lemon pepper spice

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by anonymous, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture of
    some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a vegetable
    called a lemon pepper?
     
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  2. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture
    > of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a
    > vegetable called a lemon pepper?

    lol....
     
  3. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture
    > of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a
    > vegetable called a lemon pepper?

    Not a vegetable but actually a fruit, the lemon pepper grows
    in Zanzibar and there is an annual Lemon Pepper Festival at
    harvest time, in August. Locally it is counted an
    aphrodisiac of considerable power, but many anthropologists
    aver that this is a tale made up by the local lads so that
    they can pretend to be in its uncontrollable grip and have
    their wicked way despite the (probably phony) squeals of
    protest coming from the lassies. Anyhow, if you make the
    trip at that time you're sure to have fun.
     
  4. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture
    > of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a
    > vegetable called a lemon pepper?

    Where have you been hiding?

    Lemon Pepper comes from the lemon pepper tree. Although it
    was originally cultivated in Asia Minor, Marco Polo brought
    back some cuttings from the tree to Italy along with the now
    famous spaghetti plants.

    About 100 years later there were fields of semolina
    spaghetti growing throughout the region simultaneously the
    lemon pepper trees had flourished in the moist climate of
    the boot and the harvests were growing as was the popularity
    of the lemon pepper spice.

    The little lemon pepper berries are usually allowed to
    ripen and dry right on the tree in the late summer. The
    tree beaters come along with very long sticks and pieces
    of cloth which they lay under the branches. They then hit
    the branches with the sticks so the berries fall off onto
    the cloth.

    In the very early years the berries were ground into a fine
    powder and inhaled into the nose much the same as snuff.
    They even had very ornate lemon pepper boxes for the powder.
    Unfortunately the buzz was so great that the powder became
    addictive.

    Legend has it that one day an Italian had too much wine and
    accidentally spilled some of the powder onto a piece of
    veal, and that was the birth of the use of the powder as a
    food flavoring agent.

    Dimitri
     
  5. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture
    > of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a
    > vegetable called a lemon pepper?

    Lemon pepper spice is the one thing I probably use the most
    of. ;-) It's fabulous on just about any meat, but I'm
    careful to buy the salt free version, otherwise it's nearly
    1/2 salt and ruins my recipes!

    My label says:

    Black pepper and other spices, Rice flour, Lemon powder,
    Garlic, Citric Acid, and Calcium stearate (a flow agent).

    K.

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  6. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture
    > of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a
    > vegetable called a lemon pepper?

    Lemon Pepper is a spice blend of lemon peel, sometimes salt,
    and pepper. Lemon Peppers, also known as Lemon Drop Peppers
    are a pepper variety grown in Brazil. They actually have a
    lemon flavor to them, and they're quite hot. There's also a
    Lemon King hybrid pepper.

    kimberly
     
  7. Kswck

    Kswck Guest

    "Anthony" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a
    > > mixture of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there
    > > a vegetable called a lemon pepper?
    >
    > Not a vegetable but actually a fruit, the lemon pepper
    > grows in Zanzibar
    and
    > there is an annual Lemon Pepper Festival at harvest
    > time, in August. Locally it is counted an aphrodisiac of
    > considerable power, but many anthropologists aver that
    > this is a tale made up by the local lads so that they
    > can pretend to be in its uncontrollable grip and have
    > their wicked
    way
    > despite the (probably phony) squeals of protest coming
    > from the lassies. Anyhow, if you make the trip at that
    > time you're sure to have fun.
    >
    And it's great with that small Italian town that grows its
    spaghetti on trees-or didn't you ever see that commercial?
     
  8. Dimitri wrote:

    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture
    >> of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a
    >> vegetable called a lemon pepper?
    >
    >
    > Where have you been hiding?
    >
    > Lemon Pepper comes from the lemon pepper tree. Although it
    > was originally cultivated in Asia Minor, Marco Polo
    > brought back some cuttings from the tree to Italy along
    > with the now famous spaghetti plants.
    >
    > About 100 years later there were fields of semolina
    > spaghetti growing throughout the region simultaneously the
    > lemon pepper trees had flourished in the moist climate of
    > the boot and the harvests were growing as was the
    > popularity of the lemon pepper spice.
    >
    > The little lemon pepper berries are usually allowed to
    > ripen and dry right on the tree in the late summer. The
    > tree beaters come along with very long sticks and pieces
    > of cloth which they lay under the branches. They then hit
    > the branches with the sticks so the berries fall off onto
    > the cloth.
    >
    > In the very early years the berries were ground into a
    > fine powder and inhaled into the nose much the same as
    > snuff. They even had very ornate lemon pepper boxes for
    > the powder. Unfortunately the buzz was so great that the
    > powder became addictive.
    >
    > Legend has it that one day an Italian had too much wine
    > and accidentally spilled some of the powder onto a piece
    > of veal, and that was the birth of the use of the powder
    > as a food flavoring agent.
    >
    > Dimitri

    See? *This* is why it's good to have our friendly
    neighborhood Cultural Anthropologist hanging around here.

    Well done, Dimitri

    ---jkb

    --
    "I drank what?"

    -- Socrates
     
  9. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 17:12:56 -0600, Katra
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My label says:
    >
    >Black pepper and other spices, Rice flour, Lemon powder,
    >Garlic, Citric Acid, and Calcium stearate (a flow agent).

