Lock Ring on Fixie??

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Gags, Aug 18, 2005.

  1. Gags

    Gags Guest

    As stated in a previous post, I recently joined the ranks of "those who own
    a fixie" - does that make me a "fixee" or a "fixer"??

    Anyways, the guy that I bought the bike off owns a bike shop in Lakes
    Entrance (Bicycle Passion from memory) and has been riding fixed gear bikes
    for years. The rear hub doesn't have a lock ring on it and the guy reckons
    that this is good as it allows the cog to unscrew if you manage to lock up
    your legs for whatever reason. I was a bit sceptical about this thinking
    that it would unwind the first time I tried to control my speed down a hill
    by resisting on the pedals but he reckons that I will apply much more
    pressure climbing up a hill than I will resisting going down one and so it
    is unlikely that the cog will unscrew. Anyone else running a setup like
    this??

    Also, I have only been for a couple of short rides up and down the street on
    the new fixie and it is definately different. It is OK going uphill but I
    found that trying to resist on downhill is a bit weird, and at this stage I
    am not real good at trackstanding. I can generally trackstand OK on a
    normal roadie but I am used to pedalling backwards slightly to get my feet
    back into position without actually moving but of course this causes the
    whole bike to go backwards. I guess that I need to setup in the right spot
    and then rock back and forth slightly. I suggested this to one of the guys
    who rides a SS to work and he said that he has seen a guy on a fixie at a
    red light doing circles in reverse!!!!! I gotta learn how to do that!!!

    Ride On,

    Gags
     
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  2. NoZX6R

    NoZX6R Guest

    Gags wrote:
    > As stated in a previous post, I recently joined the ranks of "those who own
    > a fixie" - does that make me a "fixee" or a "fixer"??
    >
    > Anyways, the guy that I bought the bike off owns a bike shop in Lakes
    > Entrance (Bicycle Passion from memory) and has been riding fixed gear bikes
    > for years. The rear hub doesn't have a lock ring on it and the guy reckons
    > that this is good as it allows the cog to unscrew if you manage to lock up
    > your legs for whatever reason. I was a bit sceptical about this thinking
    > that it would unwind the first time I tried to control my speed down a hill
    > by resisting on the pedals but he reckons that I will apply much more
    > pressure climbing up a hill than I will resisting going down one and so it
    > is unlikely that the cog will unscrew. Anyone else running a setup like
    > this??
    >
    > Also, I have only been for a couple of short rides up and down the street on
    > the new fixie and it is definately different. It is OK going uphill but I
    > found that trying to resist on downhill is a bit weird, and at this stage I
    > am not real good at trackstanding. I can generally trackstand OK on a
    > normal roadie but I am used to pedalling backwards slightly to get my feet
    > back into position without actually moving but of course this causes the
    > whole bike to go backwards. I guess that I need to setup in the right spot
    > and then rock back and forth slightly. I suggested this to one of the guys
    > who rides a SS to work and he said that he has seen a guy on a fixie at a
    > red light doing circles in reverse!!!!! I gotta learn how to do that!!!
    >
    > Ride On,
    >
    > Gags
    >
    >


    don't worry about it Gags. I've been riding a rear hub that has no
    lockring thread and the cog never moved. I've since changed to a record
    hub but didn't bother to get a lockring. Once again, the cog hasn't moved.

    Rocking backwards is something I'm still getting used to. Just keep
    practicing, and maybe unclip one foot until you get more comfy with it.

    Now riding your freewheel bikes is gonna feel very weird :)

    --
    Nick
     
  3. Koon Yong

    Koon Yong New Member

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    Generally, the bike is the "FIXIE" and the rider is the "FIXER".

    As for the lockring, it depends on how you ride. If you use your brakes alot and don't resist the pedals, then I think no lockring is OK. I need a lockring coz I rarely use the brake even though it's physically there. In my experience, should you unintentionally lock up your legs, you're more likely to be "thrown off" the bike then have the cog unscrew unless it was badly installed in the 1st place.

    Koon
     
  4. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    woot!

    im thinkin of draggin TB1 out next week if its dry (and warm, and free-beer day, and...)

    go study....

    http://www.63xc.com/gregg/101_1.htm

    PS simplest tip i can give is "don't think"

    PPS The freewheeled bike WILL feel like the BB is broken or summat after riding fixed. a wierd sensation...
     
