local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers



T

T2_lurking

Guest
Fire Dept? One that has a EMT crew.
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t2_lurking geabbottATabbottandabbottDOTcom Do not mail to t2_lurking (auto-delete)
============================
Well, i dreamed i saw the silver Space ships flying In the yellow haze of the sun -- Neil Young --
====================
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====================================================
"Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> suggestions?
> --
> http://homepage.mac.com/mkatzman/
 
C

Charly Coughran

Guest
Marshall <[email protected]> wrote in news:NqcXb.18852$M8.10607
@nwrdny02.gnilink.net:

> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> suggestions?

It is difficult for any of us to advise, because the regulations concerning the disposal of syringes
by individuals vary by location, usually county and we don't know where you are. The hospital is
probably reluctant to accept them because as soon as they are on hospital property they are
offically 'commercial medical waste' and a whole set of regulations apply. They do not recycle the
sharps, but must pay for their safe disposal.

In San Diego where I live, I am asked to put them in a stout plastic bottle, such as a bleach
or liquid laundry soap bottle, and put them in the regular trash. Sharps containers are
discouraged because it freaks the trash guys out, they think hospital waste has made it into
the residential stream.

You need to determine the local rules for where you are. Try your doctor's office, diabetes
educator, the pharmacy(?) where you obtained your container, your local ADA office, or your local
trash disposal manager.
 
B

Beav

Guest
"Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> suggestions?

Shove 'em in the bin. If you're REALLY picky about these things, shove 'em in an empty tin and THEN
shove 'em in the bin.

It's what I've done for 16 years

Beav
 
E

Elizabeth Blake

Guest
"Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> suggestions?

In NYC, you're supposed to put them in a leakproof, puncture proof container, seal it up & label it
and put it in the regular trash. I use the commercial sharps containers. I reuse pen needles &
syringes so it takes me awhile to fill one up. I do always wrap it in a bag before putting it in the
trash bag. I know that some of the service staff where I live wouldn't be too happy seeing it, even
if it is sealed. A couple of years ago they sent letters around asking people to not just throw
insulin syringes into the trash, as one of the service staff got poked.

Sometimes I have to change my pen needle at work. I put the little inner cap back on, and the bigger
outer cap from a new needle over that. Then I tape it all up with heavy tape, put it in an envelope,
fold that up and tape it. I get paranoid that someone might get hurt.

Liz
 
T

T2_lurking

Guest
Com'on Beav he's trying to do the right thing. I just put 'em in a soda can. I know there has...has
to be worse things in the trash.
--

t2_lurking geabbottATabbottandabbottDOTcom Do not mail to t2_lurking (auto-delete)
============================
Well, i dreamed i saw the silver Space ships flying In the yellow haze of the sun -- Neil Young --
====================
New to Diabetes? Go to: http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org
====================================================
"Beav" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
glfd.server.ntli.net...
>
> "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> > suggestions?
>
> Shove 'em in the bin. If you're REALLY picky about these things, shove 'em in an empty tin and
> THEN shove 'em in the bin.
>
> It's what I've done for 16 years
>
> Beav
 
M

Mike Gray

Guest
Beav wrote:

> "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
>> suggestions?
>
> Shove 'em in the bin. If you're REALLY picky about these things, shove 'em in an empty tin and
> THEN shove 'em in the bin.
>
> It's what I've done for 16 years

Aren't you worried that the rats at the dump may accidently stick themselves and catch diabetes?
Then multiply and invade the town you live in, biting children in their sleep? Spreading diabetes to
every corner of the shire, destroying social order, creating havoc, and toppling the crown? Easing
an invasion of godless heathens from the east who will slaughter yer parents and rape yer daughters?

Here in the US we just save them up 'til October and give em to the kids at Halloween.
 
A

Alan Mackenzie

Guest
Beav <[email protected]> wrote on Sat, 14 Feb 2004 00:01:47
-0000:

> "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
>> suggestions?

> Shove 'em in the bin. If you're REALLY picky about these things, shove 'em in an empty tin and
> THEN shove 'em in the bin.

> It's what I've done for 16 years

Same here (except it's more like 40 years). Nowadays all the syringes and needles I use have a
plastic cover which clips firmly onto them, or (in the case of pen needles) snugly embraces them.
They're difficult to remove by accident.

> Beav

--
Alan Mackenzie (Munich, Germany) Email: [email protected]; to decode, wherever there is a repeated
letter (like "aa"), remove half of them (leaving, say, "a").
 
M

Mack

Guest
On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 22:43:57 GMT, Marshall <[email protected]>
wrote:

>My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
>suggestions?

if the local trash ordinance allows, just toss the sharps containers in the trash. and by the way,
the hospital incinerated them, they were never recycled.

Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org

In tribute to the United States of America and the State of Israel, two bastions of strength in a
world filled with strife and terrorism.
 
