long runs: 15 mile rule

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Bear G, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. Bear G

    Bear G Guest

    At a marathon prep lecture last night Bobby McGee
    (www.bobbymcgee.com) mentioned a "15 mile rule." Basically you
    can do a training run up to 15 miles without special preparation
    or recovery and can run another 15 miles the next week without
    problem.

    Over 15 miles you need an explicit recovery period and another 15+
    run the following week is out.

    It sounded like time isn't a factor. Some people can do this in
    90 minutes and shouldn't run longer, others will take 3 hours and
    that's not a problem.
     
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  2. On 2004-09-25, Bear G <[email protected]> wrote:
    > At a marathon prep lecture last night Bobby McGee
    > (www.bobbymcgee.com) mentioned a "15 mile rule." Basically you
    > can do a training run up to 15 miles without special preparation
    > or recovery and can run another 15 miles the next week without
    > problem.
    >
    > Over 15 miles you need an explicit recovery period and another 15+
    > run the following week is out.
    >


    Looks like I'm a naughty boy, I usually do 16-18.

    Just like any other "rule", you can ignore it if you like.

    He's probably trying to make the point that if you're training for a
    marathon, you shouldn't necessarily do your 20-22 milers every week.

    > It sounded like time isn't a factor. Some people can do this in
    > 90 minutes and shouldn't run longer, others will take 3 hours and
    > that's not a problem.


    One of the problems with "rules" is that they also appear to implicitly
    grant permission. For example, the "10% rule" which says no more than a
    10% increase per week allows you to double your milage in 8 weeks.

    It's generally important to avoid interpreting guidelines as permission
    to do something dumb.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. Bear G

    Bear G Guest

    Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > Looks like I'm a naughty boy, I usually do 16-18.


    Every week?

    > He's probably trying to make the point that if you're training for a
    > marathon, you shouldn't necessarily do your 20-22 milers every week.


    Yes, and speaking to his audience. He knew there were a lot of
    first-time marathoners present who would like to maintain their
    fitness over the winter. I planned to follow something similar
    the BoulderFit schedule (e.g., 15-10-13-11-18, weather permitting)
    after recovery but people following other programs might be more
    aggressive.

    > One of the problems with "rules" is that they also appear to implicitly
    > grant permission. For example, the "10% rule" which says no more than a
    > 10% increase per week allows you to double your milage in 8 weeks.


    I went from 4 mile long runs to 13 in three months, injury free.
    But my weekday mileage held constant at 10-12 miles so the total
    mileage less than doubled. Even that was a... challenge.
     
  4. On 2004-09-25, Bear G <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    >> Looks like I'm a naughty boy, I usually do 16-18.

    >
    > Every week?


    Yeah. Sometimes I'll do 14 or 15, but I'd consider that on the short
    side. For me, 18 takes about 2:10, and 16 is under 2hrs.

    My rule of thumb is that a typical long run should be around 2hrs at most,
    but I don't sweat it if I'm a few minutes over that. I think the usual rule
    of thumb for long runs is 1.5-2hrs.

    The longest I go for is about 2:30 or so, with some of my marathon-training
    friends, but I only do about one of those beasts a month.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  5. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Bear G wrote:
    > At a marathon prep lecture last night Bobby McGee (www.bobbymcgee.com)
    > mentioned a "15 mile rule." Basically you can do a training run up to
    > 15 miles without special preparation or recovery and can run another 15
    > miles the next week without problem.
    >
    > Over 15 miles you need an explicit recovery period and another 15+ run
    > the following week is out.
    >
    > It sounded like time isn't a factor. Some people can do this in 90
    > minutes and shouldn't run longer, others will take 3 hours and that's
    > not a problem.


    Since it was in a "marathon prep" lecture, is it a correct assumption
    that it was oriented toward people that had gradually built up to 15
    mile long runs over months and may be doing 30+ mpw. For curiosity, what
    weekly mileage or time did this training pgm peak out at and how often?
    Just curious.

    Just in case a newbie reads this and thinks that this says it's ok to do
    a 14-mile run every week with no prep or recovery (which is the way I
    read it), regardless of your training and buildup, "listening to your
    body" may be a more general rule that might be a better guideline to
    avoid injury. Just a thought.

    Dot
    who likes the simple guidelines

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  6. Bear G

    Bear G Guest

    Dot wrote:
    > Since it was in a "marathon prep" lecture, is it a correct assumption
    > that it was oriented toward people that had gradually built up to 15
    > mile long runs over months and may be doing 30+ mpw. For curiosity, what
    > weekly mileage or time did this training pgm peak out at and how often?
    > Just curious.


    There were people from different programs there, and at least one
    guy who's run more than 10. BoulderFit/USA had weekly mileages in
    the high 20s for a slow runner like me. I think BBTC (which
    trains for both Boulder and CIM) is higher but I don't know by how
    much. As I've mentioned elsewhere USAFit is a program geared to
    take light runners to the next level, not one for serious runners
    looking to better their BQ times. It's also not uptight about the
    times - I usually ran about 20 minutes longer than the scheduled
    times.

    Most (all?) of our coaches have run Boston or are serious triathletes.

    > Just in case a newbie reads this and thinks that this says it's ok to do
    > a 14-mile run every week with no prep or recovery (which is the way I
    > read it), regardless of your training and buildup, "listening to your
    > body" may be a more general rule that might be a better guideline to
    > avoid injury. Just a thought.


    Definitely. I was following up to an earlier discussion on the
    length of long runs.
     
  7. rick++

    rick++ Guest

    As long as you've gradually worked up into it.
    Running 15 miles when longest run this year was 5 or 10 miles will
    make you very sore.
     
  8. Barf Bag

    Barf Bag Guest

    >As long as you've gradually worked up into it.
    >Running 15 miles when longest run this year was 5 or 10 miles will
    >make you very sore.


    No it'd make RR's idiotic moron Ricj sore, but it may not make you sore. Try it
    and see. Ignore the monkee.
     
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