Law School Blues

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Pyth, Apr 22, 2003.

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  1. Pyth

    Pyth Guest

    I'm in my second year of law school, and my riding has been reduced non-existent. I find enough time
    to replace the air in my tires...I've even taken the racks off my car. My wife and I were avid
    mtbrs, spending a small fortune over a couple of years on nothing but bike stuff. We raced in the
    regional races and rode three times a week including the all-day Saturday ride. Now, I'm
    pasty-white, my eyes have perpetual dark rings, my middle has developed a smushy layer of frosting
    (how in the hell the wife manages to stay fit & trim, I'll never know), and my Rocky has collected
    dust. I long for the switchy single-track days of old and those thigh-burning climbs that climax
    with the incomparable feeling of conquest! Oh lord, what has become of me?
     
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  2. Doug Taylor

    Doug Taylor Guest

    "Pyth" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm in my second year of law school, and my riding has been reduced non-existent. I find enough
    >time to replace the air in my tires...I've even taken the racks off my car. My wife and I were avid
    >mtbrs, spending a small fortune over a couple of years on nothing but bike stuff. We raced in the
    >regional races and rode three times a week including the all-day Saturday ride. Now, I'm
    >pasty-white, my eyes have perpetual dark rings, my middle has developed a smushy layer of frosting
    >(how in the hell the wife manages to stay fit & trim, I'll never know), and my Rocky has collected
    >dust. I long for the switchy single-track days of old and those thigh-burning climbs that climax
    >with the incomparable feeling of conquest! Oh lord, what has become of me?

    You sold out ;-)

    But it could get worse. In 2 years you might be working 80 hours a week trying to make partner in
    some big law firm, and you won't have time to do anything. After that, kids and family...

    Ya gotta decide what's more important: making the big bucks or being in great shape. It's really a
    feat to be able to do both, though there are plenty of examples, I suppose.

    Not me, though. Suffice it to say that for an old fart lawyer, I'm in really good shape :)

    --dt
     
  3. Tim Reed

    Tim Reed Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003, Pyth wrote:

    > Now, I'm pasty-white, my eyes have perpetual dark rings

    There's this thing called coffee, ya know. :)

    I'm currently a 1L student, who uses his bike... to get to school (1 mile each way).

    -Tim
     
  4. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Doug Taylor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Pyth" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm in my second year of law school, and my riding has been reduced non-existent. I find enough
    > >time to replace the air in my tires...I've even taken the racks off my car. My wife and I were
    > >avid mtbrs, spending a small fortune over a couple of years on nothing but bike stuff. We raced
    > >in the regional races and rode three times a week including the all-day Saturday ride. Now, I'm
    > >pasty-white, my eyes have perpetual dark rings, my middle has developed a smushy layer of
    > >frosting (how in the hell the wife manages to stay fit & trim, I'll never know), and my Rocky has
    > >collected dust. I long for the switchy single-track days of old and those thigh-burning climbs
    > >that climax with the incomparable feeling of conquest! Oh lord, what has become of me?
    >
    > You sold out ;-)
    >
    > But it could get worse. In 2 years you might be working 80 hours a week trying to make partner in
    > some big law firm, and you won't have time to do anything. After that, kids and family...

    Or he could move to some mecca for mountainbiking, start up his own firm (maybe even taking
    environmental cases against ol' MV - that'd keep him in business indefinitely), be incredibly
    fortunate due to his excepting laywering skills and winning smile, make an obscene amount of money
    within two years by being very clever, popular, and nice, and decide that he only has to work two
    days a week to keep himself in the manner that he is accustom to, and he spends the rest of the week
    mountainbiking. Then again; maybe not.
    --
    Westie

    >
    > Ya gotta decide what's more important: making the big bucks or being in great shape. It's really a
    > feat to be able to do both, though there are plenty of examples, I suppose.
    >
    > Not me, though. Suffice it to say that for an old fart lawyer, I'm in really good shape :)
    >
    > --dt
     
  5. Tj

    Tj Guest

    The difference between a dead dog, and a dead lawyer in the road is:

    The dog has skid marks in front of it.

    TJ Are you SURE you want to be a lawyer?

    "Pyth" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm in my second year of law school, and my riding has been reduced non-existent. I find enough
    > time to replace the air in my tires...I've even taken the racks off my car. My wife and I were
    > avid mtbrs, spending a small fortune over a couple of years on nothing but bike stuff. We raced in
    > the regional races and rode three times a week including the all-day Saturday ride. Now, I'm
    > pasty-white, my eyes have perpetual dark rings, my middle has developed a smushy layer of frosting
    > (how in the hell the wife manages to stay fit & trim, I'll never know), and my Rocky has collected
    > dust. I long for the switchy single-track days of old and those thigh-burning climbs that climax
    > with the incomparable feeling of conquest! Oh lord, what has become of me?
     
