Lightening the weight of my bike?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by umberto, Mar 18, 2004.

  1. umberto

    umberto New Member

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    Hey how you doin? iv had this question for a while, and im sure others will need it too. I have a hardtail that weighs 30 lb(pounds) and i have changed my gooseneck (stem) and bar to very light ones. The stem is a moots titanium and the bar is an easton monkeylite XC E70. My seat post is a regular old thing that i am thinking of changing to a Thompson. I have an old transmission. It is all Shimano Altus 8 speed. If i changed my rear derallier, casset, chain, and shifters all to newer 9 speed stuff, would it help? Any advise would help, thanks in advance.
     
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  2. MidBunchLurker

    MidBunchLurker New Member

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    IMHO at 30lbs I'd be looking at replacing the frame and/or upgrading the wheels
     
  3. Hecubus

    Hecubus New Member

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    You do realize that dropping the weight under about 26 pounds will most likely require an investment of several hundred, possibly overa thousan dollars right? Under 23 lbs will require several thousand dollars. Look at what you have and then decide if its might be worth just getting a whole new bike.
     
  4. umberto

    umberto New Member

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    can u recomend some tips for any other upgrades, or should i really just dump this frame? if i should get a whole new frame, can you give me some good ones under like US $600?
     
  5. Hecubus

    Hecubus New Member

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    What do you have now and are you upgrading just for the sake of upgrading or are you really looking to improve on something?
     
  6. umberto

    umberto New Member

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    I have a K2 hardtail and would really like to have it perform better in climbing
     
  7. Hecubus

    Hecubus New Member

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    If you want to climb better you will improve more by training than by dropping the bikes weight. More important than the weight make sure the geometry is configured right. I'm not saying that droping the weight will not help climbing of course. It would be less weight to push up but in most circumstances a few pounds less only account for a few seconds faster if you were to do one continuous effort all the way through the climb, something that is extremely rare and nearly impossible in many situations since most climbs require intermitent pulls and rests where that adavantage will go down to almost nothing. If your body gives up too soon having a light bike will not help you much. I friend of mine used to ride an old 40 something pound cannondale and would smoke the competition in races because he was simply a good climber. He later bought a super lightweight hardtail and now rides a very light blur but his climbing didn't really improve much at all because he was justa great climber who could do it almost as well on any bike. Anyway, back to the original point. If you want to drop weight the first and easiest place are the tires and tubes. Getting a set of race type tires and tubes could maybe save up to 2 pounds in some circumstances. Cockpit items such as seatposts, saddles, bars and stems can save a significant amount of weight as well. These are the places you should attack first because they are the cheapest to deal with and yield the first most significant improvement. Drivetrain in many occasions can be left for last since the weight difference from the lightest to the most expensive groupsets can be extremely little while the cost of upgrading is by far the highest.
     
  8. chrispopovic

    chrispopovic New Member

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    Every time I go into my local bike shop and bitch about the weight of my bike, my mechanic makes the best recommendation. Eat a salad and lay off the fries. It doesn't cost a thing to lay five pounds off of your frame in just a couple of weeks but as the last reply stated, it can cost thousands to take it off the bike.
     
  9. umberto

    umberto New Member

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    sounds good so far you guys, thanks for all the replies! I think im just going to train on some hills, there is a huge one, really really steep in my area. its a good two miles up, thanks
     
  10. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I will go along with the diet.

    I just lost 70kg and bought a bike, just imagine if I bought it before the diet. Now that would have been a hangover.
     
  11. sugufish

    sugufish New Member

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    How bout changing the fork... you can save a whole 2 lbs there....
     
  12. scottiebaird

    scottiebaird New Member

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    Not sure what sort of forks you have, maybe these can help:
    http://www.total-air.com/

    agreed, best weight saving is in the wheels. the wheels are what you need to get spinning, the lighter they are the less energy you use. I read a figure somewhere once, it was quite surprising that the actual rider bike weight did not make as much difference as wheel weight. Don't beieve me, well imagine you had concrete wheels v's light alloy spoked ones. See what I mean. Also helps your suspension work better as a lighter wheel will respond to spring movement. Almost certainly you will need to adjust any damping settings you had.
    ONly advantage would be in downhill where in wheel weight would actually be an advantage to some degree, except when trying to stop.

