lemon cookies

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Julia Altshuler, Jan 27, 2004.

  1. A short while ago I posted asking for how to get an intense lemon flavor in lemon cookies. I'm
    slowly working my way through everyone's ideas. That's slowly because this is a pet home project,
    not something for a bakery. I only get a yen for cookies every few weeks so I experiment then.

    Here's what I've got so far.

    Ingredients:

    1.5 sticks of butter 1 cup sugar 1 egg .5 tsp. vanilla 1 lime, zest and juice 1 cup unbleached white
    flour .5 cup King Arthur brand white whole wheat flour .5 cup oat flour .5 tsp. baking powder

    Explanation of the ingredients:

    I use salted butter and leave out the table salt.

    The original recipe calls for 2 cups of white flour, but I like to vary that. Some white wheat flour
    seems to be necessary since the cookie gets too crumbly without it. I make oat flour by taking
    Quaker rolled oats and processing them in the food processor with the steel blade. It doesn't get
    fine enough for all of it to go through a sifter which I like. It gives the cookie a little texture.
    Someone on this list recommended King Arthur white whole wheat flour. I love the stuff and have been
    using it in all my baking.

    For last night's experiment, I used a lime instead of lemon only because limes were on sale at
    the supermarket. There's no strong difference in flavor. I thought the green flecks were
    festive looking.

    Method:

    Cream butter and sugar. Add egg, vanilla, grated lime zest and 2 Tablespoons of the lime juice. Mix
    well. Sift in dry ingredients. Add unsifted oat flour. Mix. Form into a log wrapped in wax paper and
    plastic wrap. Refrigerate over night. Cut cookies a quarter inch thick with a serrated knife. Place
    on parchment paper on cookie sheet. With a pastry brush, brush remaining lime juice on tops of
    cookies. Bake at 350 degrees until lightly browned on bottom, about 10 minutes. Let cool on cookie
    sheet for a few minutes before trying to remove as they crumble easily.

    Results:

    I'm pleased. I especially like the texture from the oat flour. The cookie stays moist and tastes
    buttery. The lime juice with no extra sugar on top is getting closer to the intense flavor I want.
    I'm still going for more. Y'all had suggestions for lemon oil and frozen concentrate. I'll try them
    and report back.

    --Lia
     
    Tags:


  2. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s52...
    : A short while ago I posted asking for how to get an intense
    lemon flavor
    : in lemon cookies. I'm slowly working my way through everyone's
    ideas.

    <snip>

    The lime juice with no extra
    : sugar on top is getting closer to the intense flavor I want.
    I'm still
    : going for more. Y'all had suggestions for lemon oil and frozen concentrate. I'll try them and
    : report back.
    :
    :
    : --Lia
    : ========

    Sounds good Lia. Looking forward to trying them once you've perfected your recipe!

    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  3. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    >
    > A short while ago I posted asking for how to get an intense lemon flavor in lemon cookies. I'm
    > slowly working my way through everyone's ideas. That's slowly because this is a pet home project,
    > not something for a bakery. I only get a yen for cookies every few weeks so I experiment then.

    Lemon cookies! I suggest you send them to me for expert analysis.

    Brian Rodenborn
     
  4. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s52... <snip>
    > I'm pleased. I especially like the texture from the oat flour. The cookie stays moist and tastes
    > buttery. The lime juice with no extra sugar on top is getting closer to the intense flavor I want.
    > I'm still going for more. Y'all had suggestions for lemon oil and frozen concentrate. I'll try
    > them and report back.
    >
    >
    > --Lia
    >

    Lemon oil, lime oil, or orange oil will all serve to intensify the flavor. Just be sure not to
    overdo it...too much will cause a bitter aftertaste, especially in baked items.

    kimberly
     
  5. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s52...
    > A short while ago I posted asking for how to get an intense lemon flavor in lemon cookies.
    <snip>
    >
    > --Lia
    >

    Lia, Here's a recipe I got from one of my favorite Pastry Chefs...Cindy Mushet. These are very
    lemony, and the chocolate is the perfect accompaniment.

