LOOK 585 ELLE Optimum frameset size XS...new

Discussion in 'Road Bikes' started by bodid, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. bodid

    bodid New Member

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    I bought this frame from a local dealer who was planning to build it up for herself, but she decided to sell the store. The 585 was discontinued. The company moved to monocoque Asian frames. This frame was made in France with an FSA integrated headset. This frame was never put on the road.

    950.

    More pictures & Geo...
    http://s269.photobucket.com/user/aidenmartine/library/LOOK%20585
     
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  2. dominic222

    dominic222 New Member

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    Hi,

    Wondering if this is still available? if so, will you ship to Australia?

    Cheers,
    Dominic
     
  3. bodid

    bodid New Member

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    Yes, it's still available. I can ship to Australia, sure.

    Jeff
     
  4. neodiasnook

    neodiasnook New Member

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    MIT Anthropologist Stefan Helmreich wins Rachel Carson Prize for "Alien Ocean" Presented by the Society for the Social Study of Science Stefan Helmreich's much-admired book "Alien Ocean, Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas" (University of California Press,
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    2009), has won the 2012 Rachel Carson Book Prize, given by the Society for the Social Study of Science to recognize a work of special social or political relevance in science and technology studies. Helmreich, a professor of anthropology, has received two earlier significant prizes for "Alien Ocean": the 2010 Gregory Bateson Book Prize, awarded by the Society of Cultural Anthropology, and the 2010 Senior Book Prize from the American Ethnological Society. Presenting the award at the ceremony in
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    Copenhagen, Javier Lezaun said, "This is a book that leads us into an alien world in the company of the scientists who research microbial life forms, and of all those who place their hopes in the hidden riches of the sea. This is a book that will change the way you think about nature and ecology; an anthropological study that reads, at times, like science fiction. Please join me in congratulating Stefan for this achievement." Full story at MIT SHASS News A giant trout once believed to be extinct is again delighting anglers at Pyramid Lake in Nevada after an intense federal and tribal effort to restore it. Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki warned on Thursday that the growing sectarian conflict in Iraq could lead to a civil war like the one raging in Syria. • Alleged incident happened in city centre pub on Wednesday• Witness says Henson lay unconscious for five minutesBath are investigating reports Gavin Henson was allegedly punched by a team-mate in a pub this week.
    It has been reported that the former Wales back, who joined
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    the club last month, was involved in an incident in the Pig and Fiddle in the city centre.The
    Premiership side said in a statement: "Bath Rugby can confirm there was a minor incident in the city centre on
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    Wednesday night involving a few members of the playing squad. The club are investigating the matter as a priority and will only make a statement when further information is available."According to the Bath Chronicle, Henson squared up to a team-mate who punched him so hard he lay unconscious on the floor until helped on to a chair.One witness said: "There were about 10 of them in the pub getting pissed but not being too rowdy. They seemed like they were all having a good time, apart from Henson who was strutting around like he owned the place.
    One of the other players told him to calm down and after a bit of a to-ing and fro-ing he just hit
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    him.
    He went out like a light for about five minutes. He just lay there like a lump, right on the floor."Avon and Somerset police has confirmed it received a call reporting "aggressive behaviour" that night but while the caller was on the line the group left the pub and so officers were not required to attend.
    No offences are being investigated.The Pig and Fiddle has declined to comment on the matter while Henson's representatives could not be contacted.Bath are Henson's fifth club in two years as the 31-year-old seeks to revive a career that promised much in his youth. The fly-half or centre has won two Six Nations grand slams but has not represented his country since winning the last of his 33 caps in 2011.Gavin
    HensonBathRugby unionguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions |
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    More Feeds The festival, called Next Weekend, will take place Aug. 8-11.
    The recommendation by the United States Preventive Services Task Force now aligns it with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Frugal travel along the Yangtze River, a dad can’t have it all either, answers to questions about paying for college and other
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    consumer-focused news from The New York Times. The NHL suspended Buffalo's Patrick Kaleta
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    for five games Monday, its stiffest punishment of
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    the season. The World Health Organization said in May that cellphone use could increase the risk of some types of brain tumors, Reuters reports. But this study didn't find a connection.
    By imposing multiple restrictions on the processes of writing, this group of French writers seek to find what literature might be, rather than what it isYou might think Raymond Queneau was guilty of a little overkill when he cured a bout of writer's block by writing One Hundred Thousand Billion Poems, but this flipbook presentation of 10 sonnets did more than paper over a barren spell, it became the founding text of an experimental literary collective.The 14 lines on each page are printed on individual strips, so that every line can be replaced by the corresponding one in any of the other poems. By the author's reckoning, it would take someone 190,258,751 years to go through all possible combinations. Cent Mille Milliards de Poèmes is at once complete, always in the process of becoming (with a little help from the reader) and necessary (on its own combinatorial terms) – the signatures of the Ouvroir de Littérature Potentielle, or Potential Literature Workshop (OuLiPo) launched by Queneau and François Le Lionnais in 1960.The
    Oulipo replayed literary modernity in ludic mode. It was, inter alia, an attempt to reconcile CP Snow's two
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    cultures, an undertaking which was embodied by the workshop's co-founders: Queneau was a writer fascinated by science; Le Lionnais, a scientist fascinated by writing.
    In their own way, they were reprising the early Romantic trade miner "all art should become science, and all science art" (Friedrich Schlegel). Despite such lofty claims, the collective adopted a very pragmatic approach to fiction, which is rather unusual in France, where literature has preserved much of its mystique and creative writing programmes are almost unheard of. According to Daniel Levin Becker, Oulipians consider "literature in the conditional mood; not the imperative". They do not profess to know what literature should be, but attempt to uncover what it could be, either in theory or practice. In the early days, the emphasis was firmly on the former (i.e. "anoulipism" in Oulipospeak). When they were not scouring the great works of the past in
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    search of proto-Oulipian procedures, the group members were busy establishing a lineage
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    of "pre-emptive plagiarists" (Lewis Carroll, Raymond Roussel et al.). The invention and possible deployment of new writing constraints ("synthoulipism") soon became the main focal point, however, and under the aegis of Georges Perec (who joined in 1967) the production of ambitious new works took centre stage.Oulipians
    are into literary bondage. Their fetish is predicated on the notion that writing is always constrained by something, be it simply time or language itself.
    The solution, in their view, is not to try, quixotically, to abolish constraints, but to acknowledge their presence, and embrace them proactively. For Queneau, "Inspiration which consists in blind obedience to every impulse is in reality a sort of slavery". Italo Calvino (who was co-opted in 1973) concurred: "What Romantic terminology called genius or talent or inspiration or intuition is nothing other than finding the right road empirically". Choosing the "right road" from the outset, instead of stumbling upon it haphazardly, is the Oulipian way: once the Apollonian structure has been circumscribed, Dionysus can work his magic. "I set myself rules
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    in order to be totally free," as Perec put it, echoing Queneau's earlier definition of Oulipians as "rats who build the labyrinth from which they plan to escape".As
    Gabriel Josipovici argues in What Ever Happened to Modernism?, modern literature was forged out of a refusal to submit to external constraints, with the novel a "new form in which the individual could express himself precisely by throwing off the shackles that bound him to his fathers and to tradition". The flipside of this emancipation of the writer (or privatisation of writing) was, as Walter Benjamin pointed out, isolation. No longer the mouthpiece of the Muses or society, novelists could only derive legitimacy from themselves.
