Long distant cycling with dog (?)

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by L H, Jun 3, 2003.

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  1. L H

    L H Guest

    Anyone ever take a dog with them while touring on bike? If so how did you do it and how did it work?
    =A0 Any tips or advice appreciated. Thanx and bless.
     
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  2. Kyler Laird

    Kyler Laird Guest

    [email protected] (L H) writes:

    >Anyone ever take a dog with them while touring on bike?

    I just go short distances, using my bike instead of renting a car. Usually I just have one or two
    dogs, http://lairds.org/Kyler/photos/disk0022/img_1304.jpg/image_viewer
    http://lairds.org/Kyler/photos/disk0023/img_1466.jpg/image_viewer but for really short trips
    sometimes I take the whole crew. http://lairds.org/Kyler/photos/disk0022/img_1351.jpg/image_viewer

    >If so how did you do it and how did it work?

    I biked a lot many years ago but decided to start up again awhile ago. I have dogs now, so I needed
    a way for them to go with me. I chose a Burley Cub trailer because it has a rigid floorpan. The dogs
    seem comfortable in it.

    It worked well for my purposes. It's faster than walking and I can haul a lot. I sure wouldn't win
    any races though.

    > Any tips or advice appreciated.

    Take a test ride. Keep trips "short" and don't expect to go as fast as you usually do.

    I use sledding harnesses to tether the dogs to the trailer. A standard chest harness and a short
    lead should work too.

    Have fun!

    --kyler
     
  3. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    I rode part of Bike South 2000 on which a lady towed a kid for the entire 2000 miles. True, a kid is
    not a dog but neither was this one a child.

    "L H" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    Anyone ever take a dog with them while touring on bike? If so how did you do it and how did it work?
    Any tips or advice appreciated. Thanx and bless.
     
  4. Alan Walker

    Alan Walker Guest

    Vege [email protected] (L H) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Anyone ever take a dog with them while touring on bike? If so how did you do it and how did it
    > work? Any tips or advice appreciated. Thanx and bless.

    I have known two people who have done this.

    1. Someone who rode almost around Australia with a middle size dog in a trailer.

    2. A friend took a fox terrier with him just about everywhere, from multi-day camping tours to trips
    to the local shop. The dog sat in a box on top of the rear carrier. On occasions dogs would chase
    my friend, on the grounds that all cyclists ought to be barked at and have their ankles nipped.
    These dogs were sometimes surprised and confounded to encounter a tail-gunner who barked and
    nipped well above her fighting weight.

    In both cases, I was staggered that the owner was willing to carry so much extra weight, not only in
    dog but in dog food.

    If you already have a dog you want to take with you, I probably don't need to tell you anything
    about getting the dog accustomed to the idea first.
     
  5. Carol Cohen

    Carol Cohen Guest

    How about choosing to have a pet sled dog with you, and make it pull the bike? :)

    C.C.

    > From: [email protected] (Alan Walker) Organization: http://groups.google.com/ Newsgroups:
    > rec.bicycles.rides Date: 4 Jun 2003 13:47:50 -0700 Subject: Re: Long distant cycling with dog (?)
    >
    > Vege [email protected] (L H) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]awson.webtv.net>...
    >> Anyone ever take a dog with them while touring on bike? If so how did you do it and how did it
    >> work? Any tips or advice appreciated. Thanx and bless.
    >
    > I have known two people who have done this.
    >
    > 1. Someone who rode almost around Australia with a middle size dog in a trailer.
    >
    > 2. A friend took a fox terrier with him just about everywhere, from multi-day camping tours to
    > trips to the local shop. The dog sat in a box on top of the rear carrier. On occasions dogs
    > would chase my friend, on the grounds that all cyclists ought to be barked at and have their
    > ankles nipped. These dogs were sometimes surprised and confounded to encounter a tail-gunner
    > who barked and nipped well above her fighting weight.
    >
    > In both cases, I was staggered that the owner was willing to carry so much extra weight, not only
    > in dog but in dog food.
    >
    > If you already have a dog you want to take with you, I probably don't need to tell you anything
    > about getting the dog accustomed to the idea first.
     
