Lemond Ti frames

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Tony, May 26, 2003.

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  1. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Anyone have any experience with Lemond Ti frames I am interested in the Tete d Course and
    the Victoire
     
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  2. Andres Muro

    Andres Muro Guest

    The most important thing about Lemond frames is that they have shallow seat tube angles and longish
    top tube. It tends to put the rider far behind the bottom bracket. If you have long femurs, and if
    you have very good flexibility in your hams and lower back, this is ok. However, if you have
    shortish legs, like I do, and you are not very flexible, you'll end up with a sore lower back, and
    sitting at the saddles nose.

    Regarding looks and finish, I've seen one and it looks very nice.

    Andres

    "Tony" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Anyone have any experience with Lemond Ti frames I am interested in the Tete d Course and the
    > Victoire
     
  3. Steve

    Steve Guest

    Well.. that's the myth at least.

    In reality, the seat tube angle in a typical 55 frame is 73 degrees, which is within a half degree
    of a Trek, Klein, Cannondale or Litespeed Classic, as example, all of which are between 73 and 73.5.
    This isn't enough a difference to "put the rider far behind the bottom bracket" You need to go to a
    ST angle of 72 or so before you'd notice the difference. Also note that how much seat post offset
    you have and how much saddle rail can change your positioning, so you don't have to be stting on the
    nose of the saddle.

    Likewise, the TT length is a shade longer at 56.5, but that's not that far off the typical for
    assorted frames which run 55.5 to 56.2. My point is the geometry isn't that different that I would
    let it bother you.

    I just replaced a Klein Quantum frame under warrenty with a LeMond Victoire frame and have no issues
    with it's slightly longer TT as it was easy enough to put a 110 stem on instead of the 120 I had on
    the Klein. Note that I'm also used to a steel Heron that has a longish TT for the frame size at 57cm
    effective, thus the LeMond fits fine.

    Steve B.

    "andres muro" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > The most important thing about Lemond frames is that they have shallow seat tube angles and
    > longish top tube. It tends to put the rider far behind the bottom bracket. If you have long
    > femurs, and if you have very good flexibility in your hams and lower back, this is ok. However, if
    > you have shortish legs, like I do, and you are not very flexible, you'll end up with a sore lower
    > back, and sitting at the saddles nose.
    >
    > Regarding looks and finish, I've seen one and it looks very nice.
     
  4. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In reality, the seat tube angle in a typical 55 frame is 73 degrees, which is within a half degree
    >of a Trek, Klein, Cannondale or Litespeed Classic, as example, all of which are between 73 and
    >73.5. This isn't enough a difference to "put the rider far behind the bottom bracket" You need to
    >go to a ST angle of 72 or so before you'd notice the difference. Also note that how much seat post
    >offset you have and how much saddle rail can change your positioning, so you don't have to be
    >stting on the nose of the saddle.
    >
    >Likewise, the TT length is a shade longer at 56.5, but that's not that far off the typical for
    >assorted frames which run 55.5 to 56.2. My point is the geometry isn't that different that I would
    >let it bother you.

    I should mention that the two things (slacker seat tube and longer top tube) tend to cancel each
    other out.

    Since we should assume the saddle ends up in the "right position" no matter WHAT the seat tube
    angle, all the seat tube angle really does is to determine what point on the saddle's rails the seat
    tube clamp will be. If the seat tube is 1 degree more slack (72 vs. 73 degrees), the saddle will be
    moved about 1cm forward in the clamp.

    This effectively "shortens" the top tube, since your butt doesn't really care about the
    configuration of the tubes holding it up - only about the position of the saddle relative to the
    bars and the crank.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame

    >I just replaced a Klein Quantum frame under warrenty with a LeMond Victoire frame and have no
    >issues with it's slightly longer TT as it was easy enough to put a 110 stem on instead of the 120 I
    >had on the Klein. Note that I'm also used to a steel Heron that has a longish TT for the frame size
    >at 57cm effective, thus the LeMond fits fine.
    >
    >Steve B.
    >
    >"andres muro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >> The most important thing about Lemond frames is that they have shallow seat tube angles and
    >> longish top tube. It tends to put the rider far behind the bottom bracket. If you have long
    >> femurs, and if you have very good flexibility in your hams and lower back, this is ok. However,
    >> if you have shortish legs, like I do, and you are not very flexible, you'll end up with a sore
    >> lower back, and sitting at the saddles nose.
    >>
    >> Regarding looks and finish, I've seen one and it looks very nice.
     
  5. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Tony" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Anyone have any experience with Lemond Ti frames I am interested in the
    Tete
    > d Course and the Victoire

    I have exactly 110 miles on my Victoire, but it's my 8th road bike in 15 years, so I have a pretty
    good feel for how it's different then my Klein Quantums (2 versions), Heron Road, Miyata Tourer (2
    versions), Peckham Tourer and Fuji Roubaix welded steel.

    And I know that there's no amount of vertical compliance that I'm supposed to be able to feel....

    But, it rides like stiffer steel. It feels "tighter" all around, handles a bit better then the
    Heron in fast downhill's, feels like it has less "give" when accelerating - or at least less lost
    power. It has less "buzz" and shock thru the fork then did the Klein, which had a Kinesis Carbon
    wedge fork.

    I'm running Open Pro rims, 32 spoke with Forteza 23mm tires at 125 psi. It doesn't feel a whole lot
    less compliant then the Heron which has Ruffy Tuffy 27mm tires at 105-110 psi on MA3 rims. Same
    saddle too. It has a bit more b-bracket flex then the Klein, but a whole lot less then the Heron.
    The fork is much stiffer when standing then the Heron, which I can actually see flex.

    It's a very stable bike, very predictable.

    The primary difference between the Victoire and the Tete seems to be the carbon seat stays on the
    Tete D Course, which also has a slightly shorter wheel base and chainstays.

    Also check out reviews on http://www.roadbikereview.com/defaultcrx.aspx

    Steve B.
     
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