    "Going back to the world of genres is not an option, any more than is a return to the world of the ancien régime," writes Josipovici. The Oulipo escapes the Romantic cul-de-sac of unfettered imagination (or its Surrealist avatar, chance) by reintroducing external constraints, which are self-imposed.Whether
    or not constraints should be disclosed to the reader is a moot point. Harry Mathews refuses to do so, while Jacques Roubaud (another mathematician) argues that the constraint(s) should be the very subject matter of any truly Oulipian work.
    Some constraints are a trifle gimmicky, like Jacques Jouet's metro poems, or even Jean Lescure's N+7 procedure. Others are far more convincing, for example, Raymond Queneau's Exercises in Style in which the same anecdote is retold in 99 different ways. "The problem, when you see the constraint," Perec observed, is that you no longer see anything else. It is a testament to his prodigious talent that one of the first reviewers of A Void (1969) should have failed to notice that the novel does not contain the most common letter (e) in the French language. This lipogrammatic tour de force is particularly poignant because the missing e (pronounced "eux" – "them" – in French) refers to all those (including the author's parents) who went missing during the second world war.For
    Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe and Jean-Luc Nancy, the Romantic fragment "stands for itself and for that from which it has been detached," making it both finite and (theoretically) infinite. According to Lauren
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    Elkin and Scott Esposito, the Oulipian constraint serves a similar purpose: "The work which results may be 'complete' in itself, but it will also gesture at all the other work that could potentially be generated using that constraint". Exhaustion is the "necessary corollary" of potentiality, they continue. This is particularly true in
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    the case of Perec, who, like an agoraphobic miniaturist, focuses on manageable, bite-sized chunks of reality, which he then tries to shoehorn into his books. He claimed that his ambition in Life: A User's Manual (1978) was "to exhaust not the world" but "a constituted fragment of the world". An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris (1975) – his famous exploration of the "infra-ordinary" – involved spending three days on the Place Saint-Sulpice observing what happened when nothing happened.One
    could argue that the failure of the Oulipian project is Perec's major theme. In one of the dreams in La Boutique obscure – recently translated for the first time – Perec discovers an edition of A Void in which the banned letter e keeps recurring.
    In Life: A User's Manual, Bartlebooth dies clutching the last piece of a jigsaw puzzle, which turns out to be the wrong shape.
    The plot – based on an algorithm enabling the knight in a game of chess to touch every single square on the board once – enacts the novel's failure (there is a missing chapter corresponding to an unvisited basement).
    "The Winter Journey" (which Atlas Press is bringing out in a new edition) revolves around the discovery – and subsequent loss – of a book (the eponymous Winter Journey) proving that all the great modern poets were in fact plagiarists.
    Also, 53 Days – about an unfinished book ex girlfriend guru a writer who disappears – was left unfinished by Perec, when he disappeared in 1982.
    The most famous Oulipian ― himself a crossword constructor – knew that literature was an unsolvable puzzle.Some
    say that the Oulipo increasingly resembles a gathering of ageing cruciverbalists: it started off looking for "pre-emptive plagiarists" and is now largely concerned with archiving its glory days.
    In an age of N+7 Machines and ebooks, many of the Oulipo's algorithm-based experiments have lost their cutting edge.
    The recent revival of interest, in the English-speaking world, is due to translations of works by historic Oulipians, as well as Daniel Levin Becker's youthful transatlantic enthusiasm (he is the group's latest recruit).
    Perhaps it is a measure of the movement's success that these days some of the most interesting debates and experiments are taking place outside the narrow confines of the group.
    Take Multiples, for instance, which originated as a special issue of McSweeney's, edited by Adam Thirlwell, which Portobello is bringing out here next month.
    It is a typically Oulipian exercise in which 12 short stories are translated by 61 novelists into 18 different languages.
    Each story is translated into or out of English several times, until something new is found in translation.FictionPoetryAndrew Gallixguardian.co.uk

