Longest scientific study yet backs Atkins diet

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Diarmid Logan, May 18, 2004.

  1. http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99995003

    Longest scientific study yet backs Atkins diet

    12:21 18 May 04

    NewScientist.com news service

    The claimed benefits of the controversial low-carbohydrate
    Atkins diet have been reaffirmed in two new studies, one of
    which is the longest study to date.

    "I think it's good news for Atkins dieters," says Linda
    Stern, who led the first study of 132 obese patients at the
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia, US.

    The diet was devised by the late US doctor Robert Atkins. To
    lose weight, devotees avoid carbohydrates and consume more
    protein and fat instead.

    Both new studies found that subjects on the Atkins diet shed
    significant amounts of weight without harmful effects on
    blood fats and sugars. But the studies have failed to
    silence critics of the diet, who want the US government to
    investigate alleged adverse effects.

    Stern's year-long study (Annals of Internal Medicine, vol
    140, p778) was twice the length of any previous study. Half
    the patients followed the Atkins regime, limiting daily
    carbohydrate intake to just 30 grams. The rest tried losing
    weight through a conventional low-fat diet much richer in
    carbohydrates.

    By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount of
    weight, between five and eight kilograms for the Atkins
    group and three and eight kilos for the low fat group. But
    the Atkins dieters lost almost all their weight in the first
    six months, then remained at a steady weight.

    Stern says that this pattern of rapid weight loss matches
    that seen in an earlier but shorter study of Atkins dieters,
    by Gary Foster's team at the University of Pennsylvania in
    May 2003. "I'm impressed that they didn't gain it all back,"
    says Stern.

    Compared with the low-fat group, Atkins dieters also had
    lower levels of triglycerides, potentially harmful blood
    sugars which can trigger heart disease. Concentrations of
    beneficial high density cholesterols (HDLs) also held up
    better in the Atkins group. And these favourable changes
    remained till the end of the study, suggesting that there
    might be lasting benefits.

    "But what we really need is a study showing whether people
    on the low-carbohydrate diet for years have different odds
    of heart attacks, strokes and diabetes," she says.

    A second, six-month study on 120 overweight patients at
    Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina,
    echoes the first, with low-carbohydrate dieters shedding an
    average of 12 kilos, twice that lost by those on a low-fat
    regime (Annals of Internal Medicine, vol 140, p769). And
    the pattern of blood fats and sugars mirrored that in
    Stern's study.

    "Over six months, the diet appears to be relatively safe,
    but we need to study the safety for longer durations," says
    Will Yancy, head of the Duke team.

    But critics highlight some negative findings from the Duke
    study. "This new evidence confirms that levels of 'bad'
    cholesterol worsen in a substantial number of low-
    carbohydrate dieters," said Neal Barnard of the Physicians
    Committee for Responsible Medicine, a vegan lobby group in
    Washington DC.

    "And the supposedly dramatic benefits of the diet do not
    hold up over the long term," said Barnard, referring to the
    end of weight loss after six months in the Stern study.

    Although broadly supportive of the Atkins regime, Yancy
    warns that the diet could pose risks including the
    higher "bad" cholesterol, bone loss and kidney stones.
    Because of this, he discourages first-time dieters from
    using the regime.

    Andy Coghlan

    ****************************************

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3722221.stm

    Scientists endorse Atkins diet

    Following a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet is a more
    effective way to lose weight than following a low fat diet,
    say US researchers.

    Two studies published in the journal Annals of Internal
    Medicine found weight loss was greatest when people followed
    an Atkins-style diet.

    Cholesterol levels also seemed to improve more on a low-carb
    diet compared to a low-fat diet.

    However, the research was funded by the Robert C Atkins
    Foundation.

    And critics say there are still serious doubts about the long-
    term effect on health of adopting such diets.

    In the first study, researchers at Duke University Medical
    Center in Durham, North Carolina, assigned 120 obese
    volunteers to either a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet
    or a low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-calorie diet.

    After six months, the people on the Atkins-style diet had
    lost an average of 26 pounds, compared to an average of 14
    pounds in the conventional low-fat diet group.

    The low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet also had a good
    effect on fat levels.

    The Atkins dieters lost more body fat, lowered their
    triglyceride levels and raised their "good" HDL cholesterol
    levels more than the low-fat dieters.

