Level saddle

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Per ElmsäTer, Apr 24, 2003.

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  1. I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten it,
    it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it to stick
    inbetween two notches, or reposition the notches?

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
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  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten it,
    > it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it to
    > stick inbetween two notches,
    or
    > reposition the notches?
    >
    > --
    > Perre

    Sounds like you need a different seatpost or saddle. I've had that problem with the seatpost/saddle
    alignment before. The solution is a different setup.

    Mike
     
  3. Per Elmsäter wrote:

    > I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten it,
    > it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it to
    > stick inbetween two notches, or reposition the notches?

    Is the amount of tilt enough to make the saddle uncomfortable? If so, you might consider a new
    seatpost that allows finer adjustments.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    On a paper submitted by a physicist colleague: "This isn't right. This isn't even wrong." --
    Wolfgang Pauli
     
  4. D.Putnam

    D.Putnam Guest

    Get a seatpost without notches. Such as a Thomson. Infinite adjustability.

    > I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten it,
    > it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it to
    > stick inbetween two notches,
    or
    > reposition the notches?
    >
    > --
    > Perre
    >
    > You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  5. Benjamin Lewis wrote:
    > Per Elmsäter wrote:
    >
    >> I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten
    >> it, it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it
    >> to stick inbetween two notches, or reposition the notches?
    >
    > Is the amount of tilt enough to make the saddle uncomfortable? If so, you might consider a new
    > seatpost that allows finer adjustments.

    The tilt is OK for rides up to 100 km. After that it starts getting a little uncomfortable. Probably
    because my back is getting tired and not holding me up the same way as when starting out. I could
    probably live with it, it just annoys me that I cannot set the tilt exactly where I want it.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  6. Second on the Thomson. Those things are strong as all-get-out, too.

    Jon Bond and while you're at it, get the matching thomson stem!

    D.Putnam wrote:
    > Get a seatpost without notches. Such as a Thomson. Infinite adjustability.
    >
    >
    >
    >>I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten it,
    >>it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it to
    >>stick inbetween two notches,
    >
    > or
    >
    >>reposition the notches?
    >>
    >>--
    >>Perre
    >>
    >>You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
    >>
    >>
    >
     
  7. Per Elmsäter wrote:

    > Benjamin Lewis wrote:
    >> Per Elmsäter wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten
    >>> it, it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it
    >>> to stick inbetween two notches, or reposition the notches?
    >>
    >> Is the amount of tilt enough to make the saddle uncomfortable? If so, you might consider a new
    >> seatpost that allows finer adjustments.
    >
    > The tilt is OK for rides up to 100 km. After that it starts getting a little uncomfortable.
    > Probably because my back is getting tired and not holding me up the same way as when starting
    > out. I could probably live with it, it just annoys me that I cannot set the tilt exactly where I
    > want it.

    Well, you can get seatposts with very closely spaced notches, and there are some that have no
    notches at all. If you want to modify your existing seatpost, you may have to get creative; I've
    never heard of anyone doing so before.

    I don't know where you are, but in Vancouver I've managed to find micro-adjusting seatposts used for
    less than 15$.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    On a paper submitted by a physicist colleague: "This isn't right. This isn't even wrong." --
    Wolfgang Pauli
     
  8. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

  9. Your best bet is to get a TRUE microadjust seatpost. It will have two screws on it.

    On some models you have to loosten one and tighten the other to adjust the saddle tilt. On the
    better (IMHO) designs, however, one screw clamps the saddle, the other adjusts the tilt.

    The SunTour XT was like this. It was nice because you could adjust the tilt without loostening the
    saddle, possibly changing your fore-aft position in the process.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  10. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> writes:

    >I've been trying to get my saddle level for some time and it seems that no matter how I fasten it,
    >it will either point slightly up or slightly down. Are there any tricks I can use to get it to
    >stick inbetween two notches, or reposition the notches?

    Get a Campy Record seatpost.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  11. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    Since everybody's pitching in ... how about the Salsa Shaft? Ingenious head design, methinks.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  12. Ed Chait

    Ed Chait Guest

    Instead of buying a new seatpost, you could just grind the notches off either the base of the post,
    or the loose piece. You only have to do it on one or the other.

    I've performed this minor surgery on a couple of seatposts, and it's worked out fine. They don't
    slip and are infinitely adjustable.

    Ed Chait
     
  13. Mike Hejl

    Mike Hejl Guest

    Ed Chait <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Instead of buying a new seatpost, you could just grind the notches off either the base of the
    > post, or the loose piece. You only have to do it on one or the other.

    Also try rotating the top notched cap (what do you call this?) 180 degrees. I know my Chorus Ti
    seatpost has a slightly different tilt depending on which way the top cap is rotated.
     
  14. [email protected] wrote:
    > Ed Chait <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Instead of buying a new seatpost, you could just grind the notches off either the base of the
    >> post, or the loose piece. You only have to do it on one or the other.
    >
    > Also try rotating the top notched cap (what do you call this?) 180 degrees. I know my Chorus Ti
    > seatpost has a slightly different tilt depending on which way the top cap is rotated.

    Now we're talking.
    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  15. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Your best bet is to get a TRUE microadjust seatpost. It will have two screws on it.
    >
    > On some models you have to loosten one and tighten the other to adjust the saddle tilt. On the
    > better (IMHO) designs, however, one screw clamps the saddle, the other adjusts the tilt.
    >
    > The SunTour XT was like this. It was nice because you could adjust the tilt without loostening the
    > saddle, possibly changing your fore-aft position in the process.
    >
    Weyless makes a carbon post similar to that, but its a pain to get to the front bolt.

    Mike
     
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