Learning to Ride a Bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Steve McGinty, Jun 3, 2003.

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  1. My SO has just announced she'd like to try going out cycling with me. The problem is she's never
    learnt to ride a bike. As I was cycling almost before I was out of nappies I've no idea about
    teaching her how to ride a bike.

    Any tips on how to teach her, or experience from anyone who learned to ride as an adult?

    Regards! Stephen
     
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  2. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], Steve McGinty
    <[email protected]_DOT_.com> typed:
    > My SO has just announced she'd like to try going out cycling with me. The problem is she's never
    > learnt to ride a bike. As I was cycling almost before I was out of nappies I've no idea about
    > teaching her how to ride a bike.
    >
    > Any tips on how to teach her, or experience from anyone who learned to ride as an adult?
    >

    Saddle down so she can put both feet flat on the ground, pedals off and get used to scooting it.
    Gradually she will get used to coasting along with both feet off the ground for steadily increasing
    distances. Then add pedals and its just a case of putting the lifted up feet on the pedals and then
    turning the pedals.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Steve McGinty" <[email protected]_DOT_.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My SO has just announced she'd like to try going out cycling with me. The problem is she's never
    > learnt to ride a bike. As I was cycling almost before I was out of nappies I've no idea about
    > teaching her how to ride a bike.
    >
    > Any tips on how to teach her, or experience from anyone who learned to ride as an adult?

    Unhelpful answer - tandem.

    Well, it's the best solution if your SO wants to go out cycling with you. Doesn't help if she wants
    to ride on her own too though!

    cheers, clive
     
  4. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Tue, 03 Jun 2003 18:59:56 +0100, Steve McGinty wrote:

    > My SO has just announced she'd like to try going out cycling with me. The problem is she's never
    > learnt to ride a bike. As I was cycling almost before I was out of nappies I've no idea about
    > teaching her how to ride a bike.
    >
    > Any tips on how to teach her, or experience from anyone who learned to ride as an adult?

    If you are based in SE London (probably not) Greenwich Cyclists are running free cycle training
    session soon.
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 03 Jun 2003 18:59:56 +0100, Steve McGinty <[email protected]_DOT_.com> wrote:

    >Any tips on how to teach her, or experience from anyone who learned to ride as an adult?

    Wide, flat area - scoot first (with feet flat on floor and probably pedals removed) then add
    pedalling as the technique of Not Falling Over is mastered. It doesn't take long, my wife learned
    to ride in no time and now pilots the family triplet with the two children on the back for the
    school run.

    Note that differential fitess may may ensemble riding difficult to start with.

    Note also that while she's learning you need to make sure she starts with good habits, like spinning
    up hills instead of grinding up in high gears. Buy her a copy of Richard's Bicycle Book and John
    Franklin's Cyclecraft (brilliant book if somewhat dry).

    Make sure you move her saddle up as far as she will let you get away with it as soon as she will
    allow you to. None of that "knees around the ears" stuff thank you very much - save that for a More
    Appropriate Location ;-)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  6. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    <snip>
    > John Franklin's Cyclecraft (brilliant book if somewhat dry).
    <snip>

    Anyone have a copy I can have a flick through? Or do W.H.Smith do it ... ? I don't think I need it,
    but wouldn't mind a flick through a chapter or two. If it's worthy of my shelf, I'll jump on Amazon
    .. (ISBN: 0117020516)

    Nick
     
  7. In news:[email protected], Just zis Guy, you know?
    <[email protected]> typed:

    > Over is mastered. It doesn't take long, my wife learned to ride in no time and now pilots the
    > family triplet with the two children on the back for the school run.

    Is this something similar in design to the Goodies' trandem? ;)

    Alex
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Clive George wrote:

    > Unhelpful answer - tandem.
    >
    > Well, it's the best solution if your SO wants to go out cycling with you. Doesn't help if she
    > wants to ride on her own too though!

    Actually, a good friend taught his SO to cycle by getting a tandem so they could go touring
    together, and she stoked that round the Hebrides before she had her own solo (which she doesn't use
    much, rather preferring the back of the G-twin if they're out for a day).

