leg soreness cure?

Discussion in 'rec.sport.unicycling' started by ChangingLINKS.com, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. S_Wallis

    S_Wallis Guest

    vanman2004 wrote:
    > *You did King of Jester on a Uni? Hardcore!!
    >
    > How'd you do? *

    Lousy, because my legs locked up from the aforementioned quad injuries.
    Eric (onefiftyfour) cruised up it like a champ. It helps a little that
    he lives at the top of it.

    Scott


    --
    S_Wallis - MUni-motivated, Distance-curious

    "I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn
    how to do it." Pablo Picasso
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    S_Wallis's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/1520
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     


  2. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    drew, my legs still hurt today too. i've been hobbling around the
    house. it hurts more when walking downhill or down steps, or when i
    squat down to pet the dog.

    here's something i heard alot in the army...
    > pain is just weakness leaving the body




    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  3. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    drew, my legs still hurt today too. i've been hobbling around the
    house. it hurts more when walking downhill or down steps, or when i
    squat down to pet the dog.

    here's something i heard alot in the army...
    > pain is just weakness leaving the body




    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  4. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    drew, my legs still hurt today too. i've been hobbling around the
    house. it hurts more when walking downhill or down steps, or when i
    squat down to pet the dog.

    here's something i heard alot in the army...
    > pain is just weakness leaving the body




    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  5. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    drew, my legs still hurt today too. i've been hobbling around the
    house. it hurts more when walking downhill or down steps, or when i
    squat down to pet the dog.

    here's something i heard alot in the army...
    > pain is just weakness leaving the body




    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  6. vivalargo

    vivalargo Guest

    Second only to technique and experience, hard Muni, IME, is all about
    fitness. And man, does it go fast. Muni fitness is also different than
    street and touring fitness. For instance, over the last 6 weeks it's
    been too hot to do much Muniing, so I've been practicing riding skinnies
    and stair gapping and doing street stuff on my Muni. I returned back to
    Santa Barbara on Sunday and just didn't have the fitness to ride the
    same stuff I could ride before, despite riding 6 days a week for most of
    the month. I felt like a hacker. Eyal's been riding up there week in
    and week out and he just fowed down the stuff like it was nothing.

    So if you're sore, it's almost certainly a reflection of your fitness.
    The soreness will also go away, barring injury. Next time out, don't go
    so hard and slowly ramp up the intensity and most of all stay consistant
    till you can go every day and just get stronger. Meanwhile drink a ton
    of fluids (I like Cytomax) and stretch.

    JL


    --
    vivalargo - Santa Barbara Unicycle Club
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    vivalargo's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5625
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  7. vivalargo

    vivalargo Guest

    Second only to technique and experience, hard Muni, IME, is all about
    fitness. And man, does it go fast. Muni fitness is also different than
    street and touring fitness. For instance, over the last 6 weeks it's
    been too hot to do much Muniing, so I've been practicing riding skinnies
    and stair gapping and doing street stuff on my Muni. I returned back to
    Santa Barbara on Sunday and just didn't have the fitness to ride the
    same stuff I could ride before, despite riding 6 days a week for most of
    the month. I felt like a hacker. Eyal's been riding up there week in
    and week out and he just fowed down the stuff like it was nothing.

    So if you're sore, it's almost certainly a reflection of your fitness.
    The soreness will also go away, barring injury. Next time out, don't go
    so hard and slowly ramp up the intensity and most of all stay consistant
    till you can go every day and just get stronger. Meanwhile drink a ton
    of fluids (I like Cytomax) and stretch.

    JL


    --
    vivalargo - Santa Barbara Unicycle Club
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    vivalargo's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5625
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  8. vivalargo

    vivalargo Guest

    Second only to technique and experience, hard Muni, IME, is all about
    fitness. And man, does it go fast. Muni fitness is also different than
    street and touring fitness. For instance, over the last 6 weeks it's
    been too hot to do much Muniing, so I've been practicing riding skinnies
    and stair gapping and doing street stuff on my Muni. I returned back to
    Santa Barbara on Sunday and just didn't have the fitness to ride the
    same stuff I could ride before, despite riding 6 days a week for most of
    the month. I felt like a hacker. Eyal's been riding up there week in
    and week out and he just fowed down the stuff like it was nothing.

    So if you're sore, it's almost certainly a reflection of your fitness.
    The soreness will also go away, barring injury. Next time out, don't go
    so hard and slowly ramp up the intensity and most of all stay consistant
    till you can go every day and just get stronger. Meanwhile drink a ton
    of fluids (I like Cytomax) and stretch.