  6. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 21:02:30 GMT, "Pyth" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm in my second year of law school, and my riding has been reduced non-existent.

    Oh fvck, what the world needs is another fvckin lawyer who can't ride!

    >(how in the hell the wife manages to stay fit & trim, I'll never know),

    Has TBF been hangin' round?

    Just a theory, one never knows.

    Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  7. TJ says:

    >The difference between a dead dog, and a dead lawyer in the road is:
    >
    >The dog has skid marks in front of it.

    What do you call 50 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean?

    v

    v

    v

    v

    v

    v

    v

    A bloody good start!

    Steve "nothing personal against lawyers, I just always liked that one....."
     
  8. Tj

    Tj Guest

    "Stephen Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > TJ says:
    >
    > >The difference between a dead dog, and a dead lawyer in the road is:
    > >
    > >The dog has skid marks in front of it.
    >
    > What do you call 50 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean?
    >
    > v
    >
    > v
    >
    > v
    >
    > v
    >
    > v
    >
    > v
    >
    > v
    >
    > A bloody good start!
    >
    > Steve "nothing personal against lawyers, I just always liked that
    one....."

    What do you call a lawyer with an I.Q. of 50? v v v v v v v v v v v Your Honor!

    I like that one too.

    TJ
     
  9. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Stephen Baker wrote:

    > Yeah - good one! There used to be a company called Nolo Press, who sold legal software (Write your
    > Own Will, etc.) years ago, who sent out a newsletter with a whole page of the latest lawyer jokes.
    > The software inhaled, but was worth buying just to get the newsletter. Wonder if they are still
    > around (too lazy to Google, don't need the s/w)

    Because you're immortal?

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  10. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    "Pyth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm in my second year of law school, and my riding has been reduced non-existent. I find enough
    > time to replace the air in my tires...I've even taken the racks off my car. My wife and I were
    > avid mtbrs, spending a small fortune over a couple of years on nothing but bike stuff. We raced in
    > the regional races and rode three times a week including the all-day Saturday ride. Now, I'm
    > pasty-white, my eyes have perpetual dark rings, my middle has developed a smushy layer of frosting
    > (how in the hell the wife manages to stay fit & trim, I'll never know), and my Rocky has collected
    > dust. I long for the switchy single-track days of old and those thigh-burning climbs that climax
    > with the incomparable feeling of conquest! Oh lord, what has become of me?

    I feel your pain, friend. When I went to L.S., I had to suspend raquetball, karate, muay thai,
    biking, running, you name it, it all went to last place. Felt like such a guilty luxury just to go
    for a half hour run...

    You know what they say: 1st year they scare you to death, 2nd year they work you to death, and 3rd
    year they bore you to death.

    I moved to Boise out of law school, got a cushy clerkship the first year, then into a firm with
    fellow mtb'ers and cyclists/runners/kayakers, who all covered for each other when nature called.
    Our office was on the river. When we weren't running during the lunch hour, we would grab inner
    tubes and run a few miles up river in the blasting heat, then drop the tubes in for a float back to
    the office.

    For the last several yrs, I've been on my own, with a very flexible schedule and an understanding
    staff. My boss is a lazy jerk, but hey. When the schedule's clear as the sky, and I start getting
    growly in the office, I usually get shoved out the door to go riding, rather than sit here and make
    more work for the secretaries.

    Life is good. But you've gotta pay your dues. Hang in there, force yourself to do something! But be
    careful about jumping for the brass ring of the big firms with their big salaries and their big
    cities, if you want any free time to carve out a life or identity for yourself.

    Remember, the most important things in life are not things, and that the road to hell is paved.

    2 cents, from one who's btdt.

    Paladin
     
  11. crazy6r54

    crazy6r54 Guest

    I have 2 jobs, a wife,4 MTB,clean house,have Sundays and Wensdays off. And I still find time to
    sleep and ride. You want cheese to go with that wine. Get off you lazy ass and find the time.

