Large Man on a Bike

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Albert N. Mouse, May 12, 2003.

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  1. Hi all.

    I've made a couple posts in rec.bicycles.misc over the last few days regarding and upcoming bike
    purchase... I didn't even know this group was out there, or I might've posted here sooner.

    Bottom line: I'm a large guy (near 300lbs) looking to get on a bike for some road riding and light
    trails to get in shape. The LBS that I think I'm going to buy from stocks Specialized, Trek, and
    Raleigh. I'm looking to not spend a whole ton right away and upgrade again in a year or so once I
    slim down a little and (if) I enjoy it. I'd like to stay at or below $500.

    Considering the Specialized Hardrock, Trek 4500, and Raleigh M50/60. Anyone here have any feedback
    on these bikes that would be helpful? I'm most concerned about frame/wheel strength (due to my size)
    and the durability/performance of the front fork under load (again, due to my size).

    I'm leaning towards the HardRock... Seems to be a solid bike and I might be able to upgrade
    the stock fork, which I've been told is a little squishy, while still staying in the price
    ballpark I want.

    Anyone else have any info/tips/or similar experience?

    Thanks in advance.

    A. Nony Mouse
     
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  2. David

    David Guest

    "Albert N. Mouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm leaning towards the HardRock... Seems to be a solid bike and I might be able to upgrade
    > the stock fork, which I've been told is a little squishy, while still staying in the price
    > ballpark I want.

    *All* coil-spring forks would be squishy. They usually come sprung for riders in a medium weight
    range (typically around 160-180lbs), and heavier or lighter riders often need to swap springs as
    part of the dialing in process. Just make sure the fork has an available spring for your weight
    (or close). If you buy a bike with an air fork, make sure it has a recommended air pressure for
    your weight.

    You may have a problem with the fork being too flexy (or breaky) though. If it isn't strong enough
    or rigid enough, there should be forks that will work fine.
     
  3. Stay away from aluminum frames, STEEL is your friend!

    Just to throw a name out... the Gary Fisher Gitchee-Gummee is a great STEEL frame and a good "entry
    level" bike. The components aren't "the best", but as they break/wear-out, so will you knowledge
    increase, and perhapsw your weight decrease. You can upgrade these broken/worn components.

    Thsi is your shopping mantra: "STEEL IS REAL!"

    The ONLY upgrade I would insist upon (before the bike leaves the shop) is they insatall a Thomson
    seatpost and a Surly Constrictor seapost clamp.

    Ohh, and go buy this book: http://www.avocet.com/wheelbook/wheelbook.html

    Okay, Now pick up a set of wheels from some place like Nashbar... Look for Sun rims (RhynoLite's are
    nice) and Brass nipples, you;dd understand why after reading the book. Completely slacken the wheels
    and then re-tension, stress relieve and true them accoding to what you learned from the book.

    And visit this site: http://www.ridephat.com/ridephat/ It's for the "Large and in charge" folks
    such as us.

    Take it from someone who has broken just about everything you CAN break on a bike.... I now have
    Mfg. Reps. giving my LBS stuff to give to me to see how long it lasts under me. ;-)
     
  4. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "Albert N. Mouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi all.
    >
    > I've made a couple posts in rec.bicycles.misc over the last few days regarding and upcoming bike
    > purchase... I didn't even know this group was out there, or I might've posted here sooner.
    >
    > Bottom line: I'm a large guy (near 300lbs) looking to get on a bike for some road riding and light
    > trails to get in shape. The LBS that I think I'm going to buy from stocks Specialized, Trek, and
    > Raleigh. I'm looking to not spend a whole ton right away and upgrade again in a year or so once I
    > slim down a little and (if) I enjoy it. I'd like to stay at or below $500.
    >
    > Considering the Specialized Hardrock, Trek 4500, and Raleigh M50/60. Anyone here have any feedback
    > on these bikes that would be helpful? I'm most concerned about frame/wheel strength (due to my
    > size) and the durability/performance of the front fork under load (again, due to my size).
    >
    > I'm leaning towards the HardRock... Seems to be a solid bike and I might be able to upgrade
    > the stock fork, which I've been told is a little squishy, while still staying in the price
    > ballpark I want.
    >
    > Anyone else have any info/tips/or similar experience?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > A. Nony Mouse

    Spend a little more now, or pay for parts later. Raleigh M80 and have the LBS trade that flexy POS
    fork out for a Surly rigid fork.

    JD
     
  5. Technician

    Technician Guest

    > Thsi is your shopping mantra: "STEEL IS REAL!"
    >

    Now, where have i read that before ;-)

    > Ohh, and go buy this book: http://www.avocet.com/wheelbook/wheelbook.html
    >

    Hmm, i have added that to my amazon wishlist (i only use it for bookmarking anyway), should my
    previous attempt at wheel building fail (still holds my weight and stays fairly true, though i
    suppose i should have swapped the nipples for brass, the hub was not worth it anyway)

    > And visit this site: http://www.ridephat.com/ridephat/ It's for the "Large and in charge" folks
    > such as us.
    >

    Hmm, bookmarked for future browsing (not "phat, but not skinny anymore either ;-)
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
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