    JL


    --
    vivalargo - Santa Barbara Unicycle Club
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    vivalargo's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5625
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  9. vivalargo

    vivalargo Guest

    Second only to technique and experience, hard Muni, IME, is all about
    fitness. And man, does it go fast. Muni fitness is also different than
    street and touring fitness. For instance, over the last 6 weeks it's
    been too hot to do much Muniing, so I've been practicing riding skinnies
    and stair gapping and doing street stuff on my Muni. I returned back to
    Santa Barbara on Sunday and just didn't have the fitness to ride the
    same stuff I could ride before, despite riding 6 days a week for most of
    the month. I felt like a hacker. Eyal's been riding up there week in
    and week out and he just fowed down the stuff like it was nothing.

    So if you're sore, it's almost certainly a reflection of your fitness.
    The soreness will also go away, barring injury. Next time out, don't go
    so hard and slowly ramp up the intensity and most of all stay consistant
    till you can go every day and just get stronger. Meanwhile drink a ton
    of fluids (I like Cytomax) and stretch.

    JL


    --
    vivalargo - Santa Barbara Unicycle Club
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    vivalargo's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5625
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  10. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    by the way,

    the trails we rode on several days ago are adjacent to jester blvd.

    drew and i rode from my house, down jester blvd and the trail head is on
    the left just before the bottom of the hill. we did an exploratory loop
    and had to ride back up the road to my house. there are more trails in
    there than we had the energy to explore.

    funny how i've lived here so long and never explored them until now.
    looking forward to riding them again.


    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  11. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    by the way,

    the trails we rode on several days ago are adjacent to jester blvd.

    drew and i rode from my house, down jester blvd and the trail head is on
    the left just before the bottom of the hill. we did an exploratory loop
    and had to ride back up the road to my house. there are more trails in
    there than we had the energy to explore.

    funny how i've lived here so long and never explored them until now.
    looking forward to riding them again.


    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  12. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    by the way,

    the trails we rode on several days ago are adjacent to jester blvd.

    drew and i rode from my house, down jester blvd and the trail head is on
    the left just before the bottom of the hill. we did an exploratory loop
    and had to ride back up the road to my house. there are more trails in
    there than we had the energy to explore.

    funny how i've lived here so long and never explored them until now.
    looking forward to riding them again.


    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  13. onefiftyfour

    onefiftyfour Guest

    by the way,

    the trails we rode on several days ago are adjacent to jester blvd.

    drew and i rode from my house, down jester blvd and the trail head is on
    the left just before the bottom of the hill. we did an exploratory loop
    and had to ride back up the road to my house. there are more trails in
    there than we had the energy to explore.

    funny how i've lived here so long and never explored them until now.
    looking forward to riding them again.


    --
    onefiftyfour - Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    onefiftyfour's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/3495
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  14. S_Wallis wrote:*Drew, that is exactly the shape I was
    > in the week before I attempted to do the King of Jester hillclimb.
    > You didn't get it when I tried to explain that to you. *


    I still don't get it.
    See, people held you out to be a climbing God, but on the times I ridden
    with you, you've only climbed about as good as other riders.
    Clearly Eric is the best *local* climber. There is a possibility that it
    is AJ, but often times he simply won't (ride/compete/climb) so I can't
    tell for sure.
    I heard stories of you climbing the cement inclines that are around
    bridges for breakfast.
    So with all of that hype, you can understand why I'm still wanting to
    "see how it's done."
    WIth you in mind, I actually started practicing on a extremely steep
    grass incline.
    I think that climbing and gapping are the two most valuable skills for
    off-road (because everything else gets better automatically).


    --
    ChangingLINKS.com - member

    Wishing you Happiness, Joy and Laughter,
    Drew Brown
    'Changing LINKS' (http://www.ChangingLINKS.com)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ChangingLINKS.com's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5468
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  15. S_Wallis wrote:*Drew, that is exactly the shape I was
    > in the week before I attempted to do the King of Jester hillclimb.
    > You didn't get it when I tried to explain that to you. *


    I still don't get it.
    See, people held you out to be a climbing God, but on the times I ridden
    with you, you've only climbed about as good as other riders.
    Clearly Eric is the best *local* climber. There is a possibility that it
    is AJ, but often times he simply won't (ride/compete/climb) so I can't
    tell for sure.
    I heard stories of you climbing the cement inclines that are around
    bridges for breakfast.
    So with all of that hype, you can understand why I'm still wanting to
    "see how it's done."
    WIth you in mind, I actually started practicing on a extremely steep
    grass incline.
    I think that climbing and gapping are the two most valuable skills for
    off-road (because everything else gets better automatically).