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    © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.
    | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds JERUSALEM — In a landmark ruling on the struggle over prayer at Judaism’s holiest shrine, an Israeli court
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    ruled Thursday that women could legally pray at the Western Wall wearing prayer shawls, contrary to Orthodox practice enforced at the site. Read full article >> In an effort to win more mainland customers, Net-a-Porter is adding a Chinese language site and opening a distribution center in Hong Kong to speed deliveries.
    Scientists waiting for the spacecraft to enter the wider reaches of the Milky Way are perplexed: Only one of two telltale signs of its departure has been detected. Microsoft has made
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    significant changes to Windows 8, making life for desktop users more like it used to be
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    on Windows 7 - while aiming to keep tablet users happyLast year Microsoft reimagined Windows. Windows 8 was released in October 2012, complete with a new touch-friendly personality intended to make the operating system work well on tablets as well as with keyboard and mouse.
    It was a bold but controversial experiment. Users have not found it easy to adjust to the Windows 8 Start screen, which replaced the Start menu in Windows 7, and the Windows 8 app market is weak compared to that for Apple or Android apps.
    "I installed Windows 8 two months ago.
    I have yet to use a Metro app for anything," said developer Robert Smallshire on Twitter, where "Metro" refers to the new tablet apps which Microsoft officially calls "Modern"
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    apps or Windows Store apps. Most Windows users still live in the traditional desktop environment, which is why many Windows 8 tablets are "hybrids", with keyboards and trackpads as well as touch screens.On Wednesday at its Build developer conference in San Francisco, Microsoft unveiled the preview of Windows 8.1, an update which refines the operating system without changing its character.
    I've been running the preview on the Surface Pro tablet given to all Build attendees. No retreatMicrosoft is not backtracking on concepts such as the Start screen or the "immersive UI" which presents Modern apps without the clutter of visible menus and toolbars. Yes, there is a Start button on the desktop - but it takes you to the Start screen rather than restoring the menu in Windows 7. The Start button will be a point of familiarity for new users, but its main benefit is the enhanced administrative menu (known as Win-X because of its keyboard shortcut) which pops up if you right-click, including an option to shut down.Users who want to avoid
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    Modern apps have other new options, offered if you right-click the taskbar and choose properties. Here you will find "boot to desktop", the ability to list desktop apps first in the Start screen when sorted by category, and an option to default to the "All
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    apps" view in Start. Unlike the mainly cosmetic Start button, these are significant changes. Engage them all, and when you tap Start you get a list of desktop apps grouped almost like the old menu, though it is not hierarchical.
    You can also show the desktop background in Start, making the transition to the Modern UI less jarring.The Start screen no longer shows all apps in the default tiled view,
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    but only apps you select. It is also easier to customise Start groups.
    A swipe down takes
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    you to the All apps view, unless you chose this as the default.Snapped to itMost of the changes in Windows 8.1 relate to Modern apps. In Windows 8.0,
    you can have up to two apps on view, with one snapped to the side.
    This snapped view has gone (a Microsoft engineer admitted to me that few people used it).
    If two apps are on view, you can now size them as you like by dragging a vertical bar, and if you have a large screen you can have up to four apps on view, though my Surface only accommodates two.
    Apps can also be written for two displays, with different data on each, so for example you could have a controller view and a presentation view.
    All good stuff.New searchThe way Search works has changed. Previously, if you invoked search by pressing Win-S or selecting it from the right-hand Charms menu, you would be taken automatically to vitiligo treatment screen.
    Now, search opens in a panel, and by default searches "Everywhere" rather than just Apps as before. One effect is that you can now easily open a new desktop app without
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    ever leaving the desktop environment, using search as an app launcher.
    On the other hand, if you are searching more generally, you get results in a new Bing app that combines local and web search in a rich view.
    A search for "guardian", for example, shows Word documents with that word in the title as well as matching websites. Search
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    for a celebrity and you get photos, biography, and for a musician, options to play songs in Xbox Music, the native music app on Windows 8.
    Each search creates a kind of custom app, Microsoft explained, and this feature is fun to use. The prize for Microsoft is greater Bing adoption if the approach proves popular.SkyDrive: now landingSkyDrive, Microsoft's cloud storage, is deeply embedded in Windows 8.1. It has its own section in PC Settings, and you can opt to save all documents to SkyDrive by default. Open Notepad, for example, type something, hit save, and it goes to SkyDrive if you do not change the location.
    Another SkyDrive change is that the Modern SkyDrive app now works offline, sharing local storage with the Desktop version. This makes
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    sense if you travel or regularly work on more than one machine.Talking of PC Settings, Window 8.1 has more settings in the Modern settings app, reducing the need to run the old Control Panel. It is still not comprehensive. Mouse settings, for example, has just three options in PC settings, with many more in Control Panel. This is an improvement though. PC Settings is also the place for new features like Workplace, which when combined with the forthcoming update to Windows Server will let users access a business network under the control of IT administrators, but without the full "domain join" that corporate machines normally require. This is in keeping with the Bring Your Own Device trend, where a machine is used both for home and business. Combined with another feature called work folders, this lets users synchronize with documents on their business network, while allowing the IT administrator to switch off access if the machine is lost or the employee leaves.Turning
    IE up to