    In the second study, researchers at the Veterans Affairs
    Medical Center in Philadelphia followed 132 obese adults
    who were randomised to either low-carbohydrate or low-fat
    diet groups.

    Again, after six months the people following the low-
    carbohydrate diet lost the most weight and had improved
    fat levels.

    However, at 12 months both groups had lost similar amounts
    of weight.

    The low fat group had continued to lose weight from six to
    12 months while the average weight in the low-carbohydrate
    group had remained steady after six months.

    Lead author of the Philadelphia study Dr Linda Stern said:
    "I think a low-carbohydrate diet is a good choice because
    much of our overeating has to do with consumption of too
    many carbohydrates."

    But she said more research was needed to see if a low-
    carbohydrate diet remained safe and effective over the
    longer term.

    In an accompanying editorial, Dr Walter Willett, from the
    Harvard School of Public Health in the US, said: "We can no
    longer dismiss very-low-carbohydrate diets."

    But he added that such diets should include healthy sources
    of protein and fat and incorporate regular exercise.

    "Patients should focus on finding ways to eat that they can
    maintain indefinitely rather than seeking diets that promote
    rapid weight loss," he said.

    Dr David Haslam, chairman of the National Obesity Forum,
    said: "There is no doubt that if low-carbohydrate, high-
    protein diets are followed properly you will lose weight.

    "What's always been questioned is the long term efficacy of
    such diets and in the short term, with weight loss, there
    are certain risks in certain patients - like patients with
    renal problems."

    "There's still no long term data about the efficacy and you
    can't stick on that type of diet for long because it's
    unpalatable," he said.

    Dr Haslam called for more research spanning five to six
    years rather than months.

    He said the best diet was still a healthy, balanced diet
    cutting out excessive fat.

    "One thing the Atkins isn't is balanced. It's not what the
    body expects and that's why we don't know the long term
    changes," he said.

    Dietzmina Govindji, of the British Dietetic Association,
    also warned people against thinking Atkins, or other similar
    diets, were the best way to lose weight.

    She said: "Do not be sucked in by the cabbage soup diet and
    other fad diets.

    "The thing to remember about all these quick-fix diets is
    they do help you lose weight very, very quickly but often
    you will put it back on very, very quickly and they often
    miss out on whole food groups, so you are not getting the
    full range of vitamins and minerals you need."
     
    Tags:


  2. Evelyn Ruut

    Evelyn Ruut Guest

    "Diarmid Logan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99995003

    > Compared with the low-fat group, Atkins dieters also had
    > lower levels of triglycerides, potentially harmful blood
    > sugars which can trigger heart disease. Concentrations of
    > beneficial high density cholesterols (HDLs) also held up
    > better in the Atkins group. And these favourable changes
    > remained till the end of the study, suggesting that there
    > might be lasting benefits.

    > Andy Coghlan

    Andy I saw this on the news today (and last night), where
    they covered this subject.

    Thanks for posting this here.

    It reflects my own experience as well.

    --
    Regards, Evelyn

    (to reply to me personally, remove 'sox")
     
  3. Crafting Mom

    Crafting Mom Guest

    Can't comment on the article, but one would think that
    people who are educated to become writers of articles would
    know what a "regime" is and what a "regimen" is.

    Diarmid Logan wrote:

