LEJOG here I come...



R

Russell Fulker

Guest
I've just been offered a shedload of cash by my employer to cycle from
one end of the country to the other. Which is nice :)

They're going to pay for food & accommodation during the ride, which
leaves me free to raise funds for my son's school, Saxon Wood in
Basingstoke, which caters for children with physical disabilities.

Apologies in advance for any inane questions I may ask here in
preparation over the next few months. I've found many useful tips from
Ian Clare's site and, of course, Vernon's log. If there are any other
useful sites or freely available tips then I'd welcome the advice.

My aim is to go East of the Pennines in less than 12 days during May
next year. I aim to travel light and not restrict myself by booking
accommodation in advance. Beyond that, I'd be grateful for any advice
from the collective wisdom that is u.r.c.

Festive cheery things,

Russ
 
V

vernon levy

Guest
"Russell Fulker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I've just been offered a shedload of cash by my employer to cycle from one
> end of the country to the other. Which is nice :)


You jammy git!!!
>
> Apologies in advance for any inane questions I may ask here in preparation
> over the next few months. I've found many useful tips from Ian Clare's
> site and, of course, Vernon's log. If there are any other useful sites or
> freely available tips then I'd welcome the advice.


Seeing that your employer is picking up the tab for accomodation - seek out
the 'country houses' and hotels to enjoy the cuisine and luxury sleeping
provisions :)
But seriously, for modestly priced calories during the day I picked up on
using transport cafes and Asda restaurants for their all day breakfasts.
There isn't a lot of advice to pick up on once you have your route sorted.
I used the Phillips's OS based road atlas for route planning. It was cheap
enough to vandalise and have only the relevant pages ripped out and taken
with me. I can still be pretty cool in May so make sure that you have
enough layers to add/remove to stay comfortably warm. You have got plenty
of time to get some miles under your belt before the adventure so you'll be
fit and raring to go when the big day arrives.

If you are getting back via train, make the booking several days in advance,
preferably at a station and get written confirmation of your bike booking.
Much has been written about Scotrail's inflexible bike policy but providing
you have a booking and written/printed confirmation that you have booked a
bike on board than everything should be OK. I don't know where you live but
budget for a long day on your way home. It took 11 hours to get from Wick
to Leeds. A fellow passenger observed that she could get to Cambodia more
quickly.

Good luck!

Vernon
 
J

Jeremy Parker

Guest
"Russell Fulker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I've just been offered a shedload of cash by my employer to cycle

from
> one end of the country to the other. Which is nice :)


Get a big map of Britain to stick on the office wall, and mark your
proposed route in yellow felt marker. Send them a postcard each
night, show how far you have got. Let them colour it in on the map.

If you want the map and/or postcards after you get back, make that
crystal clear **before** you set off. It turned out that our
secretary was a postcard collector, and thought I was doing it for
her collection.

I do have the map though

Jeremy Parker
 
R

Russell Fulker

Guest
vernon levy wrote:
> "Russell Fulker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
> If you are getting back via train, make the booking several days in advance,
> preferably at a station and get written confirmation of your bike booking.
> Much has been written about Scotrail's inflexible bike policy but providing
> you have a booking and written/printed confirmation that you have booked a
> bike on board than everything should be OK. I don't know where you live but
> budget for a long day on your way home. It took 11 hours to get from Wick
> to Leeds. A fellow passenger observed that she could get to Cambodia more
> quickly.


Thanks for that. I was wondering how best to get home. I guess by that
stage I'll have a better idea of what distance I can expect to cover in
a day, so booking a few days ahead shouldn't cause too much grief. A
first class sleeper looks an attractive option!

> Good luck!
>
> Vernon


Thanks
 
R

Russell Fulker

Guest
wafflycat wrote:
>
> "vernon levy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>
>> "Russell Fulker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>
>>> I've just been offered a shedload of cash by my employer to cycle
>>> from one end of the country to the other. Which is nice :)

>>
>> You jammy git!!!

>
> I echo that sentiment with a distinct shade of green included...



It's a new scheme they've launched to help us with our 'work-life
balance' or somesuch. Mind you, if they knew how much my balance was
already skewed towards 'life', and not 'work', they'd probably have
binned my application on receipt.

Maybe they figure productivity goes up when I'm out of the office!
 
V

vernon levy

Guest
> Thanks for that. I was wondering how best to get home. I guess by that
> stage I'll have a better idea of what distance I can expect to cover in a
> day, so booking a few days ahead shouldn't cause too much grief. A first
> class sleeper looks an attractive option!


