Latic Levels / Power & kingcycle

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by tuney, Feb 1, 2004.

  1. tuney

    tuney New Member

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    Im going to get my first kingcycle test in a couple of weeks... it's my first for a few years, and im wondering if its worth getting my lactic profile&Vo2 done at the same time. The reason being is that I have no idea what my LT is... as I havent raced/TT'd for years... and Im not about to do one at this time of year!

    Im not convinced that a kingcycle alone will be any use as there is no way to determine LT... and I dont think conconi tests are that accurate. Am i right here?

    To get an idea of my levels would it be better to get a Lactic/Power profile and use the standard 4.0mmol (I think this is the measure) as my threshold power? I can then relate this to my Kingcycle & Power Tap power.

    I ve been riding through percieved effort more than anything at the moment as I've only just got back on the bike after a couple of years off.

    Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated

    Chris
     
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  2. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    just to point out: your LT is **not** your TT effort, but an effort much lower (~15 to 20% less power). LT is defined as an exercise intensity (power in cycling, velocity/speed in running) that elicits a 1 mmol/L increase in lactate over exercise baseline levels (which will be ~ 2mmol/L), or at a fixed 2.5 mmol/L. Thus, LT is an effort that can usually be sustained for up to several+ hours.

    The Kingcycle uses an incremental test to exhaustion to determine maximum-minute power (which is what i term MAP). The Conconi test is 'designed' to ascertain a break point that occurs around the highest sustainable (~1-hr) effort. The Conconi work however, is all flawed and isn't reliable.

    However, sustainable power (for various durations) occurs at approximately the same % irrespective of absolute fitness levels (i.e. elite TdF pros will TT at approximately the same % of MAP as 3rd/4th cats). Thus, it was possible to draw up these guidelines for training with power, as defined by a short incremental test to exhaustion: http://cyclecoach.com/articles?article=Power_Guidelines&ext=.htm

    if you own an accurate power meter (e.g. SRM, Power Tap, possibly others?), then the incremental test can be self performed on most turbo trainers. however, best results are achieved with an 'audience', and is most safely done under the guidance of a sports scientist/exercise physiologist. i question the need of ascertaining actual lactate levels for training, and believe this is only necessary for doig studies within the sports sciences.

    Ric
     
  3. tuney

    tuney New Member

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    Thanks for the info Ric.

    I'm a bit behind with my training theory... I was under the impression that 4mmol was a useful value for determining LT (I was also think LT was the 1h exersion value...oops)

    It's interesting that sustainable power is at a similar %MAP for most rides.

    BTW Great Article.

    Cheers
    Chris
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    it's a common misconception, that is perpetuated by way too many coaches and others.

    4mmol/L is the OBLA (onset of blood lactate accumulation) and is just an arbitrary figure (although as fitness increases, so would power at OBLA).

    it is [interesting].

    glad you liked it chris

    ric
     
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