LOL -- Dog Food for ARFricanz!

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by NYC XYZ, Feb 2, 2006.

  1. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    See, nobody likes a liberal do-gooder!

    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationw...feb02,0,7596795.story?coll=la-headlines-world



    EXCERPTS

    ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia - Kenyan government officials Wednesday issued
    a testy "thanks, but no thanks" to a New Zealand entrepreneur's offer
    to help stem hunger with a powdered formula similar to one she
    developed for dogs.

    The ensuing controversy has raised accusations of colonial-era racism
    and tragic misunderstanding in a nation facing the possibility of
    famine for 2.5 million of its citizens.

    Christine Drummond, the dog-food company owner who made the offer,
    insisted that the freeze-dried meat powder she wants to send is not dog
    food, but a new, separately manufactured nutritional supplement that
    can be mixed with water and tastes "yummy."

    Nevertheless, on the streets of Nairobi, the offer has been condemned
    as "insulting" and "racist." Some Kenyans said they would sooner starve
    than eat a product derived from Drummond's Mighty Mix dog biscuits. If
    the powder is so delicious, they suggested, it should be fed to New
    Zealand children.

    "Our children aren't puppies, madam," blared a headline in Kenya's The
    Nation newspaper, where furious readers sent letters of protest.

    For many, the offer rekindled resentment over colonial-era arrogance.

    "For us Kenyans, it's a racial insult," said Julius Kwea, 39, of
    Nairobi. "If it's made for dogs, let it be for dogs."

    Njoki Agnes, a vegetable vendor in Nairobi and mother of four, said the
    offer was typical of "white people's behavior."

    "Sending us food made for dogs is taking advantage of the famine
    situation in our country," she said.

    Reached by telephone at her home in Canterbury, Drummond, 48, said she
    was only trying to help after a friend's daughter told her about
    Kenya's growing hunger problem. She blamed media in Kenya and New
    Zealand for reporting that she was offering dog food.

    "I have so much heart for Kenyans," Drummond said. "I want to apologize
    to the government for what the media has created. I never intended to
    offend anyone." She said her powder, consisting of dried beef, mutton,
    garlic, kelp and other products, is full of energy-boosting nutrients.

    "I eat it myself," she said.

    Drummond said she developed the supplement after creating a similar
    product for dogs, but insisted that the human formula was different,
    and was manufactured in a separate facility.

    Drummond said she has not sold the product publicly, but intends to.

    But Kenyan officials suggest that next time, Drummond should offer
    cash, or work through an aid organization.

    "She's trying to do something without really understanding the culture
    or thinking about the people she is trying to help," government
    spokesman Alfred Mutua said. "And it creates a very negative stereotype
    about Africa and Africans."

    A freeze-dried meat powder probably would not be understood or consumed
    in remote, rural areas affected by the drought, government and aid
    officials said.

    Besides, said Mutua, the region that Drummond hoped to assist - an
    island in Lake Victoria - is not among those severely affected by the
    drought.
     
    Tags:


  2. sissy

    sissy Guest

    Why not buy some for your kids?? They will surely grow healthy and strong
    like the dogs in New zeland. It will be great for science too.




    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > See, nobody likes a liberal do-gooder!
    >
    >

    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationw...feb02,0,7596795.story?coll=la-headlines-world
    >
    >
    >
    > EXCERPTS
    >
    > ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia - Kenyan government officials Wednesday issued
    > a testy "thanks, but no thanks" to a New Zealand entrepreneur's offer
    > to help stem hunger with a powdered formula similar to one she
    > developed for dogs.
    >
    > The ensuing controversy has raised accusations of colonial-era racism
    > and tragic misunderstanding in a nation facing the possibility of
    > famine for 2.5 million of its citizens.
    >
    > Christine Drummond, the dog-food company owner who made the offer,
    > insisted that the freeze-dried meat powder she wants to send is not dog
    > food, but a new, separately manufactured nutritional supplement that
    > can be mixed with water and tastes "yummy."
    >
    > Nevertheless, on the streets of Nairobi, the offer has been condemned
    > as "insulting" and "racist." Some Kenyans said they would sooner starve
    > than eat a product derived from Drummond's Mighty Mix dog biscuits. If
    > the powder is so delicious, they suggested, it should be fed to New
    > Zealand children.
    >
    > "Our children aren't puppies, madam," blared a headline in Kenya's The
    > Nation newspaper, where furious readers sent letters of protest.
    >
    > For many, the offer rekindled resentment over colonial-era arrogance.
    >
    > "For us Kenyans, it's a racial insult," said Julius Kwea, 39, of
    > Nairobi. "If it's made for dogs, let it be for dogs."
    >
    > Njoki Agnes, a vegetable vendor in Nairobi and mother of four, said the
    > offer was typical of "white people's behavior."
    >
    > "Sending us food made for dogs is taking advantage of the famine
    > situation in our country," she said.
    >
    > Reached by telephone at her home in Canterbury, Drummond, 48, said she
    > was only trying to help after a friend's daughter told her about
    > Kenya's growing hunger problem. She blamed media in Kenya and New
    > Zealand for reporting that she was offering dog food.
    >
    > "I have so much heart for Kenyans," Drummond said. "I want to apologize
    > to the government for what the media has created. I never intended to
    > offend anyone." She said her powder, consisting of dried beef, mutton,
    > garlic, kelp and other products, is full of energy-boosting nutrients.
    >
    > "I eat it myself," she said.
    >
    > Drummond said she developed the supplement after creating a similar
    > product for dogs, but insisted that the human formula was different,
    > and was manufactured in a separate facility.
    >
    > Drummond said she has not sold the product publicly, but intends to.
    >
    > But Kenyan officials suggest that next time, Drummond should offer
    > cash, or work through an aid organization.
    >
    > "She's trying to do something without really understanding the culture
    > or thinking about the people she is trying to help," government
    > spokesman Alfred Mutua said. "And it creates a very negative stereotype
    > about Africa and Africans."
    >
    > A freeze-dried meat powder probably would not be understood or consumed
    > in remote, rural areas affected by the drought, government and aid
    > officials said.
    >
    > Besides, said Mutua, the region that Drummond hoped to assist - an
    > island in Lake Victoria - is not among those severely affected by the
    > drought.
    >
     
  3. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest


    > "She's trying to do something without really understanding the culture
    > or thinking about the people she is trying to help," government
    > spokesman Alfred Mutua said. "And it creates a very negative stereotype
    > about Africa and Africans."


    Besides, there are many Muslims in Africa, and
    "Traditionally, dogs have been seen as impure, and the Islamic legal
    tradition has developed several injunctions that warn Muslims against
    most contact with dogs."
    http://www.islamicconcern.com/dogs.asp

    X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.society.liberalism,soc.culture.african
     
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