When it comes to booking a ticket...try to avoid doing it by phone with
Virgin...you'll get a voice activated aggravation ordering automaton before
the system gives up and transfers you to a clueless operative in India. The
whole farce took me 25 minutes to sort out. Try to use a real person in a
station.

As for a sleeper...hah! The train left Thurso at 06:50 or thereabouts.
First class sleeper....nahh..... You'll have to change at Inverness and
Edinburgh at least. It also might be worth your while to research the
independent hostels in Scotland. They weren't of interest to me as I used
campsites and fields all the way. Don't be put off using certain roads by
the Scots telling you that they are busy and horrendous....their notion of
busy is several magnitudes below what I'd consider to be busy in West
Yorkshire. Do take the time to soak in the majesty of the Scottish
landscape. I'll be returning to Scotland for some more cycle touring.
 
S

Sandy Morton

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
vernon levy <[email protected]> wrote:
> Do take the time to soak in the majesty of the Scottish landscape.
> I'll be returning to Scotland for some more cycle touring.



IMMIC - take the train to Achnasheen and then cycle to Applecross.

--
T h e - e x t e n d e r ! ! ! !
 
T

the.Mark

Guest
Sandy Morton wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> vernon levy <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Do take the time to soak in the majesty of the Scottish
>> landscape. I'll be returning to Scotland for some more cycle
>> touring.

>
>
> IMMIC - take the train to Achnasheen and then cycle to
> Applecross.


Oh yes, I'd recommend that.
--
Cheers
the.Mark
 
A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
vernon levy wrote:
>> Thanks for that. I was wondering how best to get home. I guess by
>> that stage I'll have a better idea of what distance I can expect to
>> cover in a day, so booking a few days ahead shouldn't cause too much
>> grief. A first class sleeper looks an attractive option!

>
> When it comes to booking a ticket...try to avoid doing it by phone
> with Virgin...you'll get a voice activated aggravation ordering
> automaton before the system gives up and transfers you to a clueless
> operative in India. The whole farce took me 25 minutes to sort out. Try
> to use a real person in a station.


I've no idea which railway company has the best sales hotline. I imagine any
staffed station in northern Scotland would have a reasonably astute person
working in it, so that'd probably be good.

> As for a sleeper...hah! The train left Thurso at 06:50 or
> thereabouts. First class sleeper....nahh..... You'll have to change
> at Inverness and Edinburgh at least.


There's a perfectly good sleeper from Inverness to London with no change at
Edinburgh and a fair amount of bike space. Online bookings start from £50
each way. First class is more pricey, but also worth it. Obviously, a
sleeper service to Thurso would be just silly.
--
Ambrose
 
Russell Fulker wrote:
> I've just been offered a shedload of cash by my employer to cycle from
> one end of the country to the other. Which is nice :)
>
> They're going to pay for food & accommodation during the ride, which
> leaves me free to raise funds for my son's school, Saxon Wood in
> Basingstoke, which caters for children with physical disabilities.
>
> Apologies in advance for any inane questions I may ask here in
> preparation over the next few months. I've found many useful tips from
> Ian Clare's site and, of course, Vernon's log. If there are any other
> useful sites or freely available tips then I'd welcome the advice.
>
> My aim is to go East of the Pennines in less than 12 days during May
> next year. I aim to travel light and not restrict myself by booking
> accommodation in advance. Beyond that, I'd be grateful for any advice
> from the collective wisdom that is u.r.c.
>
> Festive cheery things,
>
> Russ


I'd recommend west of pennines, A49 from Cheshire to A6 near Preston.
A49 fast and over quite quickly and old A6 very quiet and pleasant.
Worst of it was a huge multi lane island in Wigan AFAIrecall and weird
scary public bog (Wigan again on way out on edge of park) full of odd
blokes.
Best breakfast in whole journey was at Houston's in Wick.

have a good trip

Jacob
 
R

Russell Fulker

Guest
Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>
> There's a perfectly good sleeper from Inverness to London with no change
> at Edinburgh and a fair amount of bike space. Online bookings start from
> £50 each way. First class is more pricey, but also worth it. Obviously,
> a sleeper service to Thurso would be just silly.


I'll be aiming for Reading. Not that I actually live there, but it's
the most covenient big place at which I can consider myself 'nearly
home'. It's been a while since I checked, but IIRC the Inverness
sleeper seemed a reasonable way of both getting home & breaking the
monotony of the journey. I'll do a bit more research nearer the time
though.
 