  5. Gumby

    Gumby Guest

    Gags wrote:
    he has seen a guy on a fixie at a
    > red light doing circles in reverse!!!!!


    I have gotta see that!
     
  6. Resound

    Resound Guest

    "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > As stated in a previous post, I recently joined the ranks of "those who
    > own
    > a fixie" - does that make me a "fixee" or a "fixer"??
    >
    > Anyways, the guy that I bought the bike off owns a bike shop in Lakes
    > Entrance (Bicycle Passion from memory) and has been riding fixed gear
    > bikes
    > for years. The rear hub doesn't have a lock ring on it and the guy
    > reckons
    > that this is good as it allows the cog to unscrew if you manage to lock up
    > your legs for whatever reason. I was a bit sceptical about this thinking
    > that it would unwind the first time I tried to control my speed down a
    > hill
    > by resisting on the pedals but he reckons that I will apply much more
    > pressure climbing up a hill than I will resisting going down one and so it
    > is unlikely that the cog will unscrew. Anyone else running a setup like
    > this??
    >
    > Also, I have only been for a couple of short rides up and down the street
    > on
    > the new fixie and it is definately different. It is OK going uphill but I
    > found that trying to resist on downhill is a bit weird, and at this stage
    > I
    > am not real good at trackstanding. I can generally trackstand OK on a
    > normal roadie but I am used to pedalling backwards slightly to get my feet
    > back into position without actually moving but of course this causes the
    > whole bike to go backwards. I guess that I need to setup in the right
    > spot
    > and then rock back and forth slightly. I suggested this to one of the
    > guys
    > who rides a SS to work and he said that he has seen a guy on a fixie at a
    > red light doing circles in reverse!!!!! I gotta learn how to do that!!!
    >
    > Ride On,
    >
    > Gags
    >
    >


    I'm riding with no lockring and no problems, even though I'm using the brake
    less and less as time goes by. I've found that if I brain fade and try to
    coast standing up (usually if I've neglected the fixie for a while) it won't
    even think about unscrewing, it just reminds me *very* pointedly that
    coasting isn't allowed. Different gearing may change this. I'm running about
    72-74" (not sure whether front chainring is 42t or 44t; haven't counted) but
    I did unscrew it a couple of times when I had the 20t rear cog which
    resulted in about 58" gearing. In other words shorter gearing could make it
    easier to unscrew the rear cog due to better leverge. That could also have
    been due to the not-quite-appropriate thread pitch though.
     
  7. On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 21:12:53 +1000, Gags wrote:

    > As stated in a previous post, I recently joined the ranks of "those who own
    > a fixie" - does that make me a "fixee" or a "fixer"??


    It may make you one of those zealots who endlessly mock the last 70 or so
    years of bicycle development :)

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  8. Brian Watson

    Brian Watson Guest

  9. Brian Watson

    Brian Watson Guest

  10. sinus

    sinus New Member

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    Sounds like dodgy advice to me. Your cog will unscrew if your legs lock up but it is unlikely to unsrew because of pressure from climbing. Huh.

    Locking legs up is something I have never heard anyone doing. Particularly not on a fixie :D

    Unless you're running two brakes, use a lockring. If one brake fails, you need some sort of backup.
     
  11. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    sinus wrote:
    > Gags Wrote:


    >> Sounds like dodgy advice to me. Your cog will unscrew if your legs
    >> lock up but it is unlikely to unsrew because of pressure from climbing.


    > Locking legs up is something I have never heard anyone doing.
    > Particularly not on a fixie :D


    My younger brother rode a track bike everywhere in the fifties when we were
    both a lot younger. Had no brakes. He could lock up the rear wheel any time.
    I could never manage it. He never unscrewed a cog but had lock-rings. His
    was a proper two-geared fixie, one cog on each side of the hub. Reverse the
    wheel for the other gear. My older brother got cautioned once on his
    five-speed by the local copper for doing 42mph in a 35 zone on a level road.
    He was passing a car a the time. Hehe.

    Theo
     
  12. Gumby

    Gumby Guest

  13. sinus

    sinus New Member

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    Skidding is a skill I am learning. Not as easy as i would have thought. Also a bit worried about the amount of tyre tread I am leaving behind

    It would be a bit painful having a cog unscrew while skidding. Same hurt as breaking a chain, I would think. Lockrings are cheap insurance AFAIK.
     
