Lifting weights and Body Fat Percentage

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Pendejo, May 23, 2008.

  1. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    I can't believe how quickly lifting weights has an effect. I've got one of those scales that also measures body fat percentage, and although I'm sure it's not very accurate in absolute terms, it is useful to track changes over time. I was measuring in the 16% range up until about a year ago when tendinitis in my elbow forced me to quit the weights. Since then my percentage has been 17-18%. I once again started lifting two weeks ago and tonight I'm back in the 16's for the first time in over a year (my weight has been the same for many years now).

    I just hope I can continue lifting without my usual injuries appearing: pinched nerve in neck, tendinitis in elbow or wrist, etc.
     
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  2. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    It is not too surprising that your BMI is lower when you are able to weight train. The key to avoiding injuries is to lift using proper form. Serious weight training requires that a mirror be placed in the gym so that you can evaluate your own form. Of course it doesn't hurt to have a couple of sessions with a personal trainer to show you what the proper form is for the exercises that you do.
     
  3. scuppy

    scuppy New Member

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    Tendonitis can be caused by muscle imbalances. For example if the tendonitis you describe is most painful when doing bicep curls and it sort of hurts in the upper wrist, then this may be the case. Doing some extra exercises at the end of your sessions can prevent this issue from flaring up again. I know physio-therapists arent cheap but it could save you from weeks of down time.
     
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