    --
    ChangingLINKS.com - member

    Wishing you Happiness, Joy and Laughter,
    Drew Brown
    'Changing LINKS' (http://www.ChangingLINKS.com)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ChangingLINKS.com's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5468
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  16. S_Wallis wrote:*Drew, that is exactly the shape I was
    > in the week before I attempted to do the King of Jester hillclimb.
    > You didn't get it when I tried to explain that to you. *


    I still don't get it.
    See, people held you out to be a climbing God, but on the times I ridden
    with you, you've only climbed about as good as other riders.
    Clearly Eric is the best *local* climber. There is a possibility that it
    is AJ, but often times he simply won't (ride/compete/climb) so I can't
    tell for sure.
    I heard stories of you climbing the cement inclines that are around
    bridges for breakfast.
    So with all of that hype, you can understand why I'm still wanting to
    "see how it's done."
    WIth you in mind, I actually started practicing on a extremely steep
    grass incline.
    I think that climbing and gapping are the two most valuable skills for
    off-road (because everything else gets better automatically).


    --
    ChangingLINKS.com - member

    Wishing you Happiness, Joy and Laughter,
    Drew Brown
    'Changing LINKS' (http://www.ChangingLINKS.com)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ChangingLINKS.com's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5468
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  17. S_Wallis wrote:*Drew, that is exactly the shape I was
    > in the week before I attempted to do the King of Jester hillclimb.
    > You didn't get it when I tried to explain that to you. *


    I still don't get it.
    See, people held you out to be a climbing God, but on the times I ridden
    with you, you've only climbed about as good as other riders.
    Clearly Eric is the best *local* climber. There is a possibility that it
    is AJ, but often times he simply won't (ride/compete/climb) so I can't
    tell for sure.
    I heard stories of you climbing the cement inclines that are around
    bridges for breakfast.
    So with all of that hype, you can understand why I'm still wanting to
    "see how it's done."
    WIth you in mind, I actually started practicing on a extremely steep
    grass incline.
    I think that climbing and gapping are the two most valuable skills for
    off-road (because everything else gets better automatically).


    --
    ChangingLINKS.com - member

    Wishing you Happiness, Joy and Laughter,
    Drew Brown
    'Changing LINKS' (http://www.ChangingLINKS.com)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ChangingLINKS.com's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5468
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  18. Unitik908 wrote:
    > *may i asked what beating your leg with a hammer would do?
    > Chase *


    The hammer theory:
    When I was in highschool, I was on the rowing team.
    (6 man! Leader of the engine room! Rock!)
    If you haven't tried it, rowing is intense. Moreso that even M-uni. It's
    a lot like climbing Jester Hill "all out." Races are short (8-15
    minutes) and participants expend all of their energy in that time.

    Anyway, I had a theory:
    If massages and stretching helps heal stressed muscles,
    then, stressing muscles helps heal bruised muscles.

    For rowing, that theory worked very well. I would stretch a lot before
    the race, more than anyone else. Next, I would take a metal-working
    hammer and lightly bruise my thighs, parts of my back, arms (and hit the
    rest of my body).

    A good way to get the mindset is to count (10-12 strikes). I would also
    try to act very tired (relaxed) before the race. (It was said that these
    behaviours were somewhat intimidating to the competitors - kinda like
    the oil-drinking in "Over the Top").

    With bruised muscles, I would begin the race. 8 minutes would go by.
    During the race, we'd all give it our best and out of 6-8 boats, we'd
    usually win.

    Immediately after the race, some people would throw up (or at least look
    like it). Most would slump in the boat. Some would be visibly crying.
    I'm not just talking about our boat, but others. I would feel "down" for
    about a minute or two. Sometimes I would take steroids immediately after
    the race to calm my breathing. (I'd use an asthma inhaler because I have
    asthma).

    Quickly, I would feel "normal." Not just "normal," but "better." The
    bruising was gone, and there was no cramping or stressed feeling. I
    would have "more" energy than before the race. I'd be full of glee and
    able to celebrate the win, while others seemed too tired to put the boat
    away.

    When I didn't hammer, I did not get the same results.
    (In April, I competed in a dance competition, and could not shake off
    the deep nervousness and "heavy" feeling until I "got violent," punched
    myself a bit and jumped around.)

    Perhaps this is why deep muscle massage seems to go with boxing, martial
    arts, cycling and other sports.
    Perhaps, I just need the mental "kickstart."

    I don't know why it works for me, just that it works.
    Now that I've had this problem, I will probably use the same technique
    when I go out to this trail again.


    --
    ChangingLINKS.com - member

    Wishing you Happiness, Joy and Laughter,
    Drew Brown
    'Changing LINKS' (http://www.ChangingLINKS.com)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ChangingLINKS.com's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5468
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  19. Unitik908 wrote:
    > *may i asked what beating your leg with a hammer would do?
    > Chase *


    The hammer theory:
    When I was in highschool, I was on the rowing team.
    (6 man! Leader of the engine room! Rock!)
    If you haven't tried it, rowing is intense. Moreso that even M-uni. It's
    a lot like climbing Jester Hill "all out." Races are short (8-15
    minutes) and participants expend all of their energy in that time.