M

Marshall

Guest
I knew that but considered it a form of recycling, if nothing else the molten mess would be added to
a land fill. On another note I heard some talk about recycling not being worth the trouble for
anything from paper to tin cans.

You will need RealPlayer to hear this: http://discover.npr.org/features/feature.jhtml?wfId=1142651

Mack wrote:
> On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 22:43:57 GMT, Marshall <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
>>suggestions?
>
>
>
> if the local trash ordinance allows, just toss the sharps containers in the trash. and by the way,
> the hospital incinerated them, they were never recycled.
>
> Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org
>
> In tribute to the United States of America and the State of Israel, two bastions of strength in a
> world filled with strife and terrorism.

--
http://homepage.mac.com/mkatzman/
 
G

George Eberhard

Guest
"Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> suggestions?
> --
I used to put them in a plastic bottle, and throw the bottle in the trash. After all I know that I
don't have any blood born diseases.

Then I read a letter from a person who works at a garbage disposal site, running and repairing the
heavy equipment. He said that needles, even in heavy containers, pose a serious danger to workers,
and asked us to use medical disposal. So that's what I do now, and I would ask you to do the same.

George
--
George Eberhardt
(732)224-8988
 
S

Simm Webb

Guest
I purchased an electrical wire stripper years ago. With this, I snip off the needle from the syringe
and discard the syringe normally. I use a large prescription bottle to save the needles in, and
after a year, I wrap them up and toss them out. I haven't had any trouble, especially after a refuse
man happened to see a syringe, and took the cap off of it, and found it useless.

On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 22:43:57 GMT, Marshall <[email protected]> wrote:

>My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
>suggestions?

Soon, I will be put to sleep, If I wake up in heaven, I will be ecstatic If I wake up at the clinic,
I will be grateful.
 
S

Sue S

Guest
"George Eberhardt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> > suggestions?
> > --
> I used to put them in a plastic bottle, and throw the bottle in the trash. After all I know that I
> don't have any blood born diseases.
>
> Then I read a letter from a person who works at a garbage disposal site, running and repairing the
> heavy equipment. He said that needles, even in heavy containers, pose a serious danger to workers,
> and asked us to use medical disposal. So that's what I do now, and I would ask you to do the same.
>
> George
> --
> George Eberhardt
> (732)224-8988
>
>
>
Where I am, in Illinois, the hospitals will not accept syringes for disposal. Diabetes Educator said
we have to put them in something like detergent bottles and put them in the trash. She said the
trash people won't accept sharps containers. bit that the detergent bottles are okay.

Sue S
 
M

Mike Gray

Guest
George Eberhardt wrote:

> "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
>> suggestions?
>> --
> I used to put them in a plastic bottle, and throw the bottle in the trash. After all I know that I
> don't have any blood born diseases.
>
> Then I read a letter from a person who works at a garbage disposal site, running and repairing the
> heavy equipment. He said that needles, even in heavy containers, pose a serious danger to workers,
> and asked us to use medical disposal. So that's what I do now, and I would ask you to do the same.

They are shipped from the manufacturer to the distributor to the retailer in flimsy plastic bags
inside a flimsy cardboard box. The retailer puts them in a flimsy plastic bag for me for
transport home.

And some guy driving a Cat D9 considers tham a serious danger???????

Maybe he needs a career change.
 
B

Beav

Guest
"Elizabeth Blake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> > suggestions?
>
> In NYC, you're supposed to put them in a leakproof, puncture proof container, seal it up & label
> it and put it in the regular trash.

Please don't tell me that NY has a person who sifts through all the garbage looking for writing
that's "non standard" on any (and all presumably) leak proof, puncture proof containers? What do
they do when they find these containers? I bet they throw them in the trash.

I use the
> commercial sharps containers. I reuse pen needles & syringes so it takes
me
> awhile to fill one up. I do always wrap it in a bag before putting it in the trash bag.

You can't do that. The trash inspector won't be able to read the label and your container might slip
through the net and end un..... in the trash:)

I know that some of the service staff where I live wouldn't
> be too happy seeing it, even if it is sealed. A couple of years ago they sent letters around
> asking people to not just throw insulin syringes into the trash, as one of the service staff
> got poked.

And they knew it was an insulin syringe and not a heroin syringe? Did the person responsible for
this lack of care not LABEL the syringe "For diabetic use only". Shame on him.

>
> Sometimes I have to change my pen needle at work. I put the little inner cap back on, and the
> bigger outer cap from a new needle over that. Then I tape it all up with heavy tape, put it in an
> envelope, fold that up and
tape
> it. I get paranoid that someone might get hurt.

I just put the spent needle in the pen case where the new one came from and then throw it out the
car window on the way home. Or I leave it lying in an ashtray if I happen to spot one (and that's
getting harder these days:)

Beav
 
B

Beav

Guest
"t2_lurking" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Com'on Beav he's trying to do the right thing.