R

Russell Fulker

Guest
the.Mark wrote:

> Sandy Morton wrote:
>
>>In article <[email protected]>,
>> vernon levy <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>>Do take the time to soak in the majesty of the Scottish
>>>landscape. I'll be returning to Scotland for some more cycle
>>>touring.

>>
>>
>>IMMIC - take the train to Achnasheen and then cycle to
>>Applecross.

>
>
> Oh yes, I'd recommend that.


As much as I'd love to, unfortunately I don't think I'll have too much
time for sightseeing :-(

Maybe next time...
 
R

RG

Guest
"Russell Fulker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>>
>> There's a perfectly good sleeper from Inverness to London with no change
>> at Edinburgh and a fair amount of bike space. Online bookings start from
>> £50 each way. First class is more pricey, but also worth it. Obviously, a
>> sleeper service to Thurso would be just silly.

>
> I'll be aiming for Reading. Not that I actually live there, but it's the
> most covenient big place at which I can consider myself 'nearly home'.
> It's been a while since I checked, but IIRC the Inverness sleeper seemed a
> reasonable way of both getting home & breaking the monotony of the
> journey. I'll do a bit more research nearer the time though.


We did JOGLE in June this year and used the London-Inverness sleeper -
excellent, on time etc BUT be warned that the Thurso/Wick to Inverness
train service is a nightmare for bikes (although I think there may be a bus
from Wick to Inverness that takes bikes) .... our "story" is at
www.beewee.co.uk and the obvious link if you want to see the route etc ...
albeit that we did the E2E "downhill" version.

RG
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>,
Russell Fulker ('[email protected]') wrote:

> Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>>
>> There's a perfectly good sleeper from Inverness to London with no
>> change at Edinburgh and a fair amount of bike space. Online bookings
>> start from £50 each way. First class is more pricey, but also worth
>> it. Obviously, a sleeper service to Thurso would be just silly.

>
> I'll be aiming for Reading. Not that I actually live there, but it's
> the most covenient big place at which I can consider myself 'nearly
> home'. It's been a while since I checked, but IIRC the Inverness
> sleeper seemed a reasonable way of both getting home & breaking the
> monotony of the journey. I'll do a bit more research nearer the time
> though.


In contrast to daytime train journeys I find the sleeper service
comfortable, friendly, efficient, and well worth the money. It doesn't
go as fast as a daytime train, of course, but you don't mind that
because you're asleep, and when you wake up you just get off the train
at your destination. In practice even when travelling second class you
rarely have to share, but first class is definitely nicer (the
difference being, chiefly, that you /know/ you're not going to have to
share).

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; lovely alternative to rice.
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
> There's a perfectly good sleeper from Inverness to London with no change at
> Edinburgh and a fair amount of bike space. Online bookings start from £50
> each way. First class is more pricey, but also worth it. Obviously, a
> sleeper service to Thurso would be just silly.


If you can wait till the appropriate time and guess when you will be
coming back then you can pick up a bargain berth for 19/29 scottish
pounds. It includes breakfast as well. The sleeper is one of the parts
of the railway I do like..

...d
 
T

tony R

Guest
"vernon levy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Do take the time to soak in the majesty of the Scottish
> landscape. I'll be returning to Scotland for some more cycle touring.
>

That's a sound piece of advice. I did it in 15 days generally on the West. I
wish I'd taken a week longer in Scotland, and intend to head back that way
one day.

tony R.
 
D

Duncan Gray

Guest
"vernon levy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> It also might be worth your while to research the
> independent hostels in Scotland. They weren't of interest to me as I used
> campsites and fields all the way.


and

> Do take the time to soak in the majesty of the Scottish
> landscape. I'll be returning to Scotland for some more cycle touring.


Most Scottish hostels are listed in
http://www.highland-hostels.co.uk/
http://www.hostel-scotland.co.uk/


Personally, I don't fancy all that cycling through England.
I'm planning a JoGMoG instead.


--
Duncan Gray

The Mountaineering Council of Scotland
www.mountaineering-scotland.org.uk
 
M

Mike K Smith

Guest
Duncan Gray wrote:

> Personally, I don't fancy all that cycling through England.
> I'm planning a JoGMoG instead.


Sorry, where is MoG?

My wife has suggested we do a Co Durham JoG Co Durham ride sometime.
 
T

the.Mark

Guest
Mike K Smith wrote:
> Duncan Gray wrote:
>
>> Personally, I don't fancy all that cycling through England.
>> I'm planning a JoGMoG instead.

>
> Sorry, where is MoG?


Mull of Galloway

--
Cheers
the.Mark