List of Rohloff specific frames sold in US



S

Sledge Hammer

Guest
I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
the ones generally available). Even mainstream US companies seem not
to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.

All guidance is greatly appreciated.

Dave
 
W

wizardB

Guest
Sledge Hammer wrote:
> I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
> with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
> the ones generally available). Even mainstream US companies seem not
> to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.
>
> All guidance is greatly appreciated.
>
> Dave

Dekerf build almost all there frame with the Rohloff option cable tabs etc.
 
P

(PeteCresswell)

Guest
Per Sledge Hammer:
> Even mainstream US companies seem not
>to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.
>
>All guidance is greatly appreciated.


I have 2 Rohloff hubs that have been used on a total of 5 bikes:
3 FS' and 2 hard tails.

The two hard tails are "Rohloff-specific" in the sense that one
has a chain tensioner in the rear dropouts and the other has an
eccentric BB shell to tension the chain.

FWIW, chain tensioning is the only "Rohloff-specific" feature
that I can think of that makes any sense.

It could even be seen as a minor disadvantage in that it locks
one into not using a der system (assuming the frame was made
without a der hanger).

It's kind of nice to not to have a chain tensioner add-on... but
it's definitely not a religious issue with me.
--
PeteCresswell
 
L

landotter

Guest
On May 18, 10:12 am, Sledge Hammer <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
> with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
> the ones generally available). Even mainstream US companies seem not
> to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.
>
> All guidance is greatly appreciated.
>

Don't have a list, but Mike Ant sure makes some fun custom Rohloff
frames:

http://www.antbikemike.com/rohloff.html
 
A

Andre Jute

Guest
On May 18, 4:12 pm, Sledge Hammer <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
> with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
> the ones generally available).  Even mainstream US companies seem not
> to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.
>
> All guidance is greatly appreciated.
>
> Dave


I can't help you with a list, but whether you need a Rohloff specific
frame depends on what kind of brakes you want to fit. The critical
question with Rohloff is how you will achieve chain tension and that
in turn determines what sort of a frame you need.

If you're going to use rim brakes of any kind, all you need to fit a
Rohloff hub is a bike with track ends and the right rear frame
spacing. Be nice if there were space for a couple of chain tugs but
basically you just pull the hub back in the track ends until the chain
is tight and bolt it up tightly.

If you want disc brakes, you must have some kind of sliding or
otherwise adjustable axle mount with the caliper bolt ears on the
sliding piece in the right relation to the axle hole; to tension the
chain you then slide the whole assembly back in the slot and, you
guessed it, bolt it up tightly.

Two alternatives, available with just about any old dropout, is to
have an eccentric bottom bracket, or to use Rohloff's own chain
tensioner on bikes with derailleur bits.

HTH.

Andre Jute
http://members.lycos.co.uk/fiultra/BICYCLE HUMOUR.html
 
A

Andre Jute

Guest
On May 18, 9:57 pm, Andre Jute <[email protected]> wrote:
> On May 18, 4:12 pm, Sledge Hammer <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
> > with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
> > the ones generally available).  Even mainstream US companies seem not
> > to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.

>
> > All guidance is greatly appreciated.

>
> > Dave

>
> I can't help you with a list, but whether you need a Rohloff specific
> frame depends on what kind of brakes you want to fit. The critical
> question with Rohloff is how you will achieve chain tension and that
> in turn determines what sort of a frame you need.
>
> If you're going to use rim brakes of any kind, all you need to fit a
> Rohloff hub is a bike with track ends and the right rear frame
> spacing. Be nice if there were space for a couple of chain tugs but
> basically you just pull the hub back in the track ends until the chain
> is tight and bolt it up tightly.
>
> If you want disc brakes, you must have some kind of sliding or
> otherwise adjustable axle mount with the caliper bolt ears on the
> sliding piece in the right relation to the axle hole; to tension the
> chain you then slide the whole assembly back in the slot and, you
> guessed it, bolt it up tightly.
>
> Two alternatives, available with just about any old dropout, is to
> have an eccentric bottom bracket, or to use Rohloff's own chain
> tensioner on bikes with derailleur bits.
>
> HTH.
>
> Andre Jute
>  http://members.lycos.co.uk/fiultra/BICYCLE HUMOUR.html


Further to the above types of possible mounting schemes for the
Rohloff hub, be sure you understand before you order which of the
Rohloff models which your frame and which accessories you need. Some
need the tensioner, some need a torque reaction arm, some need one
kind of cable input dingus, another has a different cable routing and
cable input thingy. On the Rohloff site there is a logical progression
of multiple choices to help you through this, with illustrations to
help you understand what they're talking about.

HTHSM.