    > http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99995003
    >
    > Longest scientific study yet backs Atkins diet
    >
    > 12:21 18 May 04
    >
    > NewScientist.com news service
    >
    > The claimed benefits of the controversial low-carbohydrate
    > Atkins diet have been reaffirmed in two new studies, one
    > of which is the longest study to date.
    >
    > "I think it's good news for Atkins dieters," says Linda
    > Stern, who led the first study of 132 obese patients at
    > the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia, US.
    >
    > The diet was devised by the late US doctor Robert Atkins.
    > To lose weight, devotees avoid carbohydrates and consume
    > more protein and fat instead.
    >
    > Both new studies found that subjects on the Atkins diet
    > shed significant amounts of weight without harmful effects
    > on blood fats and sugars. But the studies have failed to
    > silence critics of the diet, who want the US government to
    > investigate alleged adverse effects.
    >
    > Stern's year-long study (Annals of Internal Medicine, vol
    > 140, p778) was twice the length of any previous study.
    > Half the patients followed the Atkins regime, limiting
    > daily carbohydrate intake to just 30 grams. The rest tried
    > losing weight through a conventional low-fat diet much
    > richer in carbohydrates.
    >
    > By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount of
    > weight, between five and eight kilograms for the Atkins
    > group and three and eight kilos for the low fat group. But
    > the Atkins dieters lost almost all their weight in the
    > first six months, then remained at a steady weight.
    >
    > Stern says that this pattern of rapid weight loss matches
    > that seen in an earlier but shorter study of Atkins
    > dieters, by Gary Foster's team at the University of
    > Pennsylvania in May 2003. "I'm impressed that they didn't
    > gain it all back," says Stern.
    >
    > Compared with the low-fat group, Atkins dieters also had
    > lower levels of triglycerides, potentially harmful blood
    > sugars which can trigger heart disease. Concentrations of
    > beneficial high density cholesterols (HDLs) also held up
    > better in the Atkins group. And these favourable changes
    > remained till the end of the study, suggesting that there
    > might be lasting benefits.
    >
    > "But what we really need is a study showing whether people
    > on the low-carbohydrate diet for years have different odds
    > of heart attacks, strokes and diabetes," she says.
    >
    > A second, six-month study on 120 overweight patients at
    > Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina,
    > echoes the first, with low-carbohydrate dieters shedding
    > an average of 12 kilos, twice that lost by those on a low-
    > fat regime (Annals of Internal Medicine, vol 140, p769).
    > And the pattern of blood fats and sugars mirrored that in
    > Stern's study.
    >
    > "Over six months, the diet appears to be relatively safe,
    > but we need to study the safety for longer durations,"
    > says Will Yancy, head of the Duke team.
    >
    > But critics highlight some negative findings from the Duke
    > study. "This new evidence confirms that levels of 'bad'
    > cholesterol worsen in a substantial number of low-
    > carbohydrate dieters," said Neal Barnard of the Physicians
    > Committee for Responsible Medicine, a vegan lobby group in
    > Washington DC.
    >
    > "And the supposedly dramatic benefits of the diet do
    > not hold up over the long term," said Barnard,
    > referring to the end of weight loss after six months in
    > the Stern study.
    >
    > Although broadly supportive of the Atkins regime, Yancy
    > warns that the diet could pose risks including the
    > higher "bad" cholesterol, bone loss and kidney stones.
    > Because of this, he discourages first-time dieters from
    > using the regime.
    >
    > Andy Coghlan
    >
    > ****************************************
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3722221.stm
    >
    > Scientists endorse Atkins diet
    >
    > Following a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet is a more
    > effective way to lose weight than following a low fat
    > diet, say US researchers.
    >
    > Two studies published in the journal Annals of Internal
    > Medicine found weight loss was greatest when people
    > followed an Atkins-style diet.
    >
    > Cholesterol levels also seemed to improve more on a low-
    > carb diet compared to a low-fat diet.
    >
    > However, the research was funded by the Robert C Atkins
    > Foundation.
    >
    > And critics say there are still serious doubts about the
    > long-term effect on health of adopting such diets.
    >
    > In the first study, researchers at Duke University Medical
    > Center in Durham, North Carolina, assigned 120 obese
    > volunteers to either a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet
    > or a low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-calorie diet.
    >
    > After six months, the people on the Atkins-style diet had
    > lost an average of 26 pounds, compared to an average of 14
    > pounds in the conventional low-fat diet group.
    >
    > The low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet also had a good
    > effect on fat levels.
    >
    > The Atkins dieters lost more body fat, lowered their
    > triglyceride levels and raised their "good" HDL
    > cholesterol levels more than the low-fat dieters.
    >
    > In the second study, researchers at the Veterans Affairs
    > Medical Center in Philadelphia followed 132 obese adults
    > who were randomised to either low-carbohydrate or low-fat
    > diet groups.
    >
    > Again, after six months the people following the low-
    > carbohydrate diet lost the most weight and had improved
    > fat levels.
    >
    > However, at 12 months both groups had lost similar amounts
    > of weight.
    >
    > The low fat group had continued to lose weight from six to
    > 12 months while the average weight in the low-carbohydrate
    > group had remained steady after six months.
    >
    > Lead author of the Philadelphia study Dr Linda Stern said:
    > "I think a low-carbohydrate diet is a good choice because
    > much of our overeating has to do with consumption of too
    > many carbohydrates."
    >
    > But she said more research was needed to see if a low-
    > carbohydrate diet remained safe and effective over the
    > longer term.
    >
    > In an accompanying editorial, Dr Walter Willett, from the
    > Harvard School of Public Health in the US, said: "We can
    > no longer dismiss very-low-carbohydrate diets."
    >
    > But he added that such diets should include healthy
    > sources of protein and fat and incorporate regular
    > exercise.
    >
    > "Patients should focus on finding ways to eat that they
    > can maintain indefinitely rather than seeking diets that
    > promote rapid weight loss," he said.
    >
    > Dr David Haslam, chairman of the National Obesity Forum,
    > said: "There is no doubt that if low-carbohydrate, high-
    > protein diets are followed properly you will lose weight.
    >
    > "What's always been questioned is the long term efficacy
    > of such diets and in the short term, with weight loss,
    > there are certain risks in certain patients - like
    > patients with renal problems."
    >
    > "There's still no long term data about the efficacy and
    > you can't stick on that type of diet for long because it's
    > unpalatable," he said.
    >
    > Dr Haslam called for more research spanning five to six
    > years rather than months.
    >
    > He said the best diet was still a healthy, balanced diet
    > cutting out excessive fat.
    >
    > "One thing the Atkins isn't is balanced. It's not what the
    > body expects and that's why we don't know the long term
    > changes," he said.
    >
    > Dietzmina Govindji, of the British Dietetic Association,
    > also warned people against thinking Atkins, or other
    > similar diets, were the best way to lose weight.
    >
    > She said: "Do not be sucked in by the cabbage soup diet
    > and other fad diets.
    >
    > "The thing to remember about all these quick-fix diets is
    > they do help you lose weight very, very quickly but often
    > you will put it back on very, very quickly and they often
    > miss out on whole food groups, so you are not getting the
    > full range of vitamins and minerals you need."