  14. Andrew Blake

    Andrew Blake Guest

    On Topic: lock rings; They're cheap, only $10 or so aren't they? Mine is a
    Dura-Ace, and was US$7.95, and the possible carnage that could happen if you
    spun the cog off, jammed it in the dropout, and then threw the chain into
    the wheel... no thanks.

    Off Topic:
    I believe "Put your junk on the stem" is the way the required posture for
    long skids is usually described.

    So any of those exposed bolt, deep drop quill stems would be a touch
    dangerous to use when attempting big skids.

    I've managed to pop short skids from low speeds on concrete with some
    texture, 42x16 on 700c, and get enough force to rotate the wheel backwards
    whilst doing it (Does that count as stress relieving?), which then causes it
    to hop when I stop resisting.

    Clipless pedals help a lot, I'm using Candy SL's on Lake casual shoes. Pick
    a foot to lead with, move your weight forwards, then pull up at the front,
    push down at the back and slide. Hop the back wheel if it helps.

    I've got my new BB in (Big thumbs up to the guys at Bicycle Revolution, West
    End, for getting me a Campy BB at a good price, buying the tool and then
    letting me install it in their workshop,) so I'll rebuild the bike tonight
    and see if I can't find some polished concrete to practice distance on.
    Gatorskins have plenty of tread I'm told.

    "sinus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Skidding is a skill I am learning. Not as easy as i would have thought.
    > Also a bit worried about the amount of tyre tread I am leaving behind
    >
    > It would be a bit painful having a cog unscrew while skidding. Same
    > hurt as breaking a chain, I would think. Lockrings are cheap insurance
    > AFAIK.
     
  15. Gemma_k

    Gemma_k Guest

    "sinus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >> >

    > It would be a bit painful having a cog unscrew while skidding. Same
    > hurt as breaking a chain, I would think. Lockrings are cheap insurance
    > AFAIK.

    It can be pretty painful whether you're skidding or not. If you're riding
    track or in a group - use a lockring. Throwing a chain/cog into the wheel,
    and losing the ability to stop (if you have no other brakes) can be somewhat
    embarrassing. If it happens on the track you'll probably have someone run
    up your ring as you try to get off the track, if you're lucky enough not to
    have something lock up. More embarassing is to have the cog unscrew as you
    head down the ramp into the pits.....
     
  16. geoffs

    geoffs New Member

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    I needed to buy another lockring the other day so I asked at my lbs wether they had one. Not on the rack but there was one on a bike they had sitting in the loft.
    It was expensive lockring as I bought the bike it was on :)
    A 60 cm Blom with Record hubs and seatpost with Dura-ace cranks. The rims are Nisi tubulars which require new tires but I've never ridden on singles before so it should be fun to try.
    $150

    Cheers

    Geoff
     
  17. sinus

    sinus New Member

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    what a bargain. Even if the frame didn't fit, it'd be worth it.

    i am so jealous.

    ps. i think they are $15 at Peter Moore.
     
  18. On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 15:27:59 +0930, Gemma_k wrote:

    > embarrassing. If it happens on the track you'll probably have someone run
    > up your ring as you try to get off the track


    That sounds /really/ unpleasant. Does staying seated prevent it?

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  19. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2005-08-19, sinus (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > geoffs Wrote:
    >> I needed to buy another lockring the other day so I asked at my lbs
    >> wether they had one. Not on the rack but there was one on a bike they
    >> had sitting in the loft.
    >> It was expensive lockring as I bought the bike it was on :)
    >> A 60 cm Blom with Record hubs and seatpost with Dura-ace cranks. The
    >> rims are Nisi tubulars which require new tires but I've never ridden on
    >> singles before so it should be fun to try.
    >> $150

    >
    > what a bargain. Even if the frame didn't fit, it'd be worth it.
    >
    > i am so jealous.
    >
    > ps. i think they are $15 at Peter Moore.


    Complete with bike? I might have to take a visit :)

    --
    TimC
    One hundred hairy bugs in the code, one hundred hairy bugs....Fix one
    bug, compile it again, 101 hairy bugs. Repeat until BUGS = 0. --unknown
     
  20. sinus

    sinus New Member

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    for a limited time only, terms and conditions apply, offer expires shortly, not valid with any other offer.....

    and then back to regular pricing for accessories that can be purchased with lock rings. Base price, lock ring only, $15 (or something like that).

    I went to buy a brake cable and ended up with rim and spokes. The shop is a bit like that - don't go with a credit card unless you've got good self control.
     
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