Littering ==) Picking up garbage

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by ..., Aug 10, 2003.

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  1. ...

    ... Guest

    I cross posted this to several outdoor groups because I believe the information concerns us
    all outdoorsmen and women (and I wanted to reach the maximum audience). Please read on and
    spread the word.

    Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of garbage collected so far. The vast majority is pop
    cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer) bottles, and packs of cigarettes. I bring it back,
    recycle or dump it.

    Simply put I think people who litter, ever, in any capacity, have some serious moral deficiencies.
    Who the hell is lazy and selfish enough to throw trash out the window instead of waiting for home?
    Serious loosers IMO. I started discussing this with my neighbours (who agree, some already pick up
    garbage themselves) and went to the provincial police about it (who said they will come up and asked
    me to complain to the municipality).

    If you have any friend or know anyone who does this and thinks it's cool or okay, please do everyone
    a favour and smack some sense into them. And if you ever see garbage on the trail (or anywhere) and
    pick it up, I thank you, many people like me thank you and the earth thanks you.

    Cheers.

    Fabien
     
    Tags:


  2. Mrslanteye

    Mrslanteye Guest

    ... wrote:
    > I cross posted this to several outdoor groups because I believe the information concerns us all
    > outdoorsmen and women (and I wanted to reach the maximum audience). Please read on and spread
    > the word.
    >
    > Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    > start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of garbage collected so far. The vast majority is pop
    > cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer)

    Sounds like the typical hiker.

    -MSE
     
  3. On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 22:02:49 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    >> start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of garbage collected so far. The vast majority is
    >> pop cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer)
    >
    >Sounds like the typical hiker.
    >
    >-MSE

    That's a bad thing? Picking up trash?
     
  4. User0

    User0 Guest

    On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 22:02:49 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:

    >... wrote:
    >> I cross posted this to several outdoor groups because I believe the information concerns us all
    >> outdoorsmen and women (and I wanted to reach the maximum audience). Please read on and spread
    >> the word.
    >>
    >> Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    >> start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of garbage collected so far. The vast majority is
    >> pop cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer)
    >
    >Sounds like the typical hiker.
    >
    >-MSE

    Sounds like the typical idiot that gives MTB'ers a bad name.
     
  5. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    user0 wrote:
    > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 22:02:49 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>... wrote:
    >>
    >>>I cross posted this to several outdoor groups because I believe the information concerns us all
    >>>outdoorsmen and women (and I wanted to reach the maximum audience). Please read on and spread
    >>>the word.
    >>>
    >>>Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    >>>start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of garbage collected so far. The vast majority is
    >>>pop cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer)
    >>
    >>Sounds like the typical hiker.
    >>
    >>-MSE
    >
    >
    > Sounds like the typical idiot that gives MTB'ers a bad name.
    >
    >
    >

    Maybe I'm not reading this the same way that you are, but my experience is that most family hikers
    leave a trail <sigh>. When I was a Scoutmaster, that was one of my challenges with the new boys --
    getting across: leave no sign that were there.

    David
     
  6. "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 22:02:49 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >> Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on
    the
    > >> trails. I decided to start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of
    garbage
    > >> collected so far. The vast majority is pop cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer)
    > >
    > >Sounds like the typical hiker.
    > >
    > >-MSE
    >
    >
    > That's a bad thing? Picking up trash?

    Duh. NO. The hikers brought it IN.
     
  7. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    user0 wrote:
    > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 22:02:49 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>... wrote:
    >>
    >>>I cross posted this to several outdoor groups because I believe the information concerns us all
    >>>outdoorsmen and women (and I wanted to reach the maximum audience). Please read on and spread
    >>>the word.
    >>>
    >>>Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    >>>start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of garbage collected so far. The vast majority is
    >>>pop cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer)
    >>
    >>Sounds like the typical hiker.
    >>
    >>-MSE
    >
    >
    > Sounds like the typical idiot that gives MTB'ers a bad name.
    >
    >

    Maybe I'm not reading this the same way that you are, but my experience is that most family hikers
    leave a trail <sigh>. When I was a Scoutmaster, that was one of my challenges with the new boys --
    getting across: leave no sign that you were there.

