Le wedge and self fitting

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by nath1, Aug 29, 2007.

  1. nath1

    nath1 New Member

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    Hi all, I have been advised by a friend that I would benifit from the fitting of the product Le wegde to overcome an injury. I live in the uk and have managed to find a supplier here who also does consultate on the fitting. My problem is is that it is absolutly miles away. Near the opposite side of the country in fact. To my knolwedge this centre is the only one here. I really want to give this product a go as I am sure it is going to help and was wondering if any of you have fitted this product yourself WITHOUT a consultation? My friend was lucky as he had his fitted in the states whilst on vacation but that too is not an option,lol.

    nath
     
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  2. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    yeah, I did it. I use 2 under each cleat to raise the inside which is roughly a 2mm elevation on the one side. They taper from 1mm on the high side, down to about 0.2mm on the thin side of the wedge.

    is it for pronation/supination, or a leg length discrepancy?

    I'm not sure how effective they are, because, in my opinion, cycling is not as problematic for pronators as walking, running, or other sports activites all the foot.

    They are a bit expensive for what they are; I paid $40 for 8 pieces of plastic (the wedges) and a few screws. :) I should say they've been much more durable than I thought; mine have survived about 40,000km and several cleat changes.
     
  3. nath1

    nath1 New Member

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    Hi and thanks for your reply 531Aussie. I generaly favour the outside of my feet when I walk and my shoes always wear out on the out rear edge on the heal so I think that is pronation, am I right ? Did you feel a dramatic difference on installation? The kit here costs 29.99 which is better than the 200 pounds that the specialist charges for fitting them, ouch! Did you feel a difference on instalation? nath
     
  4. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    firstly, I'm no physiotherpaist, so.......:)..take all this "advice" for what it 'might' be "worth".

    I did initially notice a big difference, because I started with 4mm, mostly as an experiment. This felt a bit weird, so I immediately went to 3mm, then down to 2mm a few weeks later. I didn't have big problems to start with ( just some medial knee pain, most likely caused by very long cranks), but I, like you, walk with my feet slightly out, so I've left the 2mm rise for the last 2 years.

    If you walk with your feet slightly out, this means you're not a pronator, but either 'normal' or a supinator, depending how big the angle is. This wet footprint test will give you an idea. Obviously, the big pronator has the full footprint, the opposite for the supinator, and the normal dude is number 3.
    [​IMG]

    The potential problem with cycling is that the pedals are dead flat (some eventually bend a bit), and the shoe soles are pretty much dead flat, so your foot will be forced to turn in a bit; going against your natural 'step'. Like this:

    [​IMG]

    Generally, problems with forced pronation, when someone is not a natural pronator, manifest as issues on the inside of the leg (knee, ankle or shin).


    Does that make sense? :)
     
  5. nath1

    nath1 New Member

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    Thanks again:) . I think I will order the set ans have a go. the problem is really with one leg the left side. And the pain I get seems like itb but also some knee cap tracking problems. When I visisted the Le Wedge webbsite most of the symptoms especially the feeling of one leg doing something diffrent to the opposite side and constantly feeling that I have to adjust my bad side in the peddle was what I have probs with. I begun about a year ago to try and fix it going through most pedal sets thinking they were the cause. I settled for speedplays in the end. Initially then helped a little but after some serious mileage I realised the problem was still there. I even fitted an insole which give arch support because I know from past physio that the arch on foot on the poor side is slighty flatter. So In your instance which side of the cleat did you fit your wedge, on the inside (arch side) or the outer? nath
     
  6. Oruboris

    Oruboris New Member

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    Take a look at your most worn out street shoes: you can learn a lot about your body alignment based on the wear patterns on the soles.

    If you don't see major uneveness, I'd be very leary of this sort of DIY correction.

    But I'm even more skeptical of some of the 'expert' advice I've received over the years. Had a podiatrist insist that I needed thousand dollar insoles for a problem that turned out to be nerve damage due to a spinal tumor. Had a chiropractor insist I needed a lift in one shoe due to [allegedly] having one shorter leg. After a week of that, I was in such agony I threw the thing away and was instantly better. Never went back for my follow up.
     
  7. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    if it's an ITB issue, it could be something else causing it, and the wedges could make it worse. If you turn your feet outward with the wedges, this may add tension to the outside of your leg.

    I suggest Googling ITB problems for cyclists, and go from there.

    It might just be lack of flexibility, or your cranks are too long, or something else........you may just need a week or two of seroius quad and ITB stretches

    Most of all, take the 'interweb' advice for what it's "worth" :)
     
  8. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    ............or, your seat might just be too low

    From my understanding, pronation and falling arches isn't a big problem for cyclists, compared to weight bearing activities involving a complete (heel to toe) foot plant.

    Also, the overpronation on a bike seems to be at it's potential worst when riding off the saddle, as the picture above sort of exaggerates
     
  9. nath1

    nath1 New Member

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    Hi , Ok I have bought some Specialized Varius wedge shoes. Dont know if you know much about them but they have a sole that is already angled slightly to even out pedal mechanics. I have ridden them hard today in a road race and at first they felt a little strange but I had no pain at all. Strange!! So I am hoping that I have solved it as before each ride was causing a niggle. Fingers crossed:) . cheers for all your help. nath
     
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