better and you might want to upgrade components at that point. I would ride the bike as is and see how it goes, keep the wheels as they are good training wheels. Just make sure you buy a bike that feels good for you. This could mean riding several different bikes before you choose one. Good Luck.
     
  6. rschleicher

    rschleicher New Member

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    I have the next level up CR1 (2010 CR1 Team), which here in the US was just under $2,000. (Whereas I think I would have paid $1700 for the Comp.)

    For that extra money you get full 105, including crank, brakes, levers, 10-speeds, etc., plus modestly-nicer wheels (Mavic Aksiums).

    That said, the frame is the same, and the Comp is a very nice deal. The frame has carbon drop-outs, carbon cable-stops, integrated bottom bracket, carbon fork with carbon steerer, etc. - much of which tends to only be found on pricier bikes.

    (All of the CR1's except for the top SL model have the same frame and fork. The top SL version, with Dura-Ace, uses a higher-grade carbon fiber, and saves around 100 gm or so in frame weight. But even the slightly heavier CR1 frame is quite light. And I think the same fork is used on all versions.)

    One poster mentioned that the new 105 is coming out, so if you DO upscope a bit, you might want to find out when Scott will switch over to the 5700 series 105. On the other hand, the weight savings of 5700 over 5600 is really pretty minimal. (Shimano's web site says that the new 105 group drops "30 grams" over the prior 105 - gee, that's one whole ounce!) But it now will have the cleaner derailleur cable routing that Dura-Ace and Ultegra already have (as well as other brands), and perhaps there are some performance improvements, so perhaps it is worth waiting for.

    You can get better components for less money with the aluminum Speedster line. But that CR1 frame is nice! Very comfortable, with good bump/vibration handling, while still feeling nice and stiff and snappy in terms of pedaling, cornering, descending, etc. (The 2010 CR1 frame is a lot different from the prior version, which was much more a pure-race frame.)
     
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