    David
     
  8. Brian

    Brian Guest

    "Desert Traveler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <[email protected]>
    wrote
    > in message news:[email protected]...
    > > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 22:02:49 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >> Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage
    on
    > the
    > > >> trails. I decided to start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of
    > garbage
    > > >> collected so far. The vast majority is pop cans, plastic bottles,
    glass
    > > >> (including beer)
    > > >
    > > >Sounds like the typical hiker.
    > > >
    > > >-MSE
    > >
    > >
    > > That's a bad thing? Picking up trash?
    >
    > Duh. NO. The hikers brought it IN.

    Where I live here in Southern California, I am just off a portion of the Pacific Crest Trail. This
    being the case, I wind up with numerous hikers knocking at my door for various things such as water,
    phone use, and remarkably.....directions. Most of them are very nice people and I've had some very
    enjoyable conversations. I will say, however, that every year, the road from the trail to my place
    is invariably littered with trash such as empty soda/water bottles, food/snack wrappers, old
    clothing, etc. Now....it isn't heavily littered, but its littered nonetheless.....and during the
    hiking season is the only time it happens. So I know where its comin' from. Certainly, not all the
    hikers are tossing in their contribution to the mess......just a very few of them. And...every year
    I go out with my ATV and trailer, pick it all up, and feed it to the dumpster.

    So I guess my point is that no group, be they hikers, mountain bike riders, horse riders, ATV or
    other OHV riders, has risen to any sort of lofty status over the rest of us. There will always be
    bad apples which make us all look bad. So, I've resigned myself to this yearly cleanup. No big deal.

    Brian
     
  9. Bob La Londe

    Bob La Londe Guest

    When I was a kid my dad always had us pick up a little more than we brought. If enough of us did
    that there woudl be very little trash anywhere on our trails and waterways.

    "..." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I cross posted this to several outdoor groups because I believe the information concerns us all
    > outdoorsmen and women (and I wanted to reach
    the
    > maximum audience). Please read on and spread the word.
    >
    > Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    > start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of
    garbage
    > collected so far. The vast majority is pop cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer) bottles,
    > and packs of cigarettes. I bring it back,
    recycle
    > or dump it.
    >
    > Simply put I think people who litter, ever, in any capacity, have some serious moral deficiencies.
    > Who the hell is lazy and selfish enough to
    throw
    > trash out the window instead of waiting for home? Serious loosers IMO. I started discussing this
    > with my neighbours (who agree, some already pick
    up
    > garbage themselves) and went to the provincial police about it (who said they will come up and
    > asked me to complain to the municipality).
    >
    > If you have any friend or know anyone who does this and thinks it's cool
    or
    > okay, please do everyone a favour and smack some sense into them. And if
    you
    > ever see garbage on the trail (or anywhere) and pick it up, I thank you, many people like me thank
    > you and the earth thanks you.
    >
    > Cheers.
    >
    > Fabien
     
  10. Bob La Londe wrote:
    >
    > When I was a kid my dad always had us pick up a little more than we brought. If enough of us did
    > that there woudl be very little trash anywhere on our

    Hi,

    I was taught the same, and we taught the Boy Scouts in my brother's troop to do it as well (they had
    a backpacking oriented troop.) At first the kids would whine about it--"I didn't bring that trash
    in, why should I have to pick it up?"--but after a few trips it became a habit, then a "badge of
    honor" that the campsites were spotless when our guys got done with them.

    I still police up any campsite (and usually the trail, too) before leaving, and insist anyone with
    me helps. I just hope our Scouts are teaching their kids the same lesson.

    Rick
     
  11. Mrslanteye

    Mrslanteye Guest

    B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:
    > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 22:02:49 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Shortly after I bought the cottage, I started noticing much garbage on the trails. I decided to
    >>>start picking it up. I am up to 19 bags full of garbage collected so far. The vast majority is
    >>>pop cans, plastic bottles, glass (including beer)
    >>
    >>Sounds like the typical hiker.
    >>
    >>-MSE
    >
    >
    >
    > That's a bad thing? Picking up trash?