Yeah, but when he's arsed about by the hospital, it's time to do the ordinary thing, which is what
most people do. shove 'em in the trash. Some put them in a bottle or a can first and some don't, but
that's where they ALL end up (even those in "real" sharps bins from the hospital. They all end up at
he same landfill sites.

> I just put 'em in a soda can. I know there has...has to be worse things in the trash.

I would imagine there's worse things in the street too.

Beav
 
B

Beav

Guest
"mike gray, CID" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]gtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> Beav wrote:
>
> > "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> >> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for
recycling
> >> of needles etc. Any suggestions?
> >
> > Shove 'em in the bin. If you're REALLY picky about these things, shove
'em
> > in an empty tin and THEN shove 'em in the bin.
> >
> > It's what I've done for 16 years
>
> Aren't you worried that the rats at the dump may accidently stick themselves and catch diabetes?

I used to be, but then I thought "Bollockls to the rats, they'd **** on me given half a chance, so
it's time to get my own back first;)

Then multiply and invade the town you
> live in, biting children in their sleep?

If it stops the kids from crying in the middle of the night. I'm all for it. Noisy little bleeders
they are;)

Spreading diabetes to every
> corner of the shire,

I've beaten them to that!

destroying social order, creating havoc, and
> toppling the crown?

That's called democracy (or living for years under Maggie Thatcher, which NO-ONE would ever consier
a "good thing")

Easing an invasion of godless heathens from the east
> who will slaughter yer parents and rape yer daughters?

They're here now, and one of them's living in my house. We used to call 'em Vikings;-)
>
> Here in the US we just save them up 'til October and give em to the kids at Halloween.

I wait 'til the day BEFORE Halloween and and fire 'em at the kids with a

after and I get some peace, and isn't that what the world really wants? Peace? :)

Beav
 
B

Beav

Guest
"Alan Mackenzie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Beav <[email protected]> wrote on Sat, 14 Feb 2004 00:01:47 -0000:
>
> > "Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> >> My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for
recycling
> >> of needles etc. Any suggestions?
>
> > Shove 'em in the bin. If you're REALLY picky about these things, shove
'em
> > in an empty tin and THEN shove 'em in the bin.
>
> > It's what I've done for 16 years
>
> Same here (except it's more like 40 years). Nowadays all the syringes and needles I use have a
> plastic cover which clips firmly onto them, or (in the case of pen needles) snugly embraces them.
> They're difficult to remove by accident.

Beinf serious (for a change) tat's always been my tke on it Al. the syringes have a "hard case" over
the needle and the pen needles have caps. Anyone daft enough to start playing with 'em DESERVES a
*****, but that's ALL they'd get. They wouldn't CATCH anything unless we carried the dreaded lurgy
or summat.

As for lancets, well I use 'em 'til they won't puncture the skin without the help of a small hammer
blow, so THEY'RE no danger to anyone.

Beav
 
B

Beav

Guest
"Marshall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I knew that but considered it a form of recycling, if nothing else the molten mess would be added
> to a land fill. On another note I heard some talk about recycling not being worth the trouble for
> anything from paper to tin cans.

They can't re-cycle syringes because there're two different materials involved. Hell, they even have
trouble re-cycling plastic if it's green and not blue, and god forbid you should put trash in the
wrong coloured re-cyc bag.

did that. She probably got another 50 quid fine for not having the bag at the correct angle on the
street too!

When this "PC World" has reached this level, it's time to fight back. Dump your charps on the town
hall steps and have done :)_

Beav

>
> You will need RealPlayer to hear this: http://discover.npr.org/features/feature.jhtml?wfId=1142651
>
>
>
> Mack wrote:
> > On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 22:43:57 GMT, Marshall <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >
> >>My local hospital is no longer accepting sharps containers for recycling of needles etc. Any
> >>suggestions?
> >
> >
> >
> > if the local trash ordinance allows, just toss the sharps containers in the trash. and by the
> > way, the hospital incinerated them, they were never recycled.
> >
> > Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org
> >
> > In tribute to the United States of America and the State of Israel, two bastions of strength in
> > a world filled with strife and terrorism.
>
> --
> http://homepage.mac.com/mkatzman/
 
C

Colleen

Guest
"Beav" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "t2_lurking" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> berlin.de...
> > Com'on Beav he's trying to do the right thing.
>
> Yeah, but when he's arsed about by the hospital, it's time to do the ordinary thing, which is what
> most people do. shove 'em in the trash. Some put them in a bottle or a can first and some don't,
> but that's where they ALL end up (even those in "real" sharps bins from the hospital. They all
end
> up at he same landfill sites.
>
> > I just put 'em in a soda can. I know there has...has to be worse things
in
> > the trash.
>
> I would imagine there's worse things in the street too.
>
> Beav
>

I was walking near our lakefront one day and there was an entire bag of syringes lying by the
sidewalk in front of some very exclusive condos. I went in and called the manager of the complex and
told him. Don't what happened to them but I wasn't going to mess with them. c