Andre Jute
Visit Jute on Amps at http://members.lycos.co.uk/fiultra/
"wonderfully well written and reasoned information
for the tube audio constructor"
John Broskie TubeCAD & GlassWare
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containing vital gems of wisdom"
Stuart Perry Hi-Fi News & Record Review
 
On May 18, 11:12 pm, Sledge Hammer <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
> with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
> the ones generally available). Even mainstream US companies seem not
> to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.
>
> All guidance is greatly appreciated.
>
> Dave


You may want to check the Tout Terrain frames and built-up bicycles at
www.peterwhitecycles.com
 
On May 18, 11:12 pm, Sledge Hammer <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
> with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
> the ones generally available). Even mainstream US companies seem not
> to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.
>
> All guidance is greatly appreciated.
>
> Dave


You may want to check the Tout Terrain frames and built-up bicycles at
www.peterwhitecycles.com
 
B

BobT

Guest
"Sledge Hammer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
>I was hoping someone had a list of companies selling production frames
> with Rohloff-specific hardware in the US (or at least a good idea of
> the ones generally available). Even mainstream US companies seem not
> to sell their European Rohloff models domestically.
>
> All guidance is greatly appreciated.
>
> Dave


You need to be more specific about what you mean by Rohloff-specific
hardware. To use a Rohloff hub a frame needs these features:

1. A way to fit a 135 mm wide hub
2. Appropriate chain line (not really a feature of the frame as this is
adjusted with the bottom bracket / crankset combination)
3. A way to adjust the chain tension which can be:
a. spring chain tensioner like on a derailluer bike, Rohloff supplies
one that attaches to a standard derailluer hanger
b. eccentric bottom bracket
c. sliding rear dropouts
d. horizontal dropouts like a track bike but this setup works best with
nutted axles and perhaps not at all with a quick release skewer.
4. A way to counteract the torque produced by the hub which can be:
a. Rohloff specific dropouts
b. A clamp-on torque arm from Rohloff that will fit most bikes
c. A "dog-bone" attachment from Rohloff that bolts on to a disk brake
mounting boss on the frame

You can take almost any frame that will fit a 135 mm rear hub and use a
Rohloff chain tensioner and Rohloff torque arm and use a Rohloff hub. If
you want Rohloff specific sliding rear dropouts (so you won't need a chain
tensioner or torque arm or dog-bone attachment to disk brake mounts), I
don't think you will find this in a "production" frame anywhere, especially
in the U.S.A. It is readily available from many USA or other custom frame
builders. Bob Jackson cycles in Leeds, UK made my touring bike frame like
this for roughly the same price as a Rohloff hub.

BobT
 
C

Chalo

Guest
PeteCresswell wrote:
>
> FWIW, chain tensioning is the only "Rohloff-specific" feature
> that I can think of that makes any sense.


Deep-slotted "OEM" dropouts that allow you to avoid the torque arm or
Dogbone are pretty nice. I'd definitely recommend that arrangement.
Rear-opening dropouts with a deep enough slot could probably be used
in the same way.

Chalo
 
S

Sledge Hammer

Guest
On May 18, 9:13 pm, "BobT" <[email protected]>
wrote:
responding to me, "Sledge Hammer" <[email protected]> wrote in
message
>
> You need to be more specific about what you mean by Rohloff-specific
> hardware. To use a Rohloff hub a frame needs these features:

[***]
> You can take almost any frame that will fit a 135 mm rear hub and use a
> Rohloff chain tensioner and Rohloff torque arm and use a Rohloff hub.


Thank you all for the responses. I probably should have just said
frames allowing fitting of a quick release version without a chain
tensioner, ie, I think, a bike with either the sliding dropouts or an
eccentric bottom bracket. Bike shops in my area (central
Pennsylvania) don't stock bikes with gearhubs of any type, so I'm
trying to do due diligence. I'm guessing that I'm going to have to
do something along the lines of Harris's San Jos8 (a friend has a
Raleigh One-Way he'd give me a deal on), but with flat bars, or a
custom bike with a Rohloff hub.

I'm replacing a late, lamented mountain bike that was stolen from
storage in my apartment building. It was a mid-90s steel Specialized
21-speed with no suspension and 1" slicks; it ended up looking like a
hybrid. It was a great bike that stood up to a lot. I don't know if
anyone makes a cheap, simple, durable bike like that anymore--it looks
like almost all entry-level production mountain bikes are aluminum and
have a suspension fork.
 
D

Drew Saunders

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
Sledge Hammer <[email protected]> wrote:

> I'm replacing a late, lamented mountain bike that was stolen from
> storage in my apartment building. It was a mid-90s steel Specialized
> 21-speed with no suspension and 1" slicks; it ended up looking like a
> hybrid. It was a great bike that stood up to a lot. I don't know if
> anyone makes a cheap, simple, durable bike like that anymore--it looks
> like almost all entry-level production mountain bikes are aluminum and
> have a suspension fork.


There are plenty options that are much cheaper than a Rohloff bike
should you be looking for a planetary hub, fenders, etc in a sensible
commuter. Heck, most are much cheaper than just the Rohloff hub!

Such as the REI Fusion:

http://www.rei.com/product/744803

A couple versions of the Bianchi Milano:

http://www.bianchiusa.com/08_milano_alfine.html
http://www.bianchiusa.com/08_milano_parco.html

Joe Breeze seems to be all about these kind of bikes now:

http://www.breezerbikes.com/index.cfm?CFID=32051900&CFTOKEN=33944621

On to the original topic, my "win the lottery" MTB would be a Moots YBB
with Rohloff option. http://www.moots.com/?#/product/bicycles/mtb/ybb/
http://www.moots.com/?#/product/custom_options/rohloff_option/

Drew

--
Drew W. Saunders

dru (at) stanford (dot) eee dee you