    --
    The post you just read, unless otherwise noted, is strictly
    my opinion and experience. Please interpret accordingly.
     
  4. Evelyn Ruut

    Evelyn Ruut Guest

    "Crafting Mom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Can't comment on the article, but one would think that
    > people who are educated to become writers of articles
    > would know what a "regime" is and what a "regimen" is.

    Probably a typo.... losing that last letter "n"
    --
    Regards, Evelyn

    (to reply to me personally, remove 'sox")

    >
    > Diarmid Logan wrote:
    >
    > > http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99995003
    > >
    > > Longest scientific study yet backs Atkins diet
    > >
    > > 12:21 18 May 04
    > >
    > > NewScientist.com news service
    > >
    > > The claimed benefits of the controversial low-
    > > carbohydrate Atkins diet have been reaffirmed in two new
    > > studies, one of which is the longest study to date.
    > >
    > > "I think it's good news for Atkins dieters," says Linda
    > > Stern, who led the first study of 132 obese patients at
    > > the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia, US.
    > >
    > > The diet was devised by the late US doctor Robert
    > > Atkins. To lose weight, devotees avoid carbohydrates and
    > > consume more protein and fat instead.
    > >
    > > Both new studies found that subjects on the Atkins diet
    > > shed significant amounts of weight without harmful
    > > effects on blood fats and sugars. But the studies have
    > > failed to silence critics of the diet, who want the US
    > > government to investigate alleged adverse effects.
    > >
    > > Stern's year-long study (Annals of Internal Medicine,
    > > vol 140, p778) was twice the length of any previous
    > > study. Half the patients followed the Atkins regime,
    > > limiting daily carbohydrate intake to just 30 grams. The
    > > rest tried losing weight through a conventional low-fat
    > > diet much richer in carbohydrates.
    > >
    > > By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount
    > > of weight, between five and eight kilograms for the
    > > Atkins group and three and eight kilos for the low fat
    > > group. But the Atkins dieters lost almost all their
    > > weight in the first six months, then remained at a
    > > steady weight.
    > >
    > > Stern says that this pattern of rapid weight loss
    > > matches that seen in an earlier but shorter study of
    > > Atkins dieters, by Gary Foster's team at the University
    > > of Pennsylvania in May 2003. "I'm impressed that they
    > > didn't gain it all back," says Stern.
    > >
    > > Compared with the low-fat group, Atkins dieters also had
    > > lower levels of triglycerides, potentially harmful blood
    > > sugars which can trigger heart disease. Concentrations
    > > of beneficial high density cholesterols (HDLs) also held
    > > up better in the Atkins group. And these favourable
    > > changes remained till the end of the study, suggesting
    > > that there might be lasting benefits.
    > >
    > > "But what we really need is a study showing whether
    > > people on the low-carbohydrate diet for years have
    > > different odds of heart attacks, strokes and diabetes,"
    > > she says.
    > >
    > > A second, six-month study on 120 overweight patients at
    > > Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North
    > > Carolina, echoes the first, with low-carbohydrate
    > > dieters shedding an average of 12 kilos, twice that lost
    > > by those on a low-fat regime (Annals of Internal
    > > Medicine, vol 140, p769). And the pattern of blood fats
    > > and sugars mirrored that in Stern's study.
    > >
    > > "Over six months, the diet appears to be relatively
    > > safe, but we need to study the safety for longer
    > > durations," says Will Yancy, head of the Duke team.
    > >
    > > But critics highlight some negative findings from the
    > > Duke study. "This new evidence confirms that levels of
    > > 'bad' cholesterol worsen in a substantial number of low-
    > > carbohydrate dieters," said Neal Barnard of the
    > > Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a vegan
    > > lobby group in Washington DC.
    > >
    > > "And the supposedly dramatic benefits of the diet do not
    > > hold up over the long term," said Barnard, referring to
    > > the end of weight loss after six months in the Stern
    > > study.
    > >
    > > Although broadly supportive of the Atkins regime, Yancy
    > > warns that the diet could pose risks including the
    > > higher "bad" cholesterol, bone loss and kidney stones.
    > > Because of this, he discourages first-time dieters from
    > > using the regime.
    > >
    > > Andy Coghlan
    > >
    > > ****************************************
    > >
    > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3722221.stm