    No, picking up after hikers is a good thing. It's a shame that hikers leave their refuse behind.

    -MSE
     
  12. On Mon, 11 Aug 2003, MrSlantEye wrote:

    > No, picking up after hikers is a good thing. It's a shame that hikers leave their refuse behind.

    That's another reason I like scrambles. In the past year I have found two pieces of trash once we
    got past 7,000 feet. A very rusty tin can last year, and small piece of plastic a week ago.

    Cheers, Lech
     
  13. Karl Pollak

    Karl Pollak Guest

    x-no-archive: yes Rick Courtright <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I still police up any campsite (and usually the trail, too) before leaving, and insist anyone with
    >me helps. I just hope our Scouts are teaching their kids the same lesson.

    I don't know about your Scouts, but _my_ Sea Scouts do a "river clean up" every year. We spend a day
    on the water usually in Steveston harbour and it is a rare time when we go home with fewer than 4 or
    5 big garbage bags full of stuff. Some goes into recycling, most into land fill.

    We have never had any kid complain about our clean up day. They get to paddle about the harbour all
    day, we usually have a picnic on Steveston Island, they all get a turn to drive the Zodiac, and they
    do some good. Not much, but some. The point of the exercise is not really to clean up the harbour,
    because you'd need at least a regiment to do that, but to give them the idea that they should take
    care of the place they live in or visit and to get into the "leave no trace" habit. Similarly, the
    rule on all our camps is to leave the place cleaner than how we found it.

    When the kids see for themselves the accumulation of the garbage over a few months, they get to
    appreciate that it is not "it's just a gum wrapper, don't make a federal case out of it".

    --
    Greetings from Lotusland
     
  14. Live Oak

    Live Oak Guest

    Rick Courtright <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Bob La Londe wrote:
    > >
    > > When I was a kid my dad always had us pick up a little more than we brought. If enough of us did
    > > that there woudl be very little trash anywhere on our
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I was taught the same, and we taught the Boy Scouts in my brother's troop to do it as well (they
    > had a backpacking oriented troop.) At first the kids would whine about it--"I didn't bring that
    > trash in, why should I have to pick it up?"--but after a few trips it became a habit, then a
    > "badge of honor" that the campsites were spotless when our guys got done with them.
    >
    > I still police up any campsite (and usually the trail, too) before leaving, and insist anyone with
    > me helps. I just hope our Scouts are teaching their kids the same lesson.
    >
    > Rick

    That's what I'm teaching to my child and it's what I was taught. Leave it cleaner than you found it.

    But there's no lack of trashy people in this world so it seems it's always an uphill battle.

    ={oak}-
     
  15. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Live Oak wrote:
    > Rick Courtright <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>Bob La Londe wrote:
    >>
    >>>When I was a kid my dad always had us pick up a little more than we brought. If enough of us did
    >>>that there woudl be very little trash anywhere on our
    >>
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>I was taught the same, and we taught the Boy Scouts in my brother's troop to do it as well (they
    >>had a backpacking oriented troop.) At first the kids would whine about it--"I didn't bring that
    >>trash in, why should I have to pick it up?"--but after a few trips it became a habit, then a
    >>"badge of honor" that the campsites were spotless when our guys got done with them.
    >>
    >>I still police up any campsite (and usually the trail, too) before leaving, and insist anyone with
    >>me helps. I just hope our Scouts are teaching their kids the same lesson.
    >>
    >>Rick
    >
    >
    > That's what I'm teaching to my child and it's what I was taught. Leave it cleaner than you
    > found it.
    >
    > But there's no lack of trashy people in this world so it seems it's always an uphill battle.
    >
    > ={oak}-

    I once told some people with me that they'd have to find their own way home if they didn't go get
    the stuff that they threw behind some bushes. They were really mad and didn't understand. They
    basically thought that I was some kind of an enviro-nut <sigh>.