    So not necessarily *that* unhelpful at all! There are definite advantages of this route: a beginner
    without years of cycling muscles can easily keep up (what with being linked by a steel tube!) with
    old hands (feet?) and start by doing fair size fun and interesting trips.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. . Woss "SO"?
    >
    >"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    ><snip>
    >> John Franklin's Cyclecraft (brilliant book if somewhat dry).
    ><snip>
    >
    >Anyone have a copy I can have a flick through? Or do W.H.Smith do it ... ? I don't think I need
    >it, but wouldn't mind a flick through a chapter or two. If it's worthy of my shelf, I'll jump on
    >Amazon .. (ISBN: 0117020516)
    >
    >Nick
     
  10. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > . Woss "SO"?

    "Significant Other" = politically correct speak for SWMBO, "'er indoors", etc.
     
  11. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > . Woss "SO"?

    "Significant Other", sweeping catch-all for variously boy/girlfriend, partner, husband, wife, SWMBO,
    Light of my Life, Designated Shag, etc. etc.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  12. Thus spake [email protected]

    > . Woss "SO"?
    > >
    > >"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > ><snip>
    > >> John Franklin's Cyclecraft (brilliant book if somewhat dry).
    > ><snip>
    > >
    > >Anyone have a copy I can have a flick through? Or do W.H.Smith do
    > it ... ? I
    > >don't think I need it, but wouldn't mind a flick through a chapter
    > or two.
    > >If it's worthy of my shelf, I'll jump on Amazon .. (ISBN: 0117020516)
    > >
    > >Nick
    > >

    Politically correct speak for significant other ~=partner ~= live-in lover/spouse etc.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  13. Al

    Al Guest

    > Saddle down so she can put both feet flat on the ground, pedals off and get used to scooting it.
    > Gradually she will get used to coasting along with both feet off the ground for steadily
    > increasing distances. Then add pedals and its just a case of putting the lifted up feet on the
    > pedals and then turning the pedals.
    >
    Is this a good technique to teach 5 year olds as well? My son doesn't seem to be getting the hang of
    riding and I think that it might be the stabilisers hindering rather than helping.

    Al
     
  14. Al wrote:
    >>Saddle down so she can put both feet flat on the ground, pedals off and get used to scooting it.
    >>Gradually she will get used to coasting along with both feet off the ground for steadily
    >>increasing distances. Then add pedals and its just a case of putting the lifted up feet on the
    >>pedals and then turning the pedals.
    >>
    >
    > Is this a good technique to teach 5 year olds as well? My son doesn't seem to be getting the hang
    > of riding and I think that it might be the stabilisers hindering rather than helping.

    Yes. In fact there is a bike out there on the market aimed at the young learner, called Like-a-Bike,
    which uses this principle. Much cheaper taking the pedals off though.

    Colin
     
  15. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    > > Over is mastered. It doesn't take long, my wife learned to ride in no time and now pilots the
    > > family triplet with the two children on the back for the school run.

    > Is this something similar in design to the Goodies' trandem? ;)

    Judge for yourself:

    http://www.chapmancentral.com/Web/public.nsf/Documents/me-n-u2

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  16. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Al
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Saddle down so she can put both feet flat on the ground, pedals off and get used to scooting it.
    > > Gradually she will get used to coasting along with both feet off the ground for steadily
    > > increasing distances. Then add pedals and its just a case of putting the lifted up feet on the
    > > pedals and then turning the pedals.
    > >
    > Is this a good technique to teach 5 year olds as well? My son doesn't seem to be getting the hang
    > of riding and I think that it might be the stabilisers hindering rather than helping.

    Even better if you can do it on grass - less hurt if they fall off. When he does want to start
    pedalling do that on level short grass too - the bike can't run away from under him.

    hth

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
  17. "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In news:[email protected], Steve McGinty
    > <[email protected]_DOT_.com> typed: .
    > >
    > > Any tips on how to teach her, or experience from anyone who learned to ride as an adult?
    > >
    >
    > Saddle down so she can put both feet flat on the ground, pedals off and
    get
    > used to scooting it. Gradually she will get used to coasting along with both feet off the ground
    > for steadily increasing distances. Then add
    pedals
    > and its just a case of putting the lifted up feet on the pedals and then turning the pedals.
    >

    And any tips for deserted suitable locations for such teaching (for someone who doesn't want anyone
    else to see her attempts at learning)?

    Rich
     
  18. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Richard Goodman
    <[email protected].rsk.homechoice.co.uk> wrote:
    > And any tips for deserted suitable locations for such teaching (for someone who doesn't want
    > anyone else to see her attempts at learning)?

    The grass in front of my shop on the Bicycle Island will have a few young people doing exactly the
    same thing.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
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