    Usually the citric acid outweighs the lemon flavoring.

    Lemme guess - Bolners Fiesta Brand? The rice flour
    gives it away.

    -sw
     
  10. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

  11. Doug Weller

    Doug Weller Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 17:12:56 -0600, Katra wrote:

    > Lemon pepper spice is the one thing I probably use the
    > most of. ;-)

    Me too. I generally use McCormick's which I buy in large
    quantities when I visit the States.

    Doug
     
  12. "Anthony" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a
    > > mixture of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there
    > > a vegetable called a lemon pepper?
    >
    > Not a vegetable but actually a fruit, the lemon pepper
    > grows in Zanzibar
    and
    > there is an annual Lemon Pepper Festival at harvest
    > time, in August. Locally it is counted an aphrodisiac of
    > considerable power, but many anthropologists aver that
    > this is a tale made up by the local lads so that they
    > can pretend to be in its uncontrollable grip and have
    > their wicked
    way
    > despite the (probably phony) squeals of protest coming
    > from the lassies. Anyhow, if you make the trip at that
    > time you're sure to have fun.
    >
    >

    ahahahaha...nicely done

    Jack Pepper de Citron
     
  13. This is true, however, the Plant Protection Quarantine
    division of the USDA has banned the import of lemon peppers
    until further notice. This is due to the fact that they can
    carry a citrus canker, which currently destroys citrus crops
    in California and Florida. This is not the first ban, but
    this one is expected to last a long time.

    Technically, it is still legal to sell them if it can be
    proven they were imported before May 2002, and if they test
    negative for the canker. The USDA can seize pretty much
    whatever they want.

    Or is it Sichuan Peppercorns? Oh well.... Frank

    Dimitri wrote:

    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>what's the deal with lemon pepper? is this just a mixture
    >>of some lemon stuff and some pepper? or is there a
    >>vegetable called a lemon pepper?
    >
    >
    >
    > Where have you been hiding?
    >
    > Lemon Pepper comes from the lemon pepper tree. Although it
    > was originally cultivated in Asia Minor, Marco Polo
    > brought back some cuttings from the tree to Italy along
    > with the now famous spaghetti plants.
    >
    > About 100 years later there were fields of semolina
    > spaghetti growing throughout the region simultaneously the
    > lemon pepper trees had flourished in the moist climate of
    > the boot and the harvests were growing as was the
    > popularity of the lemon pepper spice.
    >
    > The little lemon pepper berries are usually allowed to
    > ripen and dry right on the tree in the late summer. The
    > tree beaters come along with very long sticks and pieces
    > of cloth which they lay under the branches. They then hit
    > the branches with the sticks so the berries fall off onto
    > the cloth.
    >
    > In the very early years the berries were ground into a
    > fine powder and inhaled into the nose much the same as
    > snuff. They even had very ornate lemon pepper boxes for
    > the powder. Unfortunately the buzz was so great that the
    > powder became addictive.
    >
    > Legend has it that one day an Italian had too much wine
    > and accidentally spilled some of the powder onto a piece
    > of veal, and that was the birth of the use of the powder
    > as a food flavoring agent.
    >
    > Dimitri
     
  14. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    "Kswck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > And it's great with that small Italian town that grows its
    > spaghetti on trees-or didn't you ever see that commercial?
    >
    Wasn't that an April 1 show on BBC, narrated by Richard
    Dimbleby? Damn funny anyway.
     
  15. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    John Gaughan wrote:
    >
    > Dimitri wrote:
    > > Lemon Pepper comes from the lemon pepper tree.
    >
    > What about garlic salt?

    It's made for garlic slugs. blacksalt ObFood: Costco is
    getting some crates of lovely red grapefruit. EAsy to peel
    and sweet,sweet,sweet.
     
  16. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 17:12:56 -0600, Katra
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >My label says:
    > >
    > >Black pepper and other spices, Rice flour, Lemon powder,
    > >Garlic, Citric Acid, and Calcium stearate (a flow agent).
    >
    > Usually the citric acid outweighs the lemon flavoring.
    >
    > Lemme guess - Bolners Fiesta Brand? The rice flour gives
    > it away.
    >
    > -sw

    Yes, Fiesta. :)

    It's the only one that I've been able to find that makes a
    salt free one.

    If I wanted 50% salt, I'd add my own!

    K.

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    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  17. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Doug Weller <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 17:12:56 -0600, Katra wrote:
    >
    > > Lemon pepper spice is the one thing I probably use the
    > > most of. ;-)
    >
    > Me too. I generally use McCormick's which I buy in large
    > quantities when I visit the States.
    >
    > Doug

    Does McCormick make a salt free? I'd like to get away from
    some of the addititives....

    K.

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  18. Kswck

    Kswck Guest

  19. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Katra wrote:

    > Yes, Fiesta. :)
    >
    > It's the only one that I've been able to find that makes a
    > salt free one.
    >
    > If I wanted 50% salt, I'd add my own!

    Is Mrs. Dash bad? nancy
     
  20. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra wrote:
    >
    > > Yes, Fiesta. :)
    > >
    > > It's the only one that I've been able to find that makes
    > > a salt free one.
    > >
    > > If I wanted 50% salt, I'd add my own!
    >
    > Is Mrs. Dash bad? nancy

    It's not the same thing. At all. ;-)

    K.

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    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
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