long trip with 10 yr-old

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Ali, Apr 19, 2003.

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  1. Ali

    Ali Guest

    HI again, I posted re this a while back and had some v useful suggestions, thanks to all concerned.
    We're definitely going ahead with this, and I've obtined all relevant maps (Lincoln-Edinburgh via
    York,Tyneside) from Sustrans. I reckon on doing 30-35 miles /day in order not to wear him (or
    me.....) out too quickly. WE'll be camping / B&B-ing, though there seems to be a bit of a paucity of
    campsites adjacent to the route and we may rough it on the odd night depending on weather.OK, new
    request: equipment must-haves?comments on routes?All ideas gratefully received. Ali
     
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  2. Rik

    Rik Guest

    On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 20:30:11 -0000, "Ali" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > WE'll be camping / B&B-ing, though there seems to be a bit of a paucity of campsites adjacent to
    > the route and we may rough it on the odd night depending on weather.OK, new request: equipment
    > must-haves?comments on routes?All ideas gratefully received. Ali
    >
    Start making a list of equipment now so that as you think of things you can add them to the list. If
    you don't you'll inevitably forget something important. (I can let you have a copy of mine to start
    you off if you like). But only take stuff whicvh you are sure you'll need. Someone once said "before
    you go lay out all the stuff you'll definately need then discard half of it."

    It's surprising how quickly the weight can mount up so if you're buying new stuff make sure it's as
    light and bulk-freeas possible. This is especially true of the biger items such as tents and
    sleeping bags. Take the barest minimum of clothes and go for lightweight things that you can wear in
    layers if it gets cold. I don't know how you propose to distribute the weight between yourself and
    the 10 year old but when I go alone I limit myself to an absolute maximum of 20 kilos.

    My personal favourite bits of camping kit are a three quarter length Therorest sleeping mat (about
    50 quid a go but infinitely better than roll up sleeping mats and blow up jobs.) a LED head torch
    for easy reading at night and a compass which gets much more use than you might imagine.

    When loading paniers keep the heavier kit in the back ones which will help keep the bike stable. I
    use two panniers at the rear and two at the front. It's a good idea to make sure they have
    waterproof covers otherwise you should pack everything in plastic bags. Don't take so much that the
    panniers are completely stuffed as you'll find that you then have no room to carry food etc which
    you buy on the way.

    Avoid using rucksacks by carrying everything on the bike but it's a good idea to buy one of those
    lightweight day bags which fold down to the size of a pair of socks. You can use this for extra
    carrying space if it's really necessary.

    I also use a handlebar bag which clips on and off. Keep anything of value in this so that if you
    have to leave your bike with panniers still attached - for shopping etc - you can keep your
    valuables with you. Mine also has a clear map reading pocket on the top which is easier than
    stopping at every turning to extract your map from a pannier.

    Personally I wouldn't bother with campsite books (unless you tear out and carry only the relevant
    pages) but rely on the Ordnance Survey maps to locate camp sites.

    Hope this helps.

    RT
     
  3. Terry

    Terry Guest

    Take the barest minimum of clothes and go for lightweight things that you can wear in layers if it
    gets cold.

    I agree, BUT...

    Yesterday I got back from a hike and camp in the peak district with with my 15 and 13yo.I thought we
    were ready for a drop in temp as promised, but not for light drizzle, 20mph wind and 5 degrees that
    we got from evening on.In the middle of the hills with no more clothes to put on and inadequate tent
    and sleeping bags we were on the brink of real trouble. My fault of course. Thank goodness for a
    roll of BLACK BIN BAGS, which have saved my bacon on many occasions.And a handfull of rubber bands.

    I have woken up covered in snow in Corsica in April.It's worth having something in your bag for
    those times, though I appreciate it's a nuisance to carry it.

    TerryJ
     
  4. Rik

    Rik Guest

    On 20 Apr 2003 03:26:50 -0700, [email protected] (Terry) wrote:

    >I have woken up covered in snow in Corsica in April.It's worth having something in your bag for
    >those times, though I appreciate it's a nuisance to carry it.

    Yep, a roll of black bin liners is just the job! :)

    RT
     
  5. John B

    John B Guest

    Rik wrote:

    > On 20 Apr 2003 03:26:50 -0700, [email protected] (Terry) wrote:
    >
    > >I have woken up covered in snow in Corsica in April.It's worth having something in your bag for
    > >those times, though I appreciate it's a nuisance to carry it.
    >
    > Yep, a roll of black bin liners is just the job! :)
    >

    I've found a plastic decorators sheet (approx 12' square) to be one of the most useful items.
    Coincidentally it proved its worth also in Corsica when it became a tent on a couple of unexpectedly
    wet nights when sleeping out under the stars wasn't an option :-(

    John B
     
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