    Anyway, I had a theory:
    If massages and stretching helps heal stressed muscles,
    then, stressing muscles helps heal bruised muscles.

    For rowing, that theory worked very well. I would stretch a lot before
    the race, more than anyone else. Next, I would take a metal-working
    hammer and lightly bruise my thighs, parts of my back, arms (and hit the
    rest of my body).

    A good way to get the mindset is to count (10-12 strikes). I would also
    try to act very tired (relaxed) before the race. (It was said that these
    behaviours were somewhat intimidating to the competitors - kinda like
    the oil-drinking in "Over the Top").

    With bruised muscles, I would begin the race. 8 minutes would go by.
    During the race, we'd all give it our best and out of 6-8 boats, we'd
    usually win.

    Immediately after the race, some people would throw up (or at least look
    like it). Most would slump in the boat. Some would be visibly crying.
    I'm not just talking about our boat, but others. I would feel "down" for
    about a minute or two. Sometimes I would take steroids immediately after
    the race to calm my breathing. (I'd use an asthma inhaler because I have
    asthma).

    Quickly, I would feel "normal." Not just "normal," but "better." The
    bruising was gone, and there was no cramping or stressed feeling. I
    would have "more" energy than before the race. I'd be full of glee and
    able to celebrate the win, while others seemed too tired to put the boat
    away.

    When I didn't hammer, I did not get the same results.
    (In April, I competed in a dance competition, and could not shake off
    the deep nervousness and "heavy" feeling until I "got violent," punched
    myself a bit and jumped around.)

    Perhaps this is why deep muscle massage seems to go with boxing, martial
    arts, cycling and other sports.
    Perhaps, I just need the mental "kickstart."

    I don't know why it works for me, just that it works.
    Now that I've had this problem, I will probably use the same technique
    when I go out to this trail again.


    --
    ChangingLINKS.com - member

    Wishing you Happiness, Joy and Laughter,
    Drew Brown
    'Changing LINKS' (http://www.ChangingLINKS.com)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ChangingLINKS.com's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5468
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
  20. Unitik908 wrote:
    > *may i asked what beating your leg with a hammer would do?
    > Chase *


    The hammer theory:
    When I was in highschool, I was on the rowing team.
    (6 man! Leader of the engine room! Rock!)
    If you haven't tried it, rowing is intense. Moreso that even M-uni. It's
    a lot like climbing Jester Hill "all out." Races are short (8-15
    minutes) and participants expend all of their energy in that time.

    Anyway, I had a theory:
    If massages and stretching helps heal stressed muscles,
    then, stressing muscles helps heal bruised muscles.

    For rowing, that theory worked very well. I would stretch a lot before
    the race, more than anyone else. Next, I would take a metal-working
    hammer and lightly bruise my thighs, parts of my back, arms (and hit the
    rest of my body).

    A good way to get the mindset is to count (10-12 strikes). I would also
    try to act very tired (relaxed) before the race. (It was said that these
    behaviours were somewhat intimidating to the competitors - kinda like
    the oil-drinking in "Over the Top").

    With bruised muscles, I would begin the race. 8 minutes would go by.
    During the race, we'd all give it our best and out of 6-8 boats, we'd
    usually win.

    Immediately after the race, some people would throw up (or at least look
    like it). Most would slump in the boat. Some would be visibly crying.
    I'm not just talking about our boat, but others. I would feel "down" for
    about a minute or two. Sometimes I would take steroids immediately after
    the race to calm my breathing. (I'd use an asthma inhaler because I have
    asthma).

    Quickly, I would feel "normal." Not just "normal," but "better." The
    bruising was gone, and there was no cramping or stressed feeling. I
    would have "more" energy than before the race. I'd be full of glee and
    able to celebrate the win, while others seemed too tired to put the boat
    away.

    When I didn't hammer, I did not get the same results.
    (In April, I competed in a dance competition, and could not shake off
    the deep nervousness and "heavy" feeling until I "got violent," punched
    myself a bit and jumped around.)

    Perhaps this is why deep muscle massage seems to go with boxing, martial
    arts, cycling and other sports.
    Perhaps, I just need the mental "kickstart."

    I don't know why it works for me, just that it works.
    Now that I've had this problem, I will probably use the same technique
    when I go out to this trail again.


    --
    ChangingLINKS.com - member

    Wishing you Happiness, Joy and Laughter,
    Drew Brown
    'Changing LINKS' (http://www.ChangingLINKS.com)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ChangingLINKS.com's Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/5468
    View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/42150
     
Loading...
Loading...