    Fire up MTB 03
     
  12. Pyth

    Pyth Guest

    "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The difference between a dead dog, and a dead lawyer in the road is:
    >
    > The dog has skid marks in front of it.
    >
    > TJ Are you SURE you want to be a lawyer?
    >
    >
    > "Pyth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm in my second year of law school, and my riding has been reduced non-existent. I find enough
    > > time to replace the air in my tires...I've even taken the racks off my car. My wife and I were
    > > avid mtbrs, spending a small fortune over a couple of years on nothing but bike stuff. We raced
    > > in the regional races and
    rode
    > > three times a week including the all-day Saturday ride. Now, I'm pasty-white, my eyes have
    > > perpetual dark rings, my middle has developed a smushy layer of frosting (how in the hell the
    > > wife manages
    to
    > > stay fit & trim, I'll never know), and my Rocky has collected dust. I long for the switchy
    > > single-track days of old and those thigh-burning climbs that climax with the incomparable
    > > feeling of conquest! Oh lord, what has become of me?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >

    Oh sure. Everyone hates lawyers until the day they need one.
     
  13. Pyth

    Pyth Guest

    > You know what they say: 1st year they scare you to death, 2nd year they work you to death, and 3rd
    > year they bore you to death.

    I feel it. I'm being worked to death so far this year. On top of it all, I tried out for and made
    the Moot Court team. Now THEY expect me to work! Dammit all!

    >
    > I moved to Boise out of law school, got a cushy clerkship the first year, then into a firm with
    > fellow mtb'ers and cyclists/runners/kayakers, who all covered for each other when nature called.
    > Our office was on the river. When we weren't running during the lunch hour, we would grab inner
    > tubes and run a few miles up river in the blasting heat, then drop the tubes in for a float back
    > to the office.

    What a life. That's ideal. If only...

    >
    > For the last several yrs, I've been on my own, with a very flexible schedule and an understanding
    > staff. My boss is a lazy jerk, but hey. When the schedule's clear as the sky, and I start getting
    > growly in the office, I usually get shoved out the door to go riding, rather than sit here and
    > make more work for the secretaries.
    >
    > Life is good. But you've gotta pay your dues. Hang in there, force yourself to do something! But
    > be careful about jumping for the brass ring of the big firms with their big salaries and their big
    > cities, if you want any free time to carve out a life or identity for yourself.
    >
    > Remember, the most important things in life are not things, and that the road to hell is paved.

    Unfortunately, I think the carriage-grade firms are my targets -- for now. I'd like the cash. My
    wife (or should I say Pfizer) has been providing the funding for my education. I'd like to be
    able to return the favor for awhile. Perhaps after the money piles up, I'll back-off and take it
    easy again.
     
  14. Doug Taylor

    Doug Taylor Guest

    [email protected] (Paladin) wrote:

    >Life is good. But you've gotta pay your dues. Hang in there, force yourself to do something! But be
    >careful about jumping for the brass ring of the big firms with their big salaries and their big
    >cities, if you want any free time to carve out a life or identity for yourself.

    I second. I started out in San Francisco and that lasted about 3 years before I freaked out. Now I'm
    in upstate NY and have been working for myself for about 25 years. Lawyer by profession; cyclist,
    ski/snowboard instructor, speed skater, nature lover by preference. Salary lower, but quality of
    life mo bettah.

    You decide.

    >Remember, the most important things in life are not things,

    Second again.

    >and that the road to hell is paved.

    But that paved ride is worth it ;-) --dt
     
  15. Pyth

    Pyth Guest

    "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Stephen Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > TJ says:
    > >
    > > >The difference between a dead dog, and a dead lawyer in the road is:
    > > >
    > > >The dog has skid marks in front of it.
    > >
    > > What do you call 50 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean?
    > >
    > > v
    > >
    > > v
    > >
    > > v
    > >
    > > v
    > >
    > > v
    > >
    > > v
    > >
    > > v
    > >
    > > A bloody good start!
    > >
    > > Steve "nothing personal against lawyers, I just always liked that
    > one....."
    >
    > What do you call a lawyer with an I.Q. of 50? v v v v v v v v v v v Your Honor!
    >
    > I like that one too.
    >
    > TJ
    >
    >

    Oooo. I don't know about the IQ thing. You haven't visited many top tier law schools lately. Perhaps
    the greedy, "shyster" image has some factual, albeit shaky, foundation, but lawyers usually aren't
    short in the IQ department.
     
  16. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Pyth wrote:
    > "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> The difference between a dead dog, and a dead lawyer in the road is:
    >>
    >> The dog has skid marks in front of it.
    >>
    >> TJ Are you SURE you want to be a lawyer?
    > Oh sure. Everyone hates lawyers until the day they need one.

    taking it personally? If you are blonde we can tell blonde jokes instead...