    > >
    > > Scientists endorse Atkins diet
    > >
    > > Following a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet is a
    > > more effective way to lose weight than following a low
    > > fat diet, say US researchers.
    > >
    > > Two studies published in the journal Annals of Internal
    > > Medicine found weight loss was greatest when people
    > > followed an Atkins-style diet.
    > >
    > > Cholesterol levels also seemed to improve more on a low-
    > > carb diet compared to a low-fat diet.
    > >
    > > However, the research was funded by the Robert C Atkins
    > > Foundation.
    > >
    > > And critics say there are still serious doubts about the
    > > long-term effect on health of adopting such diets.
    > >
    > > In the first study, researchers at Duke University
    > > Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, assigned 120
    > > obese volunteers to either a low-carbohydrate, high-
    > > protein diet or a low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-
    > > calorie diet.
    > >
    > > After six months, the people on the Atkins-style diet
    > > had lost an average of 26 pounds, compared to an average
    > > of 14 pounds in the conventional low-fat diet group.
    > >
    > > The low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet also had a good
    > > effect on fat levels.
    > >
    > > The Atkins dieters lost more body fat, lowered their
    > > triglyceride levels and raised their "good" HDL
    > > cholesterol levels more than the low-fat dieters.
    > >
    > > In the second study, researchers at the Veterans Affairs
    > > Medical Center in Philadelphia followed 132 obese adults
    > > who were randomised to either low-carbohydrate or low-
    > > fat diet groups.
    > >
    > > Again, after six months the people following the low-
    > > carbohydrate diet lost the most weight and had improved
    > > fat levels.
    > >
    > > However, at 12 months both groups had lost similar
    > > amounts of weight.
    > >
    > > The low fat group had continued to lose weight from six
    > > to 12 months while the average weight in the low-
    > > carbohydrate group had remained steady after six months.
    > >
    > > Lead author of the Philadelphia study Dr Linda Stern
    > > said: "I think a low-carbohydrate diet is a good choice
    > > because much of our overeating has to do with
    > > consumption of too many carbohydrates."
    > >
    > > But she said more research was needed to see if a low-
    > > carbohydrate diet remained safe and effective over the
    > > longer term.
    > >
    > > In an accompanying editorial, Dr Walter Willett, from
    > > the Harvard School of Public Health in the US, said: "We
    > > can no longer dismiss very-low-carbohydrate diets."
    > >
    > > But he added that such diets should include healthy
    > > sources of protein and fat and incorporate regular
    > > exercise.
    > >
    > > "Patients should focus on finding ways to eat that they
    > > can maintain indefinitely rather than seeking diets that
    > > promote rapid weight loss," he said.
    > >
    > > Dr David Haslam, chairman of the National Obesity Forum,
    > > said: "There is no doubt that if low-carbohydrate, high-
    > > protein diets are followed properly you will lose
    > > weight.
    > >
    > > "What's always been questioned is the long term efficacy
    > > of such diets and in the short term, with weight loss,
    > > there are certain risks in certain patients - like
    > > patients with renal problems."
    > >
    > > "There's still no long term data about the efficacy and
    > > you can't stick on that type of diet for long because
    > > it's unpalatable," he said.
    > >
    > > Dr Haslam called for more research spanning five to six
    > > years rather than months.
    > >
    > > He said the best diet was still a healthy, balanced diet
    > > cutting out excessive fat.
    > >
    > > "One thing the Atkins isn't is balanced. It's not what
    > > the body expects and that's why we don't know the long
    > > term changes," he said.
    > >
    > > Dietzmina Govindji, of the British Dietetic Association,
    > > also warned people against thinking Atkins, or other
    > > similar diets, were the best way to lose weight.
    > >
    > > She said: "Do not be sucked in by the cabbage soup diet
    > > and other fad diets.
    > >
    > > "The thing to remember about all these quick-fix diets
    > > is they do help you lose weight very, very quickly but
    > > often you will put it back on very, very quickly and
    > > they often miss out on whole food groups, so you are not
    > > getting the full range of vitamins and minerals you
    > > need."
    >
    > --
    > The post you just read, unless otherwise noted, is
    > strictly my opinion and experience. Please interpret
    > accordingly.
     
