LeMond on Ethics, Doping, and the Future of Cycling



Crankyfeet

New Member
Jun 5, 2007
10,817
0
36
This hour long video of a conference LeMond gave on doping is quite interesting. Greg is a little nervous in front of the crowd, but he gives some interesting insights on his career, some anecdotal experiences around dopers, and his views on the problem.

The video was sourced through a link in CFA.
 

TheDarkLord

New Member
Dec 24, 2007
3,887
0
0
Crankyfeet said:
This hour long video of a conference LeMond gave on doping is quite interesting. Greg is a little nervous in front of the crowd, but he gives some interesting insights on his career, some anecdotal experiences around dopers, and his views on the problem.

The video was sourced through a link in CFA.
Can you post a gist of what he says? I don't think I will ever get to watch the hour long video.
 

Crankyfeet

New Member
Jun 5, 2007
10,817
0
36
TheDarkLord said:
Can you post a gist of what he says? I don't think I will ever get to watch the hour long video.
Copy of post from FID.

I may when I have some time. Most of it is fairly generic views on doping that we are aware of. The interesting bits to me were when he related specific anecdotal stories regarding what he was feeling in '91 when he expected to be one of the strongest riders in the peleton, but the average speed in that particular year was like 7kmh higher in one particular race and he was struggling just to hold on. He at first thought something was wrong with him... but it was only later that he found out through the other riders that a lot of the teams were on "medical" programs (which included the new wonder drug... EPO). And his team sponsors were putting pressure on the management because the team was not getting any wins for the sponsors $6 mill investment. He also said that in the past he did 100 plus races in a season, so he was dope tested all the time. Nowadays with riders taking months off to train, or even some who only focus on one race in the season... it is more easy to dope and more neccessary to have the year long testing program out of competition.

There were many other stories (like in 1984, blood doping was legal), but it is hard to summarize them all without writing a 3,000 word essay.
 

Cobblestones

New Member
Jul 2, 2007
592
0
0
Crankyfeet said:
Copy of post from FID.

I may when I have some time. Most of it is fairly generic views on doping that we are aware of. The interesting bits to me were when he related specific anecdotal stories regarding what he was feeling in '91 when he expected to be one of the strongest riders in the peleton, but the average speed in that particular year was like 7kmh higher in one particular race and he was struggling just to hold on. He at first thought something was wrong with him... but it was only later that he found out through the other riders that a lot of the teams were on "medical" programs (which included the new wonder drug... EPO). And his team sponsors were putting pressure on the management because the team was not getting any wins for the sponsors $6 mill investment. He also said that in the past he did 100 plus races in a season, so he was dope tested all the time. Nowadays with riders taking months off to train, or even some who only focus on one race in the season... it is more easy to dope and more neccessary to have the year long testing program out of competition.

There were many other stories (like in 1984, blood doping was legal), but it is hard to summarize them all without writing a 3,000 word essay.

91, the first year Indurain won Le Tour. It was when relatively large cyclist began to climb reasonably well.
 

Crankyfeet

New Member
Jun 5, 2007
10,817
0
36
Cobblestones said:
91, the first year Indurain won Le Tour. It was when relatively large cyclist began to climb reasonably well.
LeMond was no chipmunk though, was he?
 

Crankyfeet

New Member
Jun 5, 2007
10,817
0
36
There are 16 chapter headings on the right so one can jump to a subject of interest. In the chapter 7 "Effective Testing", LeMond describes an example of Verbruggen's attitude and the UCI's complicity and corruption by relating the story of Denis Zanette's team's reaction to his death in 2003. His DS stated publicly afterwards that cycling needs to take a long hard look in the mirror, and Verbruggen's response was "If you don't like it, get out". He is also more confident of McQuaid and Gripper, but says that he feels the drug testing authority should be independent, and not be the UCI, but an organization like WADA who don't care if the race winner or the one coming last tests positive, and don't care about the ramifications for the sport.

He said the cyclists know what's going on, and are distrustful of the process. He said he also was distrustful and cleaned his own vials with distilled water prior to a test, and sealed the lid with his thumbprint. He thinks the labs have nothing to do with the corruption, but if there is any corruption going on, it's in the chain of custody under UCI from the cyclist handing them the sample to the UCI handing it to the lab.
 

jimmypop

New Member
Feb 20, 2008
439
0
0
kennf said:
5'10", 155-160 pounds (during the Tour). And a VO2max of 92.
Remember, VO2Max and inherent physical abilities mean nothing if you have a higher than average cadence.
 

