Let's try posting a few Handy Hints-things that make cooking easier.

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Nancree, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    ~~~for those with arthritic hands, screw a cup hook
    underneath a kitchen cabinet. To open those pop top cans,
    hook the loop onto the cup hook, and pull down. (someone
    else posted this, so take credit, whoever you are.) It works
    painlessly.To open those plastic zip bags that deli meats
    come in, I use pliers--needlenose ones work best.

    ~~~for an easy breakfast, toast a piece of good bread
    (Orowheat Extra Sour rye is good.) Then, with the back of a
    spoon, press down the bread inside the crust making a
    depression. Crack a raw egg into the depression and cook to
    your taste. Start with 30 seconds, if that isn't done enough
    for you, try more. You don't have to wash a single dish, and
    you can even walk out the door to work while eating it.
    (precaution: Eggs often explode, so cover with a piece of
    wax paper, or plastic plate, or microwave shield.) ~~~~Keep
    your poppy seed and cayenne and paprika in your freezer. It
    keeps the little critters away. I think they're hooked on
    poppy seed (opium?) the little rascals. More later. Join in
    if you like. Nancree
     
    Tags:


  2. Puester

    Puester Guest

    --Thread a rubber band through the hole in a binder clip or
    a paper clip. Hang it from an upper cabinet knob and use it
    to hold the recipe card or loose page you are using to keep
    it in sight and off the counter.

    --A toddler can be kept busy and within sight with some
    plastic measuring cups, spoons, and a bowl of water in the
    kitchen sink. Be prepared for lots of spills and
    overflowing!

    --If you keep a large variety of spices in a cabinet, they
    are easier to find if you group them by category: blends,
    savory, baking/sweet/leaveners, ethnic, etc.

    --Recipes with lots of ingredients are easier if you use mise-en-
    place: measure the ingredients and place in small bowls,
    putting containers away before starting. Think of the food
    tv sets and how the chefs have everything at hand.

    --Read through an entire recipe just before starting so you
    have and idea of the flow. Preheat the oven then if
    necessary.

    gloria p
     
  3. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    Nancree wrote:
    > ~~~for an easy breakfast

    I like making breakfast burritos the day before and
    microwaving them in the morning. I get my eggs, tomatoes,
    cheese, bacon, etc. all in a mess-free, convenient wrapper.
    This works well at least for work days when I do not have
    time to cook a "real" breakfast.

    --
    John Gaughan http://www.johngaughan.net/
    [email protected]
     
  4. Buy several inexpensive plastic measuring cups and keep one
    in the flour, one in the sugar, one in the rolled oats, etc.
    You won't need to wash them each time you use them. This
    works with measuring spoons too.

    --Lia
     
  5. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:

    > >Buy several inexpensive plastic measuring cups and keep
    > >one in the flour, one in the sugar, one in the rolled
    > >oats, etc. You won't need to wash them each time you use
    > >them. This works with measuring spoons too.
    > >
    > >Lia
    >
    > Anyone who considers themself a baker would never consider
    > measuring flour other than with a scale.... I don't recall
    > ever in my life measuring flour with a cup... I do keep a
    > scoop in my flour container.
    >
    > Sheldon

    And do your cookbooks measure flour with a scale???

    All the ones I've ever seen measure them by volume, not
    weight. :p

    Sheesh Shel'!

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems-
    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  6. PENMART01 wrote:

    >>Buy several inexpensive plastic measuring cups and keep
    >>one in the flour, one in the sugar, one in the rolled
    >>oats, etc. You won't need to wash them each time you use
    >>them. This works with measuring spoons too.
    >
    > Anyone who considers themself a baker would never consider
    > measuring flour other than with a scale.... I don't recall
    > ever in my life measuring flour with a cup... I do keep a
    > scoop in my flour container.

    Besides flour (I weigh AP at 128g/C and cake flour to
    130g/C) what other ingredients are better weighed than
    measured by volume? How about brown sugar?
     
  7. Darryl L. Pierce wrote:

    > Besides flour (I weigh AP at 128g/C and cake flour to
    > 130g/C) what other ingredients are better weighed than
    > measured by volume? How about brown sugar?

    It depends on what you mean by better. If I want to whip up
    a quick batch of brownies, I measure by volume because
    that's the measurement in my cookbook; it is faster and more
    convenient for me to use measuring cups; being off a little
    in one direction or the other won't kill the recipe; I've
    made the recipe enough times that I can add a little flour
    if the batter looks too wet for me. All told, volume
    measures are better for me in that situation.

    If I were making a recipe I'd never seen before for bread
    for many loaves, I'd definitely measure by weight. It has
    been ages since I've worked in that situation, but it would
    be better by far to weigh for all the above reasons. The
    recipe would assuredly be given in weights; it would be more
    convenient to get out the scale than to pack flour into a
    quart measuring can; I wouldn't want to risk ruining that
    much bread because I got the measurement wrong; I wouldn't
    know how to adjust because I'd never seen the dough before.

