LeMond frame filled with water!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Shayne Wissler, Sep 13, 2003.

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  1. Several days ago I was out riding and it started to rain really hard. When I got home I dried my
    bike off. Yesterday I went for a ride, and when I leaned my bike over, rusty water dripped out from
    inside the frame! I noticed that there were small holes in the frame, near the axel on the chain and
    seat stays.

    Now this is probably not news to you tech gurus, but when I saw those holes I was wondering why on
    earth they'd be there, and if there, why they aren't plugged up at the factory?

    How can I make sure the water is all out? Is there something I should plug the holes up with so this
    doesn't happen again?

    Shayne Wissler
     
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  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 19:05:35 GMT, Shayne Wissler <[email protected]> may have said:

    >Several days ago I was out riding and it started to rain really hard. When I got home I dried my
    >bike off. Yesterday I went for a ride, and when I leaned my bike over, rusty water dripped out from
    >inside the frame! I noticed that there were small holes in the frame, near the axel on the chain
    >and seat stays.
    >
    >Now this is probably not news to you tech gurus, but when I saw those holes I was wondering why on
    >earth they'd be there, and if there, why they aren't plugged up at the factory?

    They are present to ensure that during the welding and brazing of the frame, the internal pressure
    is relieved.

    >How can I make sure the water is all out?

    Pull the seatpost, flip the bike over, drain anything that comes out that way, flip and rock it to
    put each of the holes in the tubes at a low point until they finish draining, and then park it in
    the sun for a few hours. No sun? Cold weather? Park it over a ventilation register or some such.
    Truly obsessed with getting it dry inside and, and possessed of the time to do such things? Pop the
    fork and BB out, dry things, and reassemble. (Take the opportunity to grease the steerer bearings if
    you want to.)

    >Is there something I should plug the holes up with so this doesn't happen again?

    In my opinion, no. Water will probably still get in somewhere. It's better to have a way for it
    to get out.

    Some people like to make sure there's a hole drilled in the bottom of the BB tube to allow water to
    drain. Opinions vary both on the necessity and the advisability of that.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  3. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > In my opinion, no. Water will probably still get in somewhere. It's better to have a way for it to
    > get out.
    >
    > Some people like to make sure there's a hole drilled in the bottom of the BB tube to allow water
    > to drain. Opinions vary both on the necessity and the advisability of that.
    >

    In ancient times, half the BB shell was cut out for show! Colnago comes to mind....however, in this
    day and age of alu BB shells, a small hole, say
    1/8" or less, is more adviseable. I'm certain it will have little effect on the overall
    durability of your frame. And it means you don't have to worry about a pint of water sloshing
    around in your BB.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  4. On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 19:05:35 +0000, Shayne Wissler wrote:

    > Now this is probably not news to you tech gurus, but when I saw those holes I was wondering why on
    > earth they'd be there, and if there, why they aren't plugged up at the factory?

    They are there to allow hot air to escape during welding/brazing. They are not where your
    water got in.

    The water gets in typically at the seatpost. It gets a lot of spray from the rear wheel, and the
    water coating the post just slides down inside. Using a lot of grease on the post stops this, and
    also prevents the post from welding itself to the frame.
    >
    > How can I make sure the water is all out? Is there something I should plug the holes up with so
    > this doesn't happen again?

    Plugging up the vent holes will not matter.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Do not worry about your difficulties in mathematics, I can _`\(,_ | assure you that mine
    are all greater. -- A. Einstein (_)/ (_) |
     
  5. Werehatrack wrote:

    >>How can I make sure the water is all out?
    >
    > Pull the seatpost, flip the bike over, drain anything that comes out that way, flip and rock it to
    > put each of the holes in the tubes at a low point until they finish draining, and then park it in
    > the sun for a few hours. No sun? Cold weather? Park it over a ventilation register or some such.
    > Truly obsessed with getting it dry inside and, and possessed of the time to do such things? Pop
    > the fork and BB out, dry things, and reassemble. (Take the opportunity to grease the steerer
    > bearings if you want to.)

    Thanks--I didn't realize all the tubes were open to each other at the joints. I tried a hair-dryer
    blowing down the seat tube and air came out of those holes. Seems like a good way to dry it.

    Since I've gotten dirty water in my BB, does that mean it should be taken apart and re-greased? Is
    this a ritual one must do after every wet ride?

    Shayne Wissler
     
  6. On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 02:22:24 +0000, Robin Hubert wrote:

    > That's what Jobst says but doesn't jibe with my experience. I can't imagine having the damn
    > interface more clogged up with grease than I've already managed. I also consulted my frame builder
    > about this and was informed that there's really nothing you can do to stop it (ok, a rear fender
    > helps alot).

    And that does not coincide with my experience. We've had a lot of rain here this Spring/Summer, and
    a well-greased post has kept the water out of my frame.
    >
    >> and also prevents the post from welding itself to the frame.
    >
    > I figure grease also promotes seizing due to emulsification of grease/water due to the movement of
    > the post inside the frame.

    I don't think so, and I am certainly not willing to test such a theory.