  5. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Tue, 18 May 2004 10:53:37 -0300 in article
    <[email protected]> Crafting Mom
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Can't comment on the article, but one would think that
    >people who are educated to become writers of articles would
    >know what a "regime" is and what a "regimen" is.
    >
    Actually, according to

    <URL:http://dictionary.reference.com>

    which uses as its source _The American Heritage® Dictionary
    of the English Language, Fourth Edition_, regime" and
    "regimen" are synonyms (in the context used in the articles
    you are referring to):

    "re·gime also ré·gime
    n.

    [..]

    4. A regulated system, as of diet and exercise; a
    regimen."

    The medical dictionary at <URL:http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/>
    is bit more restrictive allowing the meaning implied in the
    articles only for the word "regimen".

    --
    Matti Narkia
     
  6. Doug Lerner

    Doug Lerner Guest

    On 5/18/04 10:44 PM, in article
    [email protected], "Diarmid Logan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount of
    > weight, between five and eight kilograms for the Atkins
    > group and three and eight kilos for the low fat group. But
    > the Atkins dieters lost almost all their weight in the
    > first six months, then remained at a steady weight.

    Which is precisely the PROBLEM I had with Atkins. After six
    months I entered a six month stall, and have only broken
    that stall by switching to a low-calorie diet.

    doug
     
  7. In article <BCD0501F.40395%[email protected]>, Doug Lerner wrote:
    > On 5/18/04 10:44 PM, in article
    > [email protected], "Diarmid
    > Logan" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount of
    >> weight, between five and eight kilograms for the Atkins
    >> group and three and eight kilos for the low fat group.
    >> But the Atkins dieters lost almost all their weight in
    >> the first six months, then remained at a steady weight.
    >
    > Which is precisely the PROBLEM I had with Atkins. After
    > six months I entered a six month stall, and have only
    > broken that stall by switching to a low-calorie diet.

    The upside of this is that it probably means you are in a
    better state of health, metabolically, than those who keep
    losing and losing on
    LC. It is just a "hunch".

    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------
    char*p="char*p=%c%s%c;main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}";main(){pr-
    intf(p,34,p,34);} "It's never too late to have a happy
    childhood."
     
