Late 1960s Schwinn Racer Question...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Jun 15, 2004.

  1. Hi,


    First off, thanks to everyone who responded to my previous 2 posts on
    my Puch Prima. You were all a great help.

    Latest question; I bought a Schwinn Racer from a garage sale and the
    owner told me it was about 35 years old. It appears to be a 3 speed
    with "indexed" shifting, but it's done without derailleurs. Instead,
    a cable connects the shift activator directly to the rear wheel to
    (presumably) activate an interior mechanism. I have the following
    questions:

    1) How do I disconnect this from the wheel? I need to replace the
    rear tire and I can't because the cable is in the way.

    2) How does this shifting mechanism work? It looks really
    interesting, especially since all the previous shifters I have seen
    were derailleurs.

    3) Are there any sites where I can find more information on this bike?


    Thanks in advance.
     
    Tags:


  2. Ted Bennett

    Ted Bennett Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    >
    > First off, thanks to everyone who responded to my previous 2 posts on
    > my Puch Prima. You were all a great help.
    >
    > Latest question; I bought a Schwinn Racer from a garage sale and the
    > owner told me it was about 35 years old. It appears to be a 3 speed
    > with "indexed" shifting, but it's done without derailleurs. Instead,
    > a cable connects the shift activator directly to the rear wheel to
    > (presumably) activate an interior mechanism. I have the following
    > questions:
    >
    > 1) How do I disconnect this from the wheel? I need to replace the
    > rear tire and I can't because the cable is in the way.
    >
    > 2) How does this shifting mechanism work? It looks really
    > interesting, especially since all the previous shifters I have seen
    > were derailleurs.
    >
    > 3) Are there any sites where I can find more information on this bike?
    >
    >
    > Thanks in advance.


    You are an owner of a 3-speed internally geared hub. It uses a
    planetary, or epicyclic, gear system to get the trio of ratios. These
    things are very common; many thousands of examples are in daily use
    worldwide.

    The shifting cable is attached to a small chain which enters the center
    of the axle. It can be unscrewed from its attachment inside the hub, or
    alternatively there may be a detachable connection between the actuating
    chain and the shift cable.

    Internally geared hubs have some advantages over derailer gears. You
    can shift at a standstill, the works are protected from the weather, and
    a chainguard can be fitted, which will dramatically increase chain life.
    However in any gear except direct drive, there are mechanical losses
    which are somewhat greater than a clean and lubricated derailler system.
    Geared hubs are currently available in 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, and 14 speeds.

    To learn more, visit http://www.rohloffusa.com/frame.htm
    or http://www.sheldonbrown.com/sturmey-archer.html

    Sheldon's pages have a tremendous amount of info, and will help you
    identify your hub and service it.

    --
    Ted Bennett
    Portland OR
     
  3. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 15 Jun 2004 20:31:56 -0700, [email protected] may have said:

    >Latest question; I bought a Schwinn Racer from a garage sale and the
    >owner told me it was about 35 years old. It appears to be a 3 speed
    >with "indexed" shifting, but it's done without derailleurs.


    Yup. Almost certainly a Sturmey-Archer internally geared hub. It
    probably has a little flip-top oil port on it, between the rows of
    ports. Give it a small squirt of motor oil in there once in a while.

    > Instead,
    >a cable connects the shift activator directly to the rear wheel to
    >(presumably) activate an interior mechanism. I have the following
    >questions:
    >
    >1) How do I disconnect this from the wheel? I need to replace the
    >rear tire and I can't because the cable is in the way.


    Where the cable connects to the short piece of chain coming out of the
    hub end, there's a knurled jamring and a knurled cable end; the cable
    unscrews from the chain there. Loosen the jamring by backing it off a
    half turn or so, and you can unscrew the cable end off of the chain
    assembly. The jamring keeps the adjustment from getting out of whack;
    when reassembling, adjust for proper shifting as detailed in the
    instructions on Sheldon Brown's website, and make sure that the
    jamring is tightened back up against the cable end to lock it in
    place.

    >2) How does this shifting mechanism work? It looks really
    >interesting, especially since all the previous shifters I have seen
    >were derailleurs.


    It uses a planetary gear system inside the hub; the cable's motion
    shifts bits inside to determine which part of the assembly is engaged
    with what. Automotive automatic transmissions use the same kind of
    gear assemblies.



    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
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