    --Lia
     
  8. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    Our rental house here has much of the original equipment
    from the 1950's, including metal kitchen cabinets. We have
    learned to use them to our advantage by putting recipe cards
    or clippings on them with magnets. The recipes are at eye
    level and there's a lower risk of forgetting anything.

    If you're multiplying or dividing amounts of ingredients in
    a recipe, do the math first. Then take sticky notes, cover
    the original measurements, and write in the new amounts on
    the sticky notes. The narrow tab notes are best for this
    purpose. If you use the recipe often, you can just leave the
    sticky notes on it for future reference.

    In the food safety department, there's an easy way to handle
    meat and vegetables separately when you only have one
    cutting board and one good knife. Cut up the vegetables for
    the meal first, put them in bowls or pans as needed, then
    use the same cutting board and knife for the meat. This
    saves on washing and reduces the risk of cross-
    contamination.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  9. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Nancree" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : ~~~for those with arthritic hands, screw a cup hook
    : underneath
    a kitchen
    : cabinet. To open those pop top cans, hook the loop
    : onto the cup
    hook, and pull
    : down. (someone else posted this, so take credit,
    : whoever you
    are.) It works
    : painlessly.To open those plastic zip bags that deli
    : meats come
    in, I use
    : pliers--needlenose ones work best.
    :
    : ~~~for an easy breakfast, toast a piece of good bread
    : (Orowheat
    Extra Sour rye
    : is good.) Then, with the back of a spoon, press down
    : the bread
    inside the
    : crust making a depression. Crack a raw egg into the
    : depression
    and cook to
    : your taste. Start with 30 seconds, if that isn't
    : done enough
    for you, try more.
    : You don't have to wash a single dish, and you can
    : even walk
    out the door to
    : work while eating it. (precaution: Eggs often explode, so
    cover with a piece
    : of wax paper, or plastic plate, or microwave shield.)
    : ~~~~Keep your poppy seed and cayenne and paprika in your
    freezer. It keeps
    : the little critters away. I think they're hooked on
    : poppy seed
    (opium?) the
    : little rascals. More later. Join in if you like. Nancree
    =============

    These first couple are more for parents with young children.

    1. Use a pizza cutter for cutting pancakes. This is esp.
    wonderful when you have to cut up the kids pancakes.
    It's fast and you actually have a good chance of your
    own pancakes still being hot after cutting up theirs. ;)

    2. Slice a hot dog lengthwise before cutting into rounds.
    The half-moon shape lessens the chances of choking.

    3. Keep a bottle of hand lotion near the sink for use
    after washing dishes... also, wrap a rubber band or
    two around it to help you grip it. Nothing like having
    wet or freshly lotioned hands and not be able to grip
    the bottle!

    4. For less clutter - mount a memo board/calendar *inside*
    one of your cabinets to keep your notes, phone numbers,
    etc. Easily found yet kept out of sight of company.

    5. Have *family* cards (think business cards) made. Ours
    has our names, address, home & cell numbers along with
    our E-mail address. Be sure to keep one by each phone in
    case of emergency (as in a baby sitter or house sitter
    is in your home and needs to make emergency/urgent
    call). This could also come in handy if you've recently
    moved into a new home!

    6. Presuming you have the storage capacity or hungry
    neighbors - cook in bulk when you can. 4 meatloaves
    instead of just 1 or 2. Big pot of soup instead of just
    enough for 1 meal.

    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  10. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <cjfullerSPAMORAMA-
    [email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > In the food safety department, there's an easy way to
    > handle meat and vegetables separately when you only have
    > one cutting board and one good knife. Cut up the
    > vegetables for the meal first, put them in bowls or pans
    > as needed, then use the same cutting board and knife for
    > the meat. This saves on washing and reduces the risk of
    > cross-contamination.
    >
    I bought some flexible plastic cutting sheets that I place
    over my wooden cutting board. When I'm cutting meat I just
    use a plastic cutting sheet, then pick the whole thing up
    and transfer to my cooking vessel.

    If cooking away from home and only one cutting board is
    available, you could simply turn the cutting board over for
    a clean surface, and only have to clean it once.
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  11. On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 03:14:09 GMT, Puester <[email protected]>
    arranged random neurons, so they looked like this:

    >--If you keep a large variety of spices in a cabinet, they
    >are easier to find if you group them by category: blends,
    >savory, baking/sweet/leaveners, ethnic, etc.

    Okay, call me anal retentive, but my spices are alphabetized
    (which requires re-alphabetizing after the 14 mo. old's
    visits, as my attached-to-the-wall-below-the-counter spice
    rack has become a major playing ground).

    And, if you wrap celery in aluminum foil, it lasts for
    weeks.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    good dinner." Anonymous.

    To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  12. On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 20:33:28 GMT, Donna Rose
    <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so they looked
    like this:

    >I bought some flexible plastic cutting sheets that I place
    >over my wooden cutting board. When I'm cutting meat I just
    >use a plastic cutting sheet, then pick the whole thing up
    >and transfer to my cooking vessel.