     
  17. Pyth

    Pyth Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Pyth wrote:
    > > "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]et...
    > >> The difference between a dead dog, and a dead lawyer in the road is:
    > >>
    > >> The dog has skid marks in front of it.
    > >>
    > >> TJ Are you SURE you want to be a lawyer?
    > > Oh sure. Everyone hates lawyers until the day they need one.
    >
    > taking it personally? If you are blonde we can tell blonde jokes
    instead...
    >
    > 1¢
    >
    >
    >

    One better, I'm blonde and thinning. So, you can tell blonde/bald/lawyer jokes.
     
  18. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On 23 Apr 2003 09:21:34 -0700, [email protected] (Paladin) wrote:

    [snip lawyer in training]

    [snip Paladin's utopian views on lawyers]

    >2 cents, from one who's btdt.
    >
    >Paladin

    Damn, I guess I should feel bad for my previous post.

    Peace, Bill

    The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should give
    an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  19. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    "Pyth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > > You know what they say: 1st year they scare you to death, 2nd year they work you to death, and
    > > 3rd year they bore you to death.
    >
    > I feel it. I'm being worked to death so far this year. On top of it all, I tried out for and made
    > the Moot Court team. Now THEY expect me to work! Dammit all!
    >
    >
    > >
    > > I moved to Boise out of law school, got a cushy clerkship the first year, then into a firm with
    > > fellow mtb'ers and cyclists/runners/kayakers, who all covered for each other when nature called.
    > > Our office was on the river. When we weren't running during the lunch hour, we would grab inner
    > > tubes and run a few miles up river in the blasting heat, then drop the tubes in for a float back
    > > to the office.
    >
    > What a life. That's ideal. If only...
    >
    >
    >
    > >
    > > For the last several yrs, I've been on my own, with a very flexible schedule and an
    > > understanding staff. My boss is a lazy jerk, but hey. When the schedule's clear as the sky, and
    > > I start getting growly in the office, I usually get shoved out the door to go riding, rather
    > > than sit here and make more work for the secretaries.
    > >
    > > Life is good. But you've gotta pay your dues. Hang in there, force yourself to do something! But
    > > be careful about jumping for the brass ring of the big firms with their big salaries and their
    > > big cities, if you want any free time to carve out a life or identity for yourself.
    > >
    > > Remember, the most important things in life are not things, and that the road to hell is paved.
    >
    >
    > Unfortunately, I think the carriage-grade firms are my targets -- for now. I'd like the cash. My
    > wife (or should I say Pfizer) has been providing the funding for my education. I'd like to be
    > able to return the favor for awhile. Perhaps after the money piles up, I'll back-off and take it
    > easy again.

    Ahh, moot court, I remember it well. I was National Moot Court team captain, and the travel and
    practice, etc., only adds to the "fun."

    Well, I have friends in the so-called big firms of Boise (at least they work like slaves and have
    tiny offices) and it is a huge deal for them to get out and ride before sunset, or do anything fun,
    before 730pm, and then they feel guilty because their only contact with their wives and kids is by
    cell phone and email.

    The divorce rate at the big firms is worth looking into.

    In my solo practice, I have one full-time person, + my wife part-time (somebody's gotta keep the
    boss smiling), and I honestly believe I have it made, except for the typically lower salary. But
    I've taken my fees in cars, furniture, baked goods, frozen salmon, tools, guns, even a good bike
    from a race promoter.

    But contact with real people with real problems is also very rewarding. I cut my teeth as a
    gladiator in court for a few years for big companies, and the ego rush was great, victories
    intoxicating, but you're just a hired gun. Hired, fired, doesn't matter.

    Now my clients bring me cinnamon rolls and invite me to their cabins in the mountains. And
    before you think that I "settled for this podunk lifestyle" know that I did *real well* in L.S.
    and had lots of options. I just wanted to live in Boise. And that's been a berry berry gooood
    decision for me.

    "It was so cold in Boise last winter that I saw a lawyer walking down the street with his hands in
    his *own* pockets." Just some things to think about. If you go the big lawyer warehouse route, just
    don't forget who you really are. Let them pay you, train you, then cut you loose!

    Paladin there I go again meddling and rambling...
     
  20. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Pyth <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Oooo. I don't know about the IQ thing. You haven't visited many top tier law schools lately.
    > Perhaps the greedy, "shyster" image has some factual, albeit shaky, foundation, but lawyers
    > usually aren't short in the IQ department.

    You make a weak and ultimately flawed argument. It wouldn't stand up for a minute in court in front
    of a good lawyer.

    Shaun aRe
     
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