Long distance saddle choice

Discussion in 'Touring and recreational cycling' started by yannshukor, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. yannshukor

    yannshukor New Member

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    Every year I travel home to Nice, on my own, from a European capital with my bike ex. Paris, Salzburg, Naples, etc.
    Last year I started off from Madrid, and this year from Berlin; both of these trips took me nine days (~1500 kms).

    I ride a Giant Defy Advanced bicycle equipped with disk brakes and Zipp 303 wheels.

    My current saddle, ASTUTE Skylite, replaced the original Fizik saddle that came with the bicycle; I was told that most manufacturers equip their bikes with 'lesser' versions of saddles in order to trim the overall cost.

    Previously I rode a TREK fitted with a Selle Italia saddle.

    My main difficulty during these trips is my back side; which is what led me to your comprehensive article.

    The sit-bone area becomes swollen and blistered and understandably quite painful; Compeed and Doliprane/Neurofen are my only recourse

    Having adopted a vegan diet I have also chosen to avoid leather based products.

    I'm still searching for THE saddle that will allow me to pursue such trips without the suffering.

    I'm currently considering a Brooks C15 (or C13 145) saddle

    Should I accept that it is the mileage and duration of these trips that is to blame for my plight and will remain thus whatever saddle I may choose ?
     
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  2. yannshukor

    yannshukor New Member

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    When I wrote blisters, I meant sores. Sorry.
    I wear an Assos T.Cento bib designed for long distances (purchased 2015) and apply copious amounts of Assos chamois cream
    Each evening I wash my clothes with shampoo in my hotel room
    In preparation, during the year, I cycle once a week 60-80k with at least a 500m climb
    I'm 1,72m and 68kgs
     
    #2 yannshukor, Sep 20, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2017
  3. yannshukor

    yannshukor New Member

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    My research has brought me to look at the Well model developped by Selle SMP

    The resellers are able to lend you a saddle in order to try it out for a few days, which is exactly what I plan to do
     
  4. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Sores and blisters come from several sources: First and foremost of course is the saddle fit. A saddle should not touch the inside of your thighs while you are pedaling. And the back of the saddle should be wide enough to support your sit bones. And the padding should be deep enough and of such density that you generally don't bottom out when hitting minor bumps. Most people find their own favorite saddle and many people can only ride one type. I have never ridden the Brooks saddles because of their weight but very many people love them. They used to have a rather long break-in period but apparently the modern ones are ready from the dealer.

    There is one thing you must look out for - every saddle is an individual. The exact width, length and depth is slightly different from saddle to saddle in every model so you can't just buy another one "like" the one you tried and liked. I have five saddles of one model from a manufacturer. One is the greatest saddle I've ever used. Three are pretty good and one is most horrible thing possible. It has a slightly rounder top and the padding doesn't even seem like padding. Though in my experience the newer saddles are, in general, more accurately designed and executed.

    Perhaps more importantly on a ride of that length is your clothing. The one thing that will lead to sores or even blisters faster than anything else is sweat being held against the skin and clothing causing friction in those areas.

    Padded shorts or tights are a virtual necessity and you have to wash them often so that they don't become soaked with sweat and become bacteria ridden. Over your thousand mile rides padded shorts will make all the difference. Perhaps not in how sore you get which is more a choice of saddle but by preventing infected sores.
     
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  5. Rock Creek Rider

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    I suffered with saddle problems for a number of years and put a lot of money and thought into finding a solution.
    My first suggestion would be to look at things other than the saddle. How your bike is set-up is a big factor. First off, level your saddle. I put a board on top and then a level on top of that. Make sure the bike is on flat ground. Then try moving the saddle forward or using a shorter stem. Or raise the bars, so you aren't bent over so much. Then you might try lowering the seat a quarter inch. And I use a chamois cream, but I don't put it on my pad, I put it on me wherever I feel rubbing, mostly on either side of my junk.
    I like the Evolve saddle that came with my Trek X-caliber so much I bought a second one. I don't like saddles that dip in the middle. I like them pretty flat from front to back. And I don't like saddles with a sharp crown. I don't like saddles that don't have sides to them. A lot of the superlight saddles look like they were cut out of a one inch board. I like a little indent for the prostate. I know people swear by Brooks, but I find them uncomfortable unless you are in a really upright position. The nose is just too darn hard.
     
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  6. yannshukor

    yannshukor New Member

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    Having tested the Drakon, I finally settled on the Selle SMP Well
     
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