  8. In article <BCD0501F.40395%[email protected]>, Doug Lerner wrote:
    > On 5/18/04 10:44 PM, in article
    > [email protected], "Diarmid
    > Logan" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount of
    >> weight, between five and eight kilograms for the Atkins
    >> group and three and eight kilos for the low fat group.
    >> But the Atkins dieters lost almost all their weight in
    >> the first six months, then remained at a steady weight.
    >
    > Which is precisely the PROBLEM I had with Atkins. After
    > six months I entered a six month stall, and have only
    > broken that stall by switching to a low-calorie diet.

    The upside of this is that it probably means you are in a
    better state of health, metabolically, than those who keep
    losing and losing on
    LC. It is just a "hunch".

    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------
    char*p="char*p=%c%s%c;main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}";main(){pr-
    intf(p,34,p,34);} "It's never too late to have a happy
    childhood."
     
  9. Bob In Ct

    Bob In Ct Guest

    On Tue, 18 May 2004 23:43:27 +0900, Doug Lerner <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 5/18/04 10:44 PM, in article
    > [email protected], "Diarmid
    > Logan" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount of
    >> weight, between five and eight kilograms for the Atkins
    >> group and three and eight kilos for the low fat group.
    >> But the Atkins dieters lost almost all their weight in
    >> the first six months, then remained at a steady weight.
    >
    > Which is precisely the PROBLEM I had with Atkins. After
    > six months I entered a six month stall, and have only
    > broken that stall by switching to a low-calorie diet.
    >
    > doug
    >

    Did you increase your carbohydrate intake, as required by
    Atkins, during this period? Did you find your critical
    carbohydrate level for losing? What most people do is keep
    eating at 20-30 grams of carbs per day, which is not what
    Atkins advocates. Did you exercise? Also, calories are
    always important, regardless of what "diet" you follow.

    --
    Bob in CT Remove ".x" to reply
     
  10. Mirek Fidler

    Mirek Fidler Guest

    "Diarmid Logan" <[email protected]> píse v diskusním príspevku
    news:[email protected]...
    > http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99995003

    > was twice the length of any previous study. Half the
    > patients followed the Atkins regime, limiting daily
    > carbohydrate intake to just 30 grams.

    Ooops. Limiting carbs intake to 30 grams is NOT Atkins
    regime.

    These are induction levels and you are not supposed to be so
    low for more then couple of weeks, most prefferable 14 days
    only. Certainly not for one year.

    > Compared with the low-fat group, Atkins dieters also had
    > lower levels of triglycerides, potentially harmful blood
    > sugars which can trigger heart disease. Concentrations of
    > beneficial high density cholesterols (HDLs) also held up
    > better in the Atkins group. And these favourable changes
    > remained till the end of the study, suggesting that there
    > might be lasting benefits.

    One might ask what lipid results the study would gave if
    Atkins (or more generall LC approach) was really followed,
    raising maintainance carbs levels to 80-120g with vegetable
    and fruit sources.

    > But critics highlight some negative findings from the Duke
    > study. "This new evidence confirms that levels of 'bad'
    > cholesterol worsen in a substantial number of low-
    > carbohydrate dieters," said Neal Barnard of the Physicians
    > Committee for Responsible Medicine, a vegan lobby group in
    > Washington DC.

    Yeah, sure. Chicken meat is unhealthy because there is no
    vitamin C in
    it.

    Mirek
     
  11. Gman99

    Gman99 Guest

  12. Gman99

    Gman99 Guest

  13. Evelyn Ruut

    Evelyn Ruut Guest

    "Bob in CT" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...

    > Did you increase your carbohydrate intake, as required by
    > Atkins, during this period? Did you find your critical
    > carbohydrate level for losing? What most people do is keep
    > eating at 20-30 grams of carbs per day, which is not what
    > Atkins advocates. Did you exercise? Also, calories are
    > always important, regardless of what "diet" you follow.
    >
    > --
    > Bob in CT Remove ".x" to reply

    Very good points, which also reflect my own experience. I
    lost a certain amount of weight then stalled, and I wasn't
    too meticulous about watching those things (above) and I was
    lazy about exercise too. I think some sort of a modified
    version will evolve that may be best for me. Maybe South
    Beach or something..... and the exercise of course.
    --
    Regards, Evelyn

    (to reply to me personally, remove 'sox")
     
  14. Evelyn Ruut

    Evelyn Ruut Guest

    "Bob in CT" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...