    Baci di Dama

    Pans & Prep: 2 sheet pans, lined with parchment paper Double boiler, or similar set up (two pans or
    bowl and pan) Food processor & stand mixer

    Ingredients:
    7/8 cup (4 1/2 oz) blanched almonds
    8/2 cup + 2 Tbsp (4 1/2 oz) sugar 1 cup + 1 Tbsp (4 1/2 oz) butter 1 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
    9/2 tsp lemon oil zest of 2 large or 3 medium lemons pinch salt 1 cup minus 1 Tbsp (4 1/2 oz)
    unbleached flour 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate

    Place almonds and sugar in the processor and pulse until the almonds are ground to the texture of
    fine sand.

    In the bowl of a stand mixer, fitted with the paddle attachment, place the almond/sugar mixture,
    butter, vanilla, lemon oil, lemon zest, and salt. Beat on med-high until very light in color- nearly
    white- about 4-5 minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer and sift the flour over the top. Gently
    fold, being careful not to overwork the dough, until the mixture is homogenous. Chill 30 min or up
    to overnight

    Preheat oven to 350*f. Use a small ice cream scoop or melon baller to shape the dough into small
    rounds. Place each mound 1 1/2" apart on the cookie sheets, and use the heel of your hand to
    slightly flatten to about 3/8 inch thick. If possible, chill again briefly before baking. Bake until
    very delicate golden brown, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven and place on racks to cool
    completely.

    Finely chop chocolate and place in top half of double boiler. In double boiler bottom, bring an inch
    or so of water to a boil. Turn off the heat and place top half containing chocolate over the water.
    Stir frequently, until smooth and evenly melted. When the cookies are cool, spread the bottoms and
    sandwich them together. Chill briefly to set chocolate.

    Mangia!

    kimberly
     
  6. Nexis wrote:

    > Lia, Here's a recipe I got from one of my favorite Pastry Chefs...Cindy Mushet. These are very
    > lemony, and the chocolate is the perfect accompaniment.
    >
    > Baci di Dama
    >

    I've got it printed out. Thanks! That's a little more in the way of ingredients and equipment than I
    usually go for, but I may try these anyway on a special occasion.

    --Lia
     
  7. Nexis wrote:

    > Lemon oil, lime oil, or orange oil will all serve to intensify the flavor. Just be sure not to
    > overdo it...too much will cause a bitter aftertaste, especially in baked items.
    >
    > kimberly

    I'm familiar with that aftertaste which is why I've avoided lemon oil so far. Still, so many people
    have suggested it that I have to get some and begin experimenting.

    --Lia
     
  8. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s52...
    > Nexis wrote:
    >
    > > Lia, Here's a recipe I got from one of my favorite Pastry Chefs...Cindy
    Mushet.
    > > These are very lemony, and the chocolate is the perfect accompaniment.
    > >
    > > Baci di Dama
    > >
    >
    >
    > I've got it printed out. Thanks! That's a little more in the way of ingredients and equipment than
    > I usually go for, but I may try these anyway on a special occasion.
    >
    >
    > --Lia

    Do try them...they're worth the effort, and it's really not as complicated as it sounds :) You
    can use the microwave to melt the chocolate, but I find I get more consistent results with a
    double boiler.

    kimberly
     
  9. Gtwy4cb

    Gtwy4cb Guest

    >I used a lime instead of lemon

    Use a microplane zester--the zest comes out like snow--no bitter white pith.
     
  10. Gtwy4cb wrote:
    >>I used a lime instead of lemon
    >
    >
    > Use a microplane zester--the zest comes out like snow--no bitter white pith.

    I did! Another good idea I got from this list. --Lia
     
  11. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On 28 Jan 2004 23:34:46 GMT, [email protected] (Eveningg) wrote:

    >Has anyone ever used citric acid to add tartness? I'm just curious.
    >
    >Eve

    I was thinking of citric acid (aka "sour salt").too. Another idea would be to use undiluted frozen
    lemonade, perhaps in the glaze.

    Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
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