Longer stems

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by HyperPhreak, Apr 17, 2005.

  1. HyperPhreak

    HyperPhreak New Member

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    Whats the advantage of having a longer stem if there is one at all? i notice everyone i ride with have longer stems than i do but they are all smaller than me. I havent been riding that long so i dont know the ins and outs of equipment yet.
     
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  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Ya only need a longer stem to get proper reach to the bars of if your GF says so.
     
  3. HyperPhreak

    HyperPhreak New Member

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    how do you know if you have proper reach or not?
     
  4. e_guevara

    e_guevara New Member

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    It's a BIKE FIT issue...

    go to http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CCY?PAGE=FIT_CALCULATOR_INTRO and punch in your measurements. Competitive Cyclist gives three riding styles (road) which relate your position/measurements.

    OR

    http://www.wrenchscience.com/WS1/default.asp and click on the WS sizing system on the right-hand side of the page. Measurements can be for road or mountain.

    REMEMBER: these are empirical methods BASED ON THE RIDERS' MEASREMENTS. Bike fit is very SUBJECTIVE and ultimately it's how the rider (you) feels comfortable on the bike
     
  5. HyperPhreak

    HyperPhreak New Member

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    Thanks a lot.


     
  6. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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    Wait, let's first ask George. The longer/shorter stem allows for proper seat positioning. The first thing any pro does when fitting bike to rider is look at stem length, right? No wait, that's saddle position... sh&T no it's frame size... wait, no...
     
  7. biker7

    biker7 New Member

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    A stem is a metaphor for a phallus...why RC rides a bike with a short stem.
    Anything longer and RC is subconsciously reminded of his shortcoming.
    RC...I have to say, I would have to see your diploma before I would ever believe you were an engineer...lol. Must have been a community college.
    What's the integral of x dx?
    George
     
  8. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Gosh dang Georgie.... a fool and a prick! :rolleyes: you stuck your foot in your mouth. Enjoy the taste and live with it. :p
     
  9. el Ingles

    el Ingles New Member

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    On larger size frames the top tube does not increase at the same rate as the seat tube so you´ll often need a longer stem to compensate .
    BUT .. some people have longer than normal legs , some have a longer than normal backs - frames are sized for the normal and those of us that don´t conform have to use a shorter or ( as in my case ) a longer stem ( 130mm ) to compensate ( height 1,86 inside leg 83 cm )
     
  10. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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    Take a pill, sheesh. You're way too easily provoked. :D Calculus and diff EQ questions will make pontifications about stem length real fun won't they?
     
  11. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    I already suggested the pill.Apparently he ain't goin for it. Do they make one to help grow a thicker skin? ;)
     
  12. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    Let's not even go there...:) Back to the original question, the advantage to a longer stem is a more stretched out, aerodynamic possition. The big penalty however is an increase in the amount of body weight supported by your arms. Unlike most other sizing calculations, there aren't any hard and fast rules for determining stem length. Some of the geometric intangibles include how flexible you are, how the orientation of your lower back affects your pedal stroke, and how badly you've damaged your shoulders in wrecks. If you've got a stem that works for you, stick with it.
     
  13. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    George, all the math I studied didn't teach me a thing about proper stem length on a bike. But, I only went to public universities. I'm curious as to what schools you attended?

    Hey, don't get me wrong....degrees are great for resumes and intros at conferences. But if you ever feel the need to quote your educational background to win an arguement, my opinion is you've already lost it.
     
  14. psychlo

    psychlo New Member

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    hi hyper, am from manila. to get the proper reach, sit on the saddle and try to see if your handlebars are parallel to your front hubs, the bars should cover or hide the hubs from your line of sight, adjust seats if too forward or backward, that way your back does not strain much.
     
  15. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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    Ah yes, you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink... apparently Georgie's in a denial phase. That's OK: good entertainment value.
     
  16. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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    You can do this and you will have followed a rule of thumb that is as common as it is because it is a very simple one, and leads to ballbark results.

    But as mentioned, what if I'm a recreational rider with less athleticism and flexibility, what if I have back problems? A more upright upper body position would (all other bike size/fit issues being held constant ;) ) come from a combination of a longer and/or higher stem (i.e. longer steerer). When in question, a good LBS fitting tech will probably have your best answer. :)

    The question of 'adjusting your seat forward/rearward to compensate for seat-to-bar reach' has been beaten to death in another post: it is not the right thing to do (seat should be positioned over pedals on a correctly-sized bike). I don't think George bought into that one yet tho'...
     
  17. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    No sheot. 30 years in a science based industry and I knew plenty of people with advanced degrees that couldn't pour whizzzzz out of a boot. ;)
     
  18. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Nonsensse. You don't jack with seat for and aft to get proper reach to the bars.Unless you are a fool or Georgie. :p ;)
     
  19. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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    You'd think... but Georgie knows differential equations. Surely backed by an exceptional educational pedigree. Now I'm starting to second guess the collective knowledge of every other person in the bicyling world who thought they knew a thing or two on fitting... hmmm. ;)
     
  20. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    Too bad a differential equation will only help you size a stem if the bars are accelerating relative to the rest of the bike. For those of us who aren't in the middle of a catastrophic failure, this might be of some help:

    http://www.habcycles.com/fitting.html
     
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