Long Distance Cycling

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Rhynotes, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    I always wear compression shorts/bibs no matter how long or short the ride. As far as compression base layer tops go, I've done 100 mile rides both with and without. They help, but I really don't like wearing anything under my outer jersey in very warm weather. It's a trade off. I find that compression does help reduce shoulder and lower back discomfort.
     


  2. rwcyclewear

    rwcyclewear New Member

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    That's interesting to note mpre53. That's because I personally don't like overly compressive lycra on long rides. Its got to be just right.

    The base layer comment is useful.

    Going back to Bibs, do you have any favourite? Something you reach for whenever you go for a ride.
     
  3. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

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    I'm with you on this. I can't wear a compression shirt for very long because it will cut off circulation in the area between my triceps and armpits, causing numbness in my lower arms. That, and they're a major pain for me to take off (I have decent-sized arms and shoulders, and a corresponding lack of flexibility in those areas).
     
  4. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Yes, I like my shorts and bibs with more compression, which for me are Desoto 400 mile bibs and shorts. I typically wear my club kit (Hincapie) if I am doing 50 miles or less. It may not really make a difference, but just based on preference I like the compression in general. With my legs being a little bigger than the model cyclists the compression is probably even more enhanced.
     
  5. rwcyclewear

    rwcyclewear New Member

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    I understand you. I struggle to squeeze into compression garments as well and struggle to find lycra that supports without constricting. That's the reason I started RedWhite in August.

    Compression gear just isn't for all of us I guess. But there is a huge market for it :)
     
  6. rwcyclewear

    rwcyclewear New Member

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    Hi Felt_Rider,

    Thanks for this feedback! I do know De Soto but have never tried their Bibs before. Have you worn your De Sotos on rides above 100 miles?

    The Bibs i've designed focus on 3 key areas (for long distance riding):

    1) Supportive but not constrictive lycra
    2) An plush chamois
    3) Fit, fit fit
     
  7. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Mostly limited to 100 or just a bit over.
     
  8. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    I have a variety of bibs. Aero Tech, PI, Primal (including the Performance Ultras made by Primal), and DeMarchi. The ones I reach for on a ride over 60 miles are the DeMarchis.

    I have worn my Aero Tech bibs on 100 mile rides in the past, and they are an excellent every day training bib. Great value and quality for the dollar.
     
  9. rwcyclewear

    rwcyclewear New Member

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    I assume that's the Aero Tech Endurance shorts? Not overly compressive with a generous pad?
     
  10. rwcyclewear

    rwcyclewear New Member

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    I see! That's roughly 160km. Nice blog by the way. I see you're using Flo wheels on your tri rig.
     
  11. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    Not sure. Aero Tech has had several designs over the years. My newer ones have a thick pad, and the oldest pair have a very thin one. I've done 100 mile rides in both styles.
     
  12. goldenmaine

    goldenmaine New Member

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    Enjoy the trip and have fun. Long distances are very tiring and take a toll on the body, especially the legs, but if you enjoy what you are doing and are having fun then it will be easier to finish your “voyage.” I have also done long distances and it is more fun when you are with people and finish it together with family and friends or a bike club.
     
  13. sixxup

    sixxup New Member

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    You can not ride an extra 10+ miles from your daily training routine. I suppose to keep adding two miles after two days, as that will make you able to again ride back, making it 4miles after two days. If you are comfortable with that, then try riding a bit far to gauge yourself.
     
  14. BHappy

    BHappy New Member

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    To the original poster.
    Bring celeri or carrot sticks or any vegies.
    I have to think you are overweight because this is a short ride for a 12 years old. So you can progress, go for 30 min.,,, 40,,, 50 the miles do not really count. Vegies will supply the water and give you a good habit added to your new habit of moving. You can do like a star 5 minutes away South than back, than north, east, west so you will be close to home. With time you will venture farther and need $, a flat repair kit,...
    Keep on smiling :)
     
  15. ABNPFDR

    ABNPFDR Member

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    I started road cycling at 14 - I was doing 20to 40 mile rides, mostly doing laps around a large park a few miles from where I lived. An entire "lap" was 6 miles so the round trip once around the entire park was 10 miles. There were 3 sections of the park so by adding additional loops, I could extend out the distance. I had a nothing special department store bike and an old mechanical speedometer. Very low budget but it was a start. I saved up all my money from my paper route and from working at McDonalds and the next year, bought a new road bike, what would be the equivalent of an Allez or Trek 1.1 in the modern era.