Powerful Pete

New Member
May 29, 2004
3,866
0
0
53
jimmypop said:
Remember, VO2Max and inherent physical abilities mean nothing if you have a higher than average cadence.
LOL, that was unexpected but very funny. :D
 

OAR8

New Member
Mar 13, 2008
87
0
0
jimmypop said:
Remember, VO2Max and inherent physical abilities mean nothing if you have a higher than average cadence.
Only if the Big Mig tells you dis to be da facts! KNOW DIS, KNOW DIS.
 

Cipher

New Member
Sep 7, 2002
782
2
18
TheDarkLord said:
Can you post a gist of what he says? I don't think I will ever get to watch the hour long video.


Just listen to it, well worth the hour spent.
 

Crankyfeet

New Member
Jun 5, 2007
10,817
0
36
Cipher said:
Just listen to it, well worth the hour spent.
Cipher... You've been a member so long... they didn't have avatar size restrictions when you joined... :p

Welcome back... please stay for a while... :)
 

thoughtforfood

New Member
Jul 24, 2007
2,474
0
0
54
Crankyfeet said:
Cipher... You've been a member so long... they didn't have avatar size restrictions when you joined... :p

Welcome back... please stay for a while... :)
I was thinking the same thing! I want a big avatar, do they have a cream or pump which will allow me to sport an avater of that size?
 

limerickman

Well-Known Member
Jan 5, 2004
16,130
220
63
Crankyfeet said:
Copy of post from FID.

I may when I have some time. Most of it is fairly generic views on doping that we are aware of. The interesting bits to me were when he related specific anecdotal stories regarding what he was feeling in '91 when he expected to be one of the strongest riders in the peleton, but the average speed in that particular year was like 7kmh higher in one particular race and he was struggling just to hold on. He at first thought something was wrong with him... but it was only later that he found out through the other riders that a lot of the teams were on "medical" programs (which included the new wonder drug... EPO). And his team sponsors were putting pressure on the management because the team was not getting any wins for the sponsors $6 mill investment. He also said that in the past he did 100 plus races in a season, so he was dope tested all the time. Nowadays with riders taking months off to train, or even some who only focus on one race in the season... it is more easy to dope and more neccessary to have the year long testing program out of competition.

There were many other stories (like in 1984, blood doping was legal), but it is hard to summarize them all without writing a 3,000 word essay.


Yep, Millar - that's Robert Millar - tells of the same type of anecdote.

It was the Criterium International and he said that the bunch were climbing at an unmerciful speed (Millar was probably one of the best climbers ever).
He said he looked around the group and Jalabert, riding with ONCE, was beside him as they climbed.
He (Millar) was gasping for air, such was the spreed of the ascent - Jalabert, not known for his climbing prowess at that juncture, was pedalling away beside him with apparent ease, mouth firmly closed.

As Millar put it "I wish someone could explain to me, how so many riders can climb some of the steepest ascents in Europe - and not appear to be even breathing. Or maybe it was just my imagination playing tricks again".
 

Cipher

New Member
Sep 7, 2002
782
2
18
Crankyfeet said:
Cipher... You've been a member so long... they didn't have avatar size restrictions when you joined... :p

Welcome back... please stay for a while... :)


I would guess that I don't dare change it (my avatar) for fear that it will be reduced substantially in size!
:D
 

Crankyfeet

New Member
Jun 5, 2007
10,817
0
36
Cipher said:
I would guess that I don't dare change it (my avatar) for fear that it will be reduced substantially in size!
:D
I would concur. And it's not only enormous... it's got huge veins popping out of it. You are the envy of every guy on the forum... :D
 

Flyer

Banned
Sep 20, 2004
2,961
0
0
Crankyfeet said:
This hour long video of a conference LeMond gave on doping is quite interesting. Greg is a little nervous in front of the crowd, but he gives some interesting insights on his career, some anecdotal experiences around dopers, and his views on the problem.

The video was sourced through a link in CFA.
rree