    David
     
  16. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    > But there's no lack of trashy people in this world so it seems it's always an uphill battle.
    >
    > ={oak}-

    I think MOST campers/hikers are the thoughtful type who do at least their share of picking up, if
    not more as in the case of those of us who leave a place cleaner than when we entered. If the
    majority of people dumped trash, we wouldn't be able to see the woods for the mountains of trash. It
    only takes a few slobs to color our perception of the rest the world. Reality says it is up to us to
    make up the slack. Laura
     
  17. David Wood

    David Wood Guest

    I've never littered and consider those who do disposable sociopaths, but I consider picking up
    someone else's trash an enabling activity so I can't bring myself to do it. Get rid of the
    litterbugs, not the litter.

    I applaud those who teach others not to litter but can't help thinking that picking up someone's
    trash teaches them that it's okay to litter since no negative consequence accrues. This point is
    bolstered by the postings of those who cleaned up trash on private land. People of low character
    always leave a bigger mess when they perceive there's a maid service.

    Practically, the deposit fees are effective as far as they go but lot's of litter doesn't fit the
    criteria so I favor super heavy penalties for littering. $5,000 - $10,000 plus 6 - 12 months
    full-time trash detail in the jurisdiction of the offense for willful littering. Lesser penalties
    for negligent littering (blown out of truck bed, etc.).
     
  18. On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 14:47:05 -0700, MrSlantEye <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> That's a bad thing? Picking up trash?
    >
    >No, picking up after hikers is a good thing. It's a shame that hikers leave their refuse behind.

    Hey, here's a really cool experiment for you. Hike the 60 mile section of the Florida Trail through
    the Ocala National Forest. Notice where you find trash. You too will become incredibly good at
    predicting the future: "Hey, I see trash. I bet there's a dirt road coming up".

    --------------
    Steve Silberberg mailto:[email protected] Read "We'll Kiss For Food"
    http://www.kissforfood.com/
     
  19. Greg Moore

    Greg Moore Guest

    I picked up one guys litter once, every bit of it and it was a full green garbage bags worth..

    That was of course after he tossed it out his car window on a side road. I was some distance behind
    him, I stayed some distance back and found what house/cottage he pulled into.. The next morning I am
    certain he was thrilled when he woke up to find all that trash on his lawn. The worst part is, I
    didn't even have to follow him, there were papers in the garbage with his address and name on them,
    how stupid are some people??

    Unfortunately my wife and I both smoke, but even our butts don't see Lake Huron, they come back with
    us in an empty.

    "David Wood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've never littered and consider those who do disposable sociopaths, but I consider picking up
    > someone else's trash an enabling activity so I can't bring myself to do it. Get rid of the
    > litterbugs, not the litter.
    >
    > I applaud those who teach others not to litter but can't help thinking that picking up someone's
    > trash teaches them that it's okay to litter since no negative consequence accrues. This point is
    > bolstered by the postings of those who cleaned up trash on private land. People of low character
    > always leave a bigger mess when they perceive there's a maid service.
    >
    > Practically, the deposit fees are effective as far as they go but lot's of litter doesn't fit the
    > criteria so I favor super heavy penalties for littering. $5,000 - $10,000 plus 6 - 12 months
    > full-time trash detail in the jurisdiction of the offense for willful littering. Lesser penalties
    > for negligent littering (blown out of truck bed, etc.).
     
  20. Frank Looper

    Frank Looper Guest

    "Karl Pollak" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I don't know about your Scouts, but _my_ Sea Scouts do a "river clean up" every year. We spend a
    > day on the water usually in Steveston harbour and it is a rare time when we go home with fewer
    > than 4 or 5 big garbage bags full of stuff. Some goes into recycling, most into land fill.
    >
    I'm taking a youth group to a primitive campsite in a national forest, and when I scouted it out,
    I decided that the first group activity will be a group policing of the entire campground. We'll
    talk about stewardship and God-Art first, and I'll almost guarantee that they'll not only not
    mind (most of them), they'll pick up trash on every hike they go on in the future. Don't most of
    you carry a small bag for picking up trash on every hike? We can all make a difference, one hiker
    at a time.

    Peace, Frank
     
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