  6. L H

    L H Guest

    Great pics. But,I was curious about long distance cycling. Although it does give me some ideas. I am
    mostly worried about the comfort and care of a dog on such a trip. I dont own one yet but it will be
    a small one. like 8 lbs or less. I am thinking about having some sort of roof for sun and rain
    protection.
     
  7. Alan Walker

    Alan Walker Guest

    Carol Cohen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<BB03E720.4CD60%[email protected]>...
    > How about choosing to have a pet sled dog with you, and make it pull the bike? :)

    Yes, I often used to tell him to get a Malamute, but he maintained that the difficulty of carrying
    half a calf to feed it more than outweighed its pulling power.
     
  8. [email protected] (Alan Walker) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]m>...

    > >
    > 2. A friend took a fox terrier with him just about everywhere, from multi-day camping tours to
    > trips to the local shop. The dog sat in a box on top of the rear carrier. On occasions dogs
    > would chase my friend, on the grounds that all cyclists ought to be barked at and have their
    > ankles nipped. These dogs were sometimes surprised and confounded to encounter a tail-gunner
    > who barked and nipped well above her fighting weight.
    >
    >
    I'm curious - did he stop to let loose the "dog of war," or did she learn to hit the
    ground running?

    I was thinking about towing a covered trailer with a Rottweiller I could release to discourage
    pursuing dogs, but I'm not sure this would be practical.

    btw If you have dog(s) attached somehow to your bike, don't they tend to lunge at joggers, cats,
    and other playthings as you cycle past ?
     
  9. Dan Gillette

    Dan Gillette Guest

    I met a couple touring with a dog years ago. The dog was around 50 pounds. One them pulled the dog
    in a chidren's trailer. The cool part was that they taught the dog to jump out on uphills and run
    alongside the bike.

    - Dan
     
  10. Fred Roses

    Fred Roses Guest

  11. On 5 Jun 2003 06:02:00 -0700 in rec.bicycles.rides, [email protected] (Alan Walker) wrote:

    > Yes, I often used to tell him to get a Malamute, but he maintained that the difficulty of carrying
    > half a calf to feed it more than outweighed its pulling power.

    they eat fish. dried salmon, boiled.
     
  12. Kyler Laird

    Kyler Laird Guest

    [email protected] (mark freedman) writes:

    > btw If you have dog(s) attached somehow to your bike, don't they tend to lunge at joggers, cats,
    > and other playthings as you cycle past ?

    Tend? Maybe, but as with most things, it's a matter of training. It does require extra management.
    There are also devices to help with this. http://bcf.usc.edu/~thaase/DOT/bicycle.html

    I've quite happily biked around San Carlos and San Mateo with one dog in the trailer and one pulling
    the trailer. I keep the dog on my right and watch for distractions. She's usually happy just running
    fast though, so as long as I keep up our speed she's less likely to be distracted.

    Before the trailer, I biked with the same dog running free in the ditch. She's quite accustomed to
    doing this on our farm, so it wasn't much of a stretch, but I wouldn't recommend it generally.

    --kyler
     
  13. Nobodyman

    Nobodyman Guest

    On 24 Jun 2003 01:51:03 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    > Anyone ever take a dog with them while touring on bike? If so how did
    >: you do it and how did it work?   Any tips or advice appreciated. Thanx and bless.

    How about somebody tying a collar/leash on you and hooking it up to their car, then dragging you
    along at a good clip faster than you would normally go for a lot longer than you would
    ordinarily go?

    Please be nice to you dog. If you are going long distances, maybe a trailer would be the way to go.
     
  14. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > L H <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : Anyone ever take a dog with them while touring on bike? If so how did you do it and how did it
    > : work? Any tips or advice appreciated. Thanx and bless.
    >
    > There is a solution: http://www.m5-ligfietsen.com/lowracer/th_greyhound.jpg

    Sicko.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
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