    I posted about liking these cutting sheets a while back and
    got flamed for not being environmentally correct. Sheesh.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    good dinner." Anonymous.

    To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  13. "Katra" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:
    >
    > > >Buy several inexpensive plastic measuring cups and keep
    > > >one in the flour, one in the sugar, one in the rolled
    > > >oats, etc. You won't need
    to
    > > >wash them each time you use them. This works with
    > > >measuring spoons
    too.
    > > >
    > > >Lia
    > >
    > > Anyone who considers themself a baker would never
    > > consider measuring
    flour
    > > other than with a scale.... I don't recall ever in my
    > > life measuring
    flour
    > > with a cup... I do keep a scoop in my flour container.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    >
    > And do your cookbooks measure flour with a scale???
    >
    > All the ones I've ever seen measure them by volume, not
    > weight. :p
    >
    > Sheesh Shel'!
    >
    > K.

    anything besides a couple of deep dish Tombstone pizzas.....
     
  14. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Okay, call me anal retentive, but my spices are
    > alphabetized
    >
    I don't find that anal retentive at all. That sounds
    completely normal to me. But then, I do the same thing :)

    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  15. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > I posted about liking these cutting sheets a while
    > back and got flamed for not being environmentally
    > correct. Sheesh.
    >
    I'm not talking about the disposable ones - these are
    reusable. I've had them for quite some time.
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  16. Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 03:14:09 GMT, Puester
    > <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so
    > they looked like this:
    >
    >>--If you keep a large variety of spices in a cabinet, they
    >>are easier to find if you group them by category: blends,
    >>savory, baking/sweet/leaveners, ethnic, etc.
    >
    > Okay, call me anal retentive, but my spices are
    > alphabetized (which requires re-alphabetizing after the 14
    > mo. old's visits, as my attached-to-the-wall-below-the-
    > counter spice rack has become a major playing ground).

    Mine _must_ be alphabetized as well, although I have them on
    multi-level turntables that fit in upper kitchen cabinets.

    > And, if you wrap celery in aluminum foil, it lasts
    > for weeks.

    I've got to try this. I don't always use celery quickly, and
    being able to keep it longer would be great.

    Wayne

    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA
    >
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    > had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    > been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    > good dinner." Anonymous.
    >
    > To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  17. Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 03:14:09 GMT, Puester
    > <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so
    > they looked like this:
    >
    >>--If you keep a large variety of spices in a cabinet, they
    >>are easier to find if you group them by category: blends,
    >>savory, baking/sweet/leaveners, ethnic, etc.
    >
    > Okay, call me anal retentive, but my spices are
    > alphabetized (which requires re-alphabetizing after the 14
    > mo. old's visits, as my attached-to-the-wall-below-the-
    > counter spice rack has become a major playing ground).

    Mine _must_ be alphabetized as well, although I have them on
    multi-level turntables that fit in upper kitchen cabinets.

    > And, if you wrap celery in aluminum foil, it lasts
    > for weeks.

    I've got to try this. I don't always use celery quickly, and
    being able to keep it longer would be great.

    Wayne

    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA
    >
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    > had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    > been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    > good dinner." Anonymous.
    >
    > To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  18. Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 03:14:09 GMT, Puester
    > <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so
    > they looked like this:
    >
    >>--If you keep a large variety of spices in a cabinet, they
    >>are easier to find if you group them by category: blends,
    >>savory, baking/sweet/leaveners, ethnic, etc.
    >
    > Okay, call me anal retentive, but my spices are
    > alphabetized (which requires re-alphabetizing after the 14
    > mo. old's visits, as my attached-to-the-wall-below-the-
    > counter spice rack has become a major playing ground).

    Mine _must_ be alphabetized as well, although I have them on
    multi-level turntables that fit in upper kitchen cabinets.

    > And, if you wrap celery in aluminum foil, it lasts
    > for weeks.

    I've got to try this. I don't always use celery quickly, and
    being able to keep it longer would be great.

    Wayne

    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA
    >
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    > had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    > been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    > good dinner." Anonymous.
    >
    > To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  19. Stark Raven

    Stark Raven Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Donna
    Rose <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > > I posted about liking these cutting sheets a while back
    > > and got flamed for not being environmentally correct.
    > > Sheesh.
    > >
    > I'm not talking about the disposable ones - these are
    > reusable. I've had them for quite some time.

    How do you anchor your sheets? Mine slide all over creation
    and I can't use the spongy cabinet liner that I use with my
    other cutting boards.
     
  20. Misnomer

    Misnomer Guest

    If the celery does get limp. cut into about 4 inch lengths
    and put in bowl / tupperware with water in the fridge for
    about an hour or 2.

    take care Liz

    Hey! Look what Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote :

    >> And, if you wrap celery in aluminum foil, it lasts
    >> for weeks.
    >
    >I've got to try this. I don't always use celery quickly,
    >and being able to keep it longer would be great.
    >
    >Wayne
     
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