    > It works that way on quill stems, right? That's why the post needs to be periodically removed,
    > cleaned, and regreased.

    No, it's because the grease washes out, eventually.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or _`\(,_ | that we are to
    stand by the president right or wrong, is not (_)/ (_) | only unpatriotic and servile, but is
    morally treasonable to the American public. --Theodore Roosevelt
     
  7. Alfred Klek

    Alfred Klek Guest

    > Since I've gotten dirty water in my BB, does that mean it should be taken apart and re-greased? Is
    > this a ritual one must do after every wet ride?

    your bike probably has a sealed cartridge BB. repacking is not a practical option as they are not
    readily designed for this procedure. alfred
     
  8. Wannagofast

    Wannagofast Guest

    if not sealed, then the answer is yes, repack it.
    1/8 hole is probably small as grit coming down the seat tube will likely clump and clog the hole.
    i'd use a hole between 3/16 and 1/4, say 7/32". make sure your cable guide doesn't cover it up as
    well as it is at the true bottom as possible.

    "Alfred Klek" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > Since I've gotten dirty water in my BB, does that mean it should be
    taken
    > > apart and re-greased? Is this a ritual one must do after every wet ride?
    >
    > your bike probably has a sealed cartridge BB. repacking is not a
    practical
    > option as they are not readily designed for this procedure. alfred
     
  9. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 02:22:24 +0000, Robin Hubert wrote:
    >
    > > That's what Jobst says but doesn't jibe with my experience. I can't imagine having the damn
    > > interface more clogged up with grease than I've already managed. I also consulted my frame
    > > builder about this and was informed that there's really nothing you can do to stop it (ok, a
    > > rear fender helps alot).
    >
    > And that does not coincide with my experience. We've had a lot of rain here this Spring/Summer,
    > and a well-greased post has kept the water out of my frame.
    > >
    > >> and also prevents the post from welding itself to the frame.
    > >
    > > I figure grease also promotes seizing due to emulsification of grease/water due to the movement
    > > of the post inside the frame.
    >
    > I don't think so, and I am certainly not willing to test such a theory.
    >
    > > It works that way on quill stems, right? That's why the post needs to be periodically removed,
    > > cleaned, and regreased.
    >
    > No, it's because the grease washes out, eventually.
    >

    Washes *where*, pray tell?

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  10. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 19:05:35 GMT, Shayne Wissler <[email protected]> may have said:
    >
    > >Several days ago I was out riding and it started to rain really hard. When I got home I dried my
    > >bike off. Yesterday I went for a ride, and when I leaned my bike over, rusty water dripped out
    > >from inside the frame! I noticed that there were small holes in the frame, near the axel on the
    > >chain and seat stays.
    > >
    > >Now this is probably not news to you tech gurus, but when I saw those holes I was wondering why
    > >on earth they'd be there, and if there, why they aren't plugged up at the factory?
    >
    > They are present to ensure that during the welding and brazing of the frame, the internal pressure
    > is relieved.
    >
    > >How can I make sure the water is all out?
    >
    > Pull the seatpost, flip the bike over, drain anything that comes out that way, flip and rock it to
    > put each of the holes in the tubes at a low point until they finish draining, and then park it in
    > the sun for a few hours. No sun? Cold weather? Park it over a ventilation register or some such.
    > Truly obsessed with getting it dry inside and, and possessed of the time to do such things? Pop
    > the fork and BB out, dry things, and reassemble. (Take the opportunity to grease the steerer
    > bearings if you want to.)
    >
    > >Is there something I should plug the holes up with so this doesn't happen again?
    >
    > In my opinion, no. Water will probably still get in somewhere. It's better to have a way for it to
    > get out.
    >
    > Some people like to make sure there's a hole drilled in the bottom of the BB tube to allow water
    > to drain. Opinions vary both on the necessity and the advisability of that.

    If you are totally paranoid about it, spend a coupla bucks, get some FrameSaver and treat the inside
    of the frame. I have heard it recommended as frequently as an annual ritual and as infrequently as
    once in the life of a frame. I would adhere to the suggestions on the can.

    Other posts regarding this issue suggest that the frame will fail before rust will eat it up. Maybe
    ignore it, and if you can't, FrameSaver.

    App

    App
     
  11. Bd

    Bd Guest

    "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > In my opinion, no. Water will probably still get in somewhere. It's better to have a way for it
    > > to get out.
    > >
    > > Some people like to make sure there's a hole drilled in the bottom of the BB tube to allow water
    > > to drain. Opinions vary both on the necessity and the advisability of that.
    > >
    >
    > In ancient times, half the BB shell was cut out for show! Colnago comes
    to
    > mind....however, in this day and age of alu BB shells, a small hole, say
    > 1/8" or less, is more adviseable. I'm certain it will have little effect
    on
    > the overall durability of your frame. And it means you don't have to
    worry
    > about a pint of water sloshing around in your BB.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Scott..
    >
    >

    Ancient???? Oh man, I didn't know I was that old. I do admit that I like being able to spin my Super
    over in the workstand and seeing that cutout. Need I mention the beauty of lugs as well?

    C
     
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