    > Did you increase your carbohydrate intake, as required by
    > Atkins, during this period? Did you find your critical
    > carbohydrate level for losing? What most people do is keep
    > eating at 20-30 grams of carbs per day, which is not what
    > Atkins advocates. Did you exercise? Also, calories are
    > always important, regardless of what "diet" you follow.
    >
    > --
    > Bob in CT Remove ".x" to reply

    Very good points, which also reflect my own experience. I
    lost a certain amount of weight then stalled, and I wasn't
    too meticulous about watching those things (above) and I was
    lazy about exercise too. I think some sort of a modified
    version will evolve that may be best for me. Maybe South
    Beach or something..... and the exercise of course.
    --
    Regards, Evelyn

    (to reply to me personally, remove 'sox")
     
  15. Peanutjake

    Peanutjake Guest

    "Doug Lerner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BCD0501F.40395%[email protected]...
    > On 5/18/04 10:44 PM, in article
    > [email protected], "Diarmid
    > Logan" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount
    > > of weight, between five and eight kilograms for the
    > > Atkins group and three and eight kilos for the low fat
    > > group. But the Atkins dieters lost almost all their
    > > weight in the first six months, then remained at a
    > > steady weight.
    >
    > Which is precisely the PROBLEM I had with Atkins. After
    > six months I entered a six month stall, and have only
    > broken that stall by switching to a low-calorie diet.
    >
    > doug
    >

    So maybe that is the secret for losing weight. Go on Atkins
    for 6 months then switch to a lower calorie diet.

    But my question is what is the effect of each type of diet
    on a diabetic?

    PJ
     
  16. Jackie Patti

    Jackie Patti Guest

    gman99 wrote:

    > A year long study with 132 people does NOT a true trial
    > make...six months is nothing....

    Feel free to fund a larger long-term study.

    --
    As you accelerate your food, it takes exponentially more and
    more energy to increase its velocity, until you hit a limit
    at C. This energy has to come from somewhere; in this case,
    from the food's nutritional value. Thus, the faster the food
    is, the worse it gets. -- Mark Hughes, comprehending the
    taste of fast food
     
  17. Jackie Patti

    Jackie Patti Guest

    Peanutjake wrote:

    > But my question is what is the effect of each type of diet
    > on a diabetic?

    The second study showed significantly better glycemic
    control on low-carb.

    Which seems frankly so damned obvious to me that it seems
    ridiculous to need a study.

    People with impaired carbohydrate metabolism should limit
    carbs! Surprise!

    Blond moments in science...

    --
    As you accelerate your food, it takes exponentially more and
    more energy to increase its velocity, until you hit a limit
    at C. This energy has to come from somewhere; in this case,
    from the food's nutritional value. Thus, the faster the food
    is, the worse it gets. -- Mark Hughes, comprehending the
    taste of fast food
     
  18. gman99 wrote:

    > [email protected] (Diarmid Logan) wrote:
    > > http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99995003
    > >
    > > Longest scientific study yet backs Atkins diet
    > >
    > A year long study with 132 people does NOT a true trial
    > make...six months is nothing....

    Correct.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  19. gman99 wrote:

    > [email protected] (Diarmid Logan) wrote:
    > > http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99995003
    > >
    > > Longest scientific study yet backs Atkins diet
    > >
    > A year long study with 132 people does NOT a true trial
    > make...six months is nothing....

    Correct.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  20. Doug Lerner wrote:

    > On 5/18/04 10:44 PM, in article
    > [email protected], "Diarmid
    > Logan" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > By the end, both groups had lost about the same amount
    > > of weight, between five and eight kilograms for the
    > > Atkins group and three and eight kilos for the low fat
    > > group. But the Atkins dieters lost almost all their
    > > weight in the first six months, then remained at a
    > > steady weight.
    >
    > Which is precisely the PROBLEM I had with Atkins. After
    > six months I entered a six month stall, and have only
    > broken that stall by switching to a low-calorie diet.
    >
    > doug

    No switching is required with the 2PD approach which can be
    dovetailed with reduced carbs if you choose.

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp

    Would suggest you ask your doctor about it.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
Loading...