Lawyers lips

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Callistus Valerius, Mar 11, 2005.

  1. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 16 Mar 2005 09:14:46 -0800, [email protected] may have said:

    >But I don't know where they'd put the Consent Form that we'll sign -
    >and have notarized - before each and every ride. Any ideas?


    No form, but an acceptance-of-terms notice on the saddle. "By
    applying your posterior to this saddle, you confirm that you have read
    and that you understand the instructions concerning safe operation and
    maintenance of this bicycle, and have accepted full and complete
    responsibility for following those instructions, and you further agree
    not to remove this label or permit any improperly instructed persons
    to use this bicycle." (May we never see such a label.) (Except on
    bikes sold to Microsoft's management, on which the label would need to
    be much longer, necessitating a stretch version of a banana seat.)

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     


  2. m-gineering

    m-gineering Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:
    >
    > On 16 Mar 2005 09:14:46 -0800, [email protected] may have said:
    >
    > >But I don't know where they'd put the Consent Form that we'll sign -
    > >and have notarized - before each and every ride. Any ideas?

    >
    > No form, but an acceptance-of-terms notice on the saddle. "By
    > applying your posterior to this saddle, you confirm that you have read
    > and that you understand the instructions concerning safe operation and
    > maintenance of this bicycle, and have accepted full and complete
    > responsibility for following those instructions, and you further agree
    > not to remove this label or permit any improperly instructed persons
    > to use this bicycle." (May we never see such a label.) (Except on
    > bikes sold to Microsoft's management, on which the label would need to
    > be much longer, necessitating a stretch version of a banana seat.)



    ISTR that Bill Gates has a Windcheetah
    ---
    Marten Gerritsen

    INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
    www.m-gineering.nl
     
  3. Jay Beattie wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> Victor Kan wrote:
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>> Actually, the PhD was in English, so I could see him not
    >>>> understanding simple mechanical things. OTOH, "Open" and "Closed"
    >>>> _should_ have posed no problem - or at least raised a question in
    >>>> his mind!
    >>>
    >>> "Open" and "closed" are a poor choice of terms.
    >>>
    >>> It makes sense if you think of open/closed to mean loose/secure
    >>> fastening, which may be obvious to someone whose goal is to loosen
    >>> or

    >>
    >>> secure their bicycle wheel.
    >>>
    >>> Open/closed can mean go/no-go, which may be obvious to someone whose
    >>> goal on their bike is "to go", which is the opposite of what you'd
    >>> want in this application.
    >>>
    >>> Maybe instead of lawyer lips, bikes should be the way they used to
    >>> be

    >>
    >>> and have QR skewers change their labels from open/closed to
    >>> loose/secure (though the latter can be deceptive if the QR isn't
    >>> adjusted properly). Or maybe have a skull and crossbones for the
    >>> open position, and a smiley face for the closed position.
    >>>

    >>
    >> What's needed is bigger QR levers. That way on one side, they could
    >> print "This should be facing outward if you are riding the bike!!"
    >> and on the other side "Don't ride with this side facing outward!!
    >> (See instruction manual.)"
    >>
    >> In English and Spanish, of course. Minimum 14 point type. And
    >> perhaps Braille.
    >>
    >> But I don't know where they'd put the Consent Form that we'll sign -
    >> and have notarized - before each and every ride. Any ideas?

    >
    > Frank, you are so old school. Warnings must use a discriptive
    > picture (not a mere skull and crossbones) -- like a picture of
    > someone going OTB with fracture marks through the arms and pain
    > lightning bolts coming out of the head. Everything is now very
    > dangerous, and that point needs to be brought home in
    > excrutiating detail. -- Jay Beattie.


    I don't know if you meant that to be funny, but I found it hilarious!
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  4. > serviceable via the use of nuts and a solid axle. But, with the
    > addition of the lips, if the intuitive-but-stupid wingnut attachment
    > method is employed, the wheel will at least have a decent chance of
    > remaining in place. It will probably loosen up (though not always;
    > the lever is long enough to get the nut quite tight) and it may tear
    > up the tabs of the fork, but at least the wheel is not likely to come
    > out.


    The lever itself isn't the restricting factor... it's the nut on the other
    side that is.

    Therefore, we should have two QR levers so that people can wingnut it or use
    it properly ;)

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 21:46:21 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >> serviceable via the use of nuts and a solid axle. But, with the
    >> addition of the lips, if the intuitive-but-stupid wingnut attachment
    >> method is employed, the wheel will at least have a decent chance of
    >> remaining in place. It will probably loosen up (though not always;
    >> the lever is long enough to get the nut quite tight) and it may tear
    >> up the tabs of the fork, but at least the wheel is not likely to come
    >> out.

    >
    >The lever itself isn't the restricting factor... it's the nut on the other
    >side that is.


    I thought it was the nut *holding* the lever that was the limiting
    factor.

    >Therefore, we should have two QR levers so that people can wingnut it or use
    >it properly ;)


    The leverless nuts are often threaded all the way through, while the
    QR-lever end isn't. You'd have to maintain a closer tolerance on
    skewer length selection if two QR levers were used.

    OTOH, think of the possibilities for confusing some people if you had
    the two levers labelled with different terminology.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  6. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 21:44:06 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jay Beattie wrote:
    >> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>> Victor Kan wrote:
    >>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>> Actually, the PhD was in English, so I could see him not
    >>>>> understanding simple mechanical things. OTOH, "Open" and "Closed"
    >>>>> _should_ have posed no problem - or at least raised a question in
    >>>>> his mind!
    >>>>
    >>>> "Open" and "closed" are a poor choice of terms.
    >>>>
    >>>> It makes sense if you think of open/closed to mean loose/secure
    >>>> fastening, which may be obvious to someone whose goal is to loosen
    >>>> or
    >>>
    >>>> secure their bicycle wheel.
    >>>>
    >>>> Open/closed can mean go/no-go, which may be obvious to someone whose
    >>>> goal on their bike is "to go", which is the opposite of what you'd
    >>>> want in this application.
    >>>>
    >>>> Maybe instead of lawyer lips, bikes should be the way they used to
    >>>> be
    >>>
    >>>> and have QR skewers change their labels from open/closed to
    >>>> loose/secure (though the latter can be deceptive if the QR isn't
    >>>> adjusted properly). Or maybe have a skull and crossbones for the
    >>>> open position, and a smiley face for the closed position.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> What's needed is bigger QR levers. That way on one side, they could
    >>> print "This should be facing outward if you are riding the bike!!"
    >>> and on the other side "Don't ride with this side facing outward!!
    >>> (See instruction manual.)"
    >>>
    >>> In English and Spanish, of course. Minimum 14 point type. And
    >>> perhaps Braille.
    >>>
    >>> But I don't know where they'd put the Consent Form that we'll sign -
    >>> and have notarized - before each and every ride. Any ideas?

    >>
    >> Frank, you are so old school. Warnings must use a discriptive
    >> picture (not a mere skull and crossbones) -- like a picture of
    >> someone going OTB with fracture marks through the arms and pain
    >> lightning bolts coming out of the head. Everything is now very
    >> dangerous, and that point needs to be brought home in
    >> excrutiating detail. -- Jay Beattie.

    >
    >I don't know if you meant that to be funny, but I found it hilarious!


    Have you seen the warning stamped into the side of the barrel or the user manual
    for any Ruger firearms?

    It's just about that bad. Jay's in touch with the modern.

    Ron
     
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