Lipitor Adverse Effects in Los Angeles Times Mag 02/15/04

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Sharon Hope, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. Sharon Hope

    Sharon Hope Guest

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  2. Matt

    Matt Guest

  3. Don Kirkman

    Don Kirkman Guest

    It seems to me I heard somewhere that Sharon Hope wrote in article
    <[email protected]_s51>:

    >Today's Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine has an article on Dr. Jay Cohen, author of Overdose (and
    >who wrote an intro to Dr. Graveline's book Lipitor, Thief of Memory) .

    >The story, OD MD, opens with Lipitor damage.

    >http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/magazine/la-tm-cohen07feb15,1,4129107.story?coll=la-
    >headlines-magazine

    As I read the story, which discusses a number of medications though it happens to start with Lipitor
    and Michael Hope, Cohen's point is *over-medication*, not the effects of statins. He believes
    doctors and pharmaceutical companies don't do enough to adjust dosages to the individual patient,
    and he thinks pharmaceuticals should be available in smaller doses than are currently available.

    A former manager at one company, asked if Cohen is overstating his case, says "'If the problem is
    serious side effects, probably. I think his basic premise is fair. I think he's right that there's a
    big risk to society in the doses they do offer.' A potential risk of Cohen's theory, he says, is
    that if doses are too small to be effective, then patients might stop taking medications."

    [Begin quote from the Times] "In the Nov., 6, 2002, issue of JAMA, a reviewer said, "Jay Cohen, MD,
    long a thorn in the industry's side, has written a highly readable, user-friendly, and well-
    researched account of a serious clinical issue plaguing the everyday practice of medicine. The
    problem is over-medication." [End quote]
    --
    Don [email protected]
     
  4. Sharon Hope

    Sharon Hope Guest

    Exactly, the focus of the story is on Dr. Cohen and Over Dose of the public by unnecessarily high
    doses of prescription medicine.

    Mr Hope's case is the introductory example - Dr. Cohen contends that 10 mg/day of Lipitor IS ***OVER-
    MEDICATION***. He says that 5 mg or even 2.5 mg is far more appropriate.

    Note the extensive damage done to Mr. Hope at 10 mg/day over 4 years - continuing still after 2
    years off Lipitor - and then contemplate Dr. Cohen's observation that adverse effects are largely
    dose-related in the context of people who are now taking Lipitor in 40mg/day prescriptions and
    80mg/day prescriptions.

    Dr. Cohen is trying to correct a flaw in the symptom that causes unnecessarily high dosages to be
    the first to receive FDA approval. His remarks cover the pharmaceutical spectrum.

    It is Mr. Hope's Lipitor-caused disability that is the first example, and some of Dr. Cohen's
    comments are specific to Lipitor's excessively high dosages.

    "Don Kirkman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It seems to me I heard somewhere that Sharon Hope wrote in article
    > <[email protected]_s51>:
    >
    > >Today's Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine has an article on Dr. Jay
    Cohen,
    > >author of Overdose (and who wrote an intro to Dr. Graveline's book
    Lipitor,
    > >Thief of Memory) .
    >
    > >The story, OD MD, opens with Lipitor damage.
    >
    >
    >http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/magazine/la-tm-cohen07feb15,1,
    4129107.story?coll=la-headlines-magazine
    >
    > As I read the story, which discusses a number of medications though it happens to start with
    > Lipitor and Michael Hope, Cohen's point is *over-medication*, not the effects of statins. He
    > believes doctors and pharmaceutical companies don't do enough to adjust dosages to the individual
    > patient, and he thinks pharmaceuticals should be available in smaller doses than are currently
    > available.
    >
    > A former manager at one company, asked if Cohen is overstating his case, says "'If the problem is
    > serious side effects, probably. I think his basic premise is fair. I think he's right that there's
    > a big risk to society in the doses they do offer.' A potential risk of Cohen's theory, he says, is
    > that if doses are too small to be effective, then patients might stop taking medications."
    >
    > [Begin quote from the Times] "In the Nov., 6, 2002, issue of JAMA, a reviewer said, "Jay Cohen,
    > MD, long a thorn in the industry's side, has written a highly readable, user-friendly, and well-
    > researched account of a serious clinical issue plaguing the everyday practice of medicine. The
    > problem is over-medication." [End quote]
    > --
    > Don [email protected]
     
  5. Don Kirkman

    Don Kirkman Guest

    It seems to me I heard somewhere that Sharon Hope wrote in article
    <[email protected]_s52>:

    >Exactly, the focus of the story is on Dr. Cohen and Over Dose of the public by unnecessarily high
    >doses of prescription medicine.

    >Mr Hope's case is the introductory example - Dr. Cohen contends that 10 mg/day of Lipitor IS ***OVER-
    >MEDICATION***. He says that 5 mg or even 2.5 mg is far more appropriate.

    >Note the extensive damage done to Mr. Hope at 10 mg/day over 4 years - continuing still after 2
    >years off Lipitor - and then contemplate Dr. Cohen's observation that adverse effects are largely
    >dose-related in the context of people who are now taking Lipitor in 40mg/day prescriptions and
    >80mg/day prescriptions.

    >Dr. Cohen is trying to correct a flaw in the symptom that causes unnecessarily high dosages to be
    > the first to receive FDA approval. His remarks cover the pharmaceutical spectrum.

    >It is Mr. Hope's Lipitor-caused disability that is the first example, and some of Dr. Cohen's
    >comments are specific to Lipitor's excessively high dosages.

    Precisely, just as I also wrote. Not about statins and statin damage at all, but about doctors not
    individualizing dosages and about companies not making medications is small enough doses.

    >"Don Kirkman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> It seems to me I heard somewhere that Sharon Hope wrote in article
    >> <[email protected]_s51>:

    >> >Today's Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine has an article on Dr. Jay
    >Cohen,
    >> >author of Overdose (and who wrote an intro to Dr. Graveline's book
    >Lipitor,
    >> >Thief of Memory) .

    >> >The story, OD MD, opens with Lipitor damage.

    From overdose, in Cohen's opinion.

    >>http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/magazine/la-tm-cohen07feb15,1,
    >4129107.story?coll=la-headlines-magazine

    >> As I read the story, which discusses a number of medications though it happens to start with
    >> Lipitor and Michael Hope, Cohen's point is *over-medication*, not the effects of statins. He
    >> believes doctors and pharmaceutical companies don't do enough to adjust dosages to the individual
    >> patient, and he thinks pharmaceuticals should be available in smaller doses than are currently
    >> available.

    >> A former manager at one company, asked if Cohen is overstating his case, says "'If the problem is
    >> serious side effects, probably. I think his basic premise is fair. I think he's right that
    >> there's a big risk to society in the doses they do offer.' A potential risk of Cohen's theory, he
    >> says, is that if doses are too small to be effective, then patients might stop taking
    >> medications."
    >>
    >> [Begin quote from the Times] "In the Nov., 6, 2002, issue of JAMA, a reviewer said, "Jay Cohen,
    >> MD, long a thorn in the industry's side, has written a highly readable, user-friendly, and well-
    >> researched account of a serious clinical issue plaguing the everyday practice of medicine. The
    >> problem is over-medication." [End quote]
    --
    Don [email protected]
     
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