Lighting advice

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by amazinmets73, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. amazinmets73

    amazinmets73 New Member

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    I'm looking for a good lighting setup. I work nights and commute through suburban Baltimore. I'm currently using an ATC Cree XML, but I'd like an additional front light, and I need back lights as well. Also, any advice on clothing that will make you more visible at night?
     
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  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Those ATC's are cheap, why not just buy another one and get a bar extension to put the two on?

    Tail lights are in a constant change, what's bright one day is beaten by another the next day. The best deal is the Cygolite Hotshot if you don't want to spend a lot of money (around $30) but it has a spot like beam to it which doesn't do much for side visibility; the best mid level is probably the Serfas TL60 Shield ($55) or for a bit more the Serfas TL80 ($70); these lights are sort of inbetween a spot and flood beam. The best high level light is the Light & Motion Vis 180 (not the Vis180 Micro); this light is extraordinary bright, during the day on high it appears as a road flare in it's intensity! At night it casts a red beam onto the pavement and close by building walls. The beam is a wide flood like beam And it's very well built, I accidently forgot to close the clip and took off only to hear it hit the pavement at 18 mph...and not a even a scratch! The Vis 180 will cost right at $100. If you want a ultra high end tail light then the DiNotte 300R is probably the best and brightest of all tail lights on the market and will set you back $160.

    The Vis 180 is so bright I really can't see the need to ever want the DiNotte 300R but some people just want the brightest. If money is an issue then either get the HotShot or I prefer the Serfas TL60 due to it's flood beam which would make you more visible from the sides, in other words a person doesn't have to be coming right at you directly from behind to see you.

    All the lights I mentioned are rechargeable via USB port.

    Right now is not a good time to be buying lights because the season is changing to darkness and lights are the top of the dark season of things to buy thus sale prices will be very rare.
     
  3. amazinmets73

    amazinmets73 New Member

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    The ATC's run off a battery, and I'd rather not have to stick two batteries and a bar extension on my bike. I figured I'd use the ATC as my bright light, and possibly have another flashing light to be more visible. A helmet cam is also an option. What's your opinion on these tail lights? http://www.amazon.com/Zonman®-Quality-Bicycle-Wireless-Induction/dp/B00M510BAG/ref=sr_1_49?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=undefined&sr=1-49&keywords=Bike+light http://www.amazon.com/LIFETIME-GUARANTEE-Batteries-Intensity-Multi-Purpose/dp/B00JX96CQA/ref=sr_1_47?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=1409282696&sr=1-47&keywords=Bike+light
     
  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I hate to say this but those lights you posted are low quality lights, but if that's what you want then get them.

    As far as the lights go, now I know more about what you want, there is a huge selection of lights on Amazon that have the batteries contained within the light, I happen to think that Cygolite is probably the leader in that kind of lighting. So see Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dsporting&field-keywords=cygolite&rh=n%3A3375251%2Ck%3Acygolite and pick out something you can afford.

    There are lots of cheap lights out there but with those you'll keep spending money over and over because they simply don't last as long as better ones, so either spend the money now or do over time.
     
  5. amazinmets73

    amazinmets73 New Member

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  6. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    First of all... Ignore @Froze's monolithic-psychotic posts... (Bro, do you even paragraph? [​IMG])


    Lights yeah?

    -Single led units (1 watt, 3 watts, are good indications).

    -A unit with a concentrated or spread beam lens, according to needs.

    -Internal or external battery.

    -Battery with a flat discharge curve (Voltage / time) (Sanyo Eneloop, GP Recyko?)


    @Froze! [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  7. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Ignore the above too, first off no one except this loon paragraphs every sentence. Second; Volnut had nothing to say in regards to helping you with a light...NOTHING!

    Instead of listening to either of us nut jobs, just do some research on the internet and discover what you need that way. Simply type in the search box: "best bicycle tail light" or "best bicycle head light" without the quotes of course, and a lot of sites will pop up with better information than you can find here.
     
  8. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I think they're a little dim for the price with only 200 lumens, Cygolite makes a 500 lumen self contained battery light for that price! see: http://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-Metro-500-USB-Headlight/dp/B00E1NQ3DU/ref=sr_1_25?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1409531259&sr=1-25&keywords=bicycle+headlight I like Light & Motion stuff, they're very well built but that particular light is way over price; I own a couple of different Cygolites and neither have given me any trouble and the one is over 18 years old and was the cheapest light they sold back then and it still works though I don't use it any more due to much brighter LED technology. In headlights I wouldn't buy anything less than 400 lumens and nothing more than 800 for road use; off road, or single track riding, requires far brighter lighting. Anything less than 400 lumens and all you have is a light that can be seen but you can't really see with it adequately, anything more than 800 and it's just overwhelmingly bright for a road bike doing less than 30 mph.
     
  9. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Are you using a smaller font to make your paragraphs seems smaller now? [​IMG]

    It's not just about the Lumens. Some other lights also measure their output in Candela. (Yes, that's a SI unit, it doesn't describe the amount of light in the equivalent of Oklahoma fire flies [​IMG]).


    So let's suppose you have a 600 lumens light with a wide beam and a 400 lumens light with a narrow beam. Which will light up the road in front of you better?

    Also let's suppose you have a 600 lumens light running on 1.2volt rechargables and a 400 lumens light running on 1.5volt alcalines. They might produce just the same amount of light.

    Also when you are using batteries which do not have a flat discharge curve, the batteries will produce a 1.2volt output for the first 10 minutes or something and then the output will start to gradually drop. So you might get 4 hours of function at around 0.7volt which is not that useful. A flat discharge curve battery (like GP Recyko and Sanyo Eneloop) will produce a constant 1.2 - 1.1volt throughout the discharge circle which produce more light. When they go empty though, they go empty fast.

    Also you see many units using 5 and 7 leds. These don't produce too much light to actually see but maybe they are visible. The units that are designed and advertised as lighting solutions so you can actually see usually have a single powerful led (Cree and Nichia are led brands that seem to be used often).


    Brands? Are you trying to spam-trap me @Froze? [​IMG]

    Anyway:


    Front:

    Giant makes some not too expensive front lights with a 1watt or 3watt Cree led. The 1watt is around 40euro but you might pick up one on sale:

    Giant Numen:


    [​IMG]


    Rear:

    Smart seems to make some interesting 1 watt lights, which also have a few additional bright leds. They are often sold under other brand names too. That 1 watt one is around 20 euro.


    [​IMG]


    Another interesting brand is Lezyne. They make some really nice lights in quality housing but they are pricier.


    [​IMG]


    If you are DIY inclined you can also try to build your own lights. [​IMG]

    Another thing is that, if you crash, the lights are often -ejected- from the bike and their fixtures brake. Sometimes it's hard finding replacement fixtures...


    @Froze [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  10. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Are you weird or what. spam trap? smaller fonts? You seriously need to lay off the funny weed.
     
  11. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Never! [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  12. bikeryder35

    bikeryder35 New Member

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    I came across this bike headlight from this small company. Looks like they deal with lighting of all kinds so I thought I would see if their product is legit. I bought one of their bike headlights and it's super bright!

    http://www.cocoweb.com/sport/sport/escalante-led-bicycle-headlight-black.html#.VCTnJildUVQ
     
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