    As you can imagine, the loops around the park were getting kind of old by this point so I started riding just here or there. I was riding 60 to 70 mile rides by the end of that summer 3-6 times a week. We're talking 1987 so no cell phone. I carried a spare tube, a pump, a tire lever and water. That was about it. No ID. I did carry some change for the pay phone in the event of an emergency. Never had to call them which is a good thing since they had no idea I was riding so far away from home.

    Road cycling does not have to be fancy or expensive. If you are not comfortable riding far from home, ride loops. And when you start riding further and further away, at least have a plan for when the unexpected happens.

    Interesting footnote. That loop in the park that I used to love to ride... Fast forward 29 years and there is a Triathlon of sorts in that park every year and the last two years I've raced it. The first year as an Ironman, doing the whole event (came in 3rd) and this past year as part of a corporate team (1st). I STILL love riding that loop and it's even way better in a race. There is a short 50 vertical feet climb that is just a beast as far as steepness goes. There is a hairpin turn going into it so you carry zero momentum into the climb. Hills like that are why I like cycling.
     
  16. Connie858

    Connie858 New Member

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    Just get on your bike and ride. You will find the more you ride the further you will be able to ride. you will need more food and water to start off with, but as your body adapt, you will need less and less. You don't need to venture far from home at all to cover 20 miles if you consider cycling in a circle around your home area

    I had a 22 mile each way, three times a week commute which I did for 2.5 years. On the weekends I would routinely go out for 65 miles rides with my OH who would want to ride. The other days I would often have other local commutes which would be extended if needed. It was not uncommon for me to cover 600-800 miles a month. But it takes time to build up to that fitness level. I only stopped that because of an rupture disc in my spine - it has left me partially paralysed and I am still working out life again and just getting back to cycling on a recumbent trike.

    What you carry with you depends of how secure you feel where you are and how prepared you are for a long walk or wait to get home.

    Personally I carry tyre levers (3), self adhesive patches, a pump (always on the bike), an emergency snack, water and a normal snack. I have my inhalers because I'm asthmatic, steroid tablets because of a medical condition I have and will carry a spare layer simply because I live in the UK and the weather is so b****y unpredictable. Getting soaked to the skin and cold will leave me ill. I wear a medic alert bracelet, so if anything happens relevant medical information on my wrist (here's hoping it is still attached). If I am out all day, then I will have a meal with me because I can't eat out (being allergic (not intolerant) to dairy is not fun) and I will have a small amount of cash with me. I usually carry my phone nowadays but never used to because I lived in an area with no signal and cycled in an area with no signal so that is a decision you have to make yourself as is all of the above.
     
  17. kana_marie

    kana_marie Member

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    I'm in the same place you are. I'm trying to build my way up to further distances. I try to increase by a short ways every 2 days or so.
     
  18. schwinnhund

    schwinnhund New Member

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    20 miles??? That's nothing, even for me, and I am over 55 and overweight. I ride that far almost every day (it's 9 miles to the nearest town).

    Ride some centuries. Start at 50 miles, and work up to 100, 200, and even 300-mile multi-day trips. Then, you are doing long-distance cycling.

    You need to be self-sufficient on the road. Make sure you have a good multi-tool kit, tire repair kit, a pair of pliers, and an adjustable wrench. With these tools, you can fix anything that will go wrong, that can be fixed on the road. Learn how to do basic road repairs. Always check your bike thoroughly before you leave.

    Always have your cell phone, charged fully, and bring the charging cable with you to recharge the phone at restaurants, etc.... Bike computers are nice, but they don't do anything you can't do with maps, a wristwatch, and the ability to do math. I did long-distance a long time before they had bike computers.

    I'd keep the equipment to a minimum. A credit card weighs a lot less. and hostels and motel rooms are easier than lugging a tent and camping gear, unless you actually are going to camp somewhere cool, like a lake, river, etc.... Just have a change of clothes, minimum toiletries, and let someone know where you are going and what route you are taking, before you leave.

    The most important thing to take is water. At least 2 bottles, 4 is even better. It can be a long time between refills in some areas.

    Most of all...have fun. It's not just a ride, it's an adventure.
     
  19. Jojo83

    Jojo83 New Member

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    Long distance cycling is a lot of fun... But, you have to be sure that you are in peak condition before even attempting long distances. Train frequently before the long distance ride, so that your body is prepared for this tough task. You can't enjoy your long distance ride if you're constantly tired and cramping up during the ride.
     
  20. egrocket

    egrocket New Member

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    I would start off with sprinting a mile on the bike and see how you feel. If you feel great then sprint another mile, then go on until you can't breathe.
     
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