    Hope this helps,
    Scott.
     
  13. kleinrider

    kleinrider New Member

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    Spending extra cashola on a GOOD set of wheels will make the biggest difference by far. Of course, you can go crazy with it (as I did back in the mid/late 90's) and it'll cost you.

    The benefit of going crazy is a super lightweight bike though. My MTB is at 20.5 pounds (actually weighs less than my road bike); not bad for a 1995, huh? Of course, I dumped over $5,000 dollars into it. It still has the original XT cranks, so I could go lighter....hhmmmm.
     
  14. sweet_disasters

    sweet_disasters New Member

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    i chose the i don't know option (well actually i do know, but choosing any other option would be a total lie). My department store bike weighs in at a whopping 38lbs!!!! i think it needs to go on a diet...
     
  15. jaz

    jaz New Member

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    I managed to weigh my new bike at a local couriers today as I had to collect a parcel & it weighed a whopping 10.2kg (just over 22lb)
    But as has been said that took a hefty invesment (£2000) to acheive, I think it was worth it though :)
    I definatlly notice the weight difference on hills even compared to my old bike (26lb).
    I'd spend money on lighter wheels if you want to upgrade something as its money well spent.
     
  16. capitalhealth

    capitalhealth New Member

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    Apparently its still the legs that do the work??? The easiest and cheapest way is to drop a couple of kg in body weight....
     
  17. darnok

    darnok New Member

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    That sounds like a steep price to me for a 10.2 kg bike?
     
  18. jaz

    jaz New Member

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    Yes well darnok the weight wasnt the main factor I considered when building the bike.
    I didnt go out to make a super light xc racer, if thats what I wanted I would have bought a few different parts & lost another 1 or 2 kilo's.
    For instance I bought Fox F80RLT forks & could have saved some weight by getting some flexy superlight SIDs (I also tried & dismissed some Pace rigid carbon forks which would have saved over 1kg) but with the forks the performance out weighs the weight imo.
    I could also save some more weight going from my heavey DMR V8 pedals to some little clipless ones but again they arent for me, & its also the same with the brakes I bought as I could have chose some light V's but I settled on the improved performance of Hope mini mono brakes, it was also the same with the saddle as I bought a cheapish (heavy compared to my old Ti railed seat but that was ripped & looked out of place) one as it matched my bikes paint job perfectly.
    This was the decideing factor for me, finding the balance between superlight & performance & I feel I got it right.
    Heres the complete parts list of what I bought so you can see what little comprimises I made & maybe understand why I bought as I did :)
    Also at 22lb to be really honest the bike doesnt feel heavy at all when its being ridden & I can throw it around with little to no effort & I dont feel if it was a kilo or so less I would really feel a major difference.

    Salsa 16" Bandito full Scandium tubed frame
    Yeti grips
    Azonic CF1 carbon fibre riser bars
    Chris King headset
    Carbon fibre spacers
    Thompson 90mm stem
    DMR V8 pedals
    Hope Mono Mini Brakes
    Fox F80RLT forks
    Mavic X717 on Hope XC hubs
    Panaracer Fire XC (steel bead)
    Selle Italia seat
    Easton Carbon fibre seatpost
    XT shifters/Crank/BB/front & rear Deralliers
    Rohloff Nickel plated chain
     
  19. darnok

    darnok New Member

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    Sorry, I was thinking in terms of a road bike. I don't know where 10.2 kg puts you regarding an MTB!
     
  20. jaz

    jaz New Member

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    Haha oh I see yes 22lb for a £2k road bike would be a bit much, but 22lb for a MTB is very light (allthough you can get an MTB down to 19lb with some major comprimises)
     
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