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    11Windows 8.1 comes with version 11 of Internet Explorer (IE), which will also be available for Windows 7. The big new feature is WebGL (Web Graphics Library) support, a standard for showing 3D accelerated graphics in the browser without a plug-in, and ideal for browser-based games.
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    Previously Microsoft had resisted WebGL because of security concerns, which it says are now resolved thanks to improvements both in the standard and in IE itself.
    There is also better touch support and faster performance, though I have not noticed much difference in day to day browsing so far.
    The presence of two versions of IE in Windows 8 - one on the Start screen, one on the desktop - remains confusing.Fun
    in Store?The Windows Store has been revamped.
    The home
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    page is more appealing and magazine-like, categories are selected from the top menu rather than by endless scrolling, and apps now update automatically if you allow it.What about the built-in apps? A new recipe app has what looks like a brilliant feature, called Hands-Free mode.
    If your machine has a front-facing camera, you wave your hand to navigate pages, avoiding touching the screen with sticky fingers. Unfortunately this hardly works on my Surface, suggesting that Microsoft has more work to do here, or that it is fussy about the exact hardware you use.I
    had better luck with Reading List, essentially an app which lists shortcuts for future reference.
    Run Modern IE, for example, and you can add links to the Reading List using Share on the Charms menu. This also works with maps and other apps.Mailed
    itThe Mail app is slightly improved.
    When I tried to add my Exchange Server account, it actually told me why it was not working (a digital certificate issue), whereas the old Mail app used to fail with infuriating silence.
    You can also view web links
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    with an automatic side-by-side view,
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    making a better experience.The
    Photo app now has an Edit feature with a range of options for adjusting the colour, tint, light and various effects. It is easy to use and effective.ConclusionWindows
    8.1
    is a significant improvement. After just a short spell with the preview, I do not want to go back. The experience for desktop users (which is most users most of the time) is smoother, and there are many small enhancements which combine make a big difference, of which I have mentioned only a few.But
    is it enough to fix the poor reputation of Windows 8, to persuade users sticking with Windows 7 to upgrade, or even to win sales that would otherwise go to iPad or Android
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    tablets? Redmonk analyst James Governor is optimistic. "It's a long game," he told me.
    "You remember Vista, which needed a significant refactoring, and what came out of it was a decent platform. The Bing integration is significant. The split personality is a problem, but Metro is beautiful and a step forward, and will increasingly be the kind of model people use to access apps."All this chimes with me as a reviewer and early adopter; yet Microsoft is coming from behind in the tablet market, has many users reluctant to relearn how they work with Windows, and its hardware partners are creating largely hybrid devices that are expensive and compromised - though also more powerful - compared to their tablet rivals. Windows 8.1 is clickbank pirate review but doesn't remove these obstacles.I am writing this at Microsoft's developer conference, and the effort to win over developers to the new Modern platform is key.
    Just a few compelling apps will drive adoption; and it may even be that the new Bing app is one such in the way it combines local and web search in a single and appealing package.Overall, it is too early to call Windows 8.1 a success, but also too soon to call the Windows 8 project a failure. Microsoft had done good work, and those who disliked the first release may want to take another look. Preview: where to get itYou can get the preview at http://preview.windows.com, but be warned that there is no uninstall and it may not be possible to upgrade to the final version without a complete reinstall. In other words, it is not yet ready for general use.Rating: 4/5Windows 8MicrosoftMicrosoft Surfaceguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds After Hurricane Sandy wiped out nearly all the cars in Howard Beach, Queens, residents bought new ones and provided tire thieves inviting targets.
    “This Town,” by Mark Leibovich, the national political correspondent
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    for The New York Times Magazine, is a blistering look at the egos and machinations of Washington’s insider culture. The benchmark Dow Jones industrial average reached an all-time high Tuesday, underscoring the contrast between corporate America’s rapid recovery since the financial crisis and the rest of the country’s ongoing struggle to regain its footing. Read full article >> Peter T. Demos, a nuclear physicist who guided MIT’s Bates Linear Accelerator from a groundbreaking idea in 1961 to a globally renowned center for the study of nuclear structure and reactions, died of coronary artery disease on Sept.
    18. A longtime resident of Belmont, Mass.,
    Demos was 94.Demos was a “remarkable scientific leader,” said Robert Redwine, a
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    professor of physics at MIT and current
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    director of the Bates Center. “His excellent scientific taste, his unquestioned
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    integrity, and his determination to support every user of the laboratory were critical in establishing a style of operation that was a model for laboratories around the world.”The Bates Accelerator “opened up a huge new area of research in nuclear physics. We pioneered studies in high-resolution electron scattering and started a program in coincidence experiments,” said MIT physics professor Stanley Kowalski, Demos’ former student and faculty colleague.
    Demos and Kowalski worked with a team of MIT physicists to launch the Bates facility.Demos
    served as director of the Bates Center from 1973 to 1983. During its more-than-30-year life as an international center for the study of nuclear physics, scientists came from around the world to use the facility in Middleton, Mass.
    Before developing and directing Bates, Demos served as a leader in the design and construction of MIT’s first microwave linear accelerator, completed in 1951.
    During the 1960s, he was a trustee to the group of nine universities, including MIT, founded to operate the Brookhaven National Laboratory’s proton accelerator. “Those whose passion is to understand the basic nature of matter and energy are in Peter Demos’ debt,” John M. Deutch, Institute Professor of Chemistry and dean emeritus of the School of Science, noted when Demos retired as Bates director.
    “He gave us essential leadership — a remarkable national resource for physics research, a tool of inestimable value.”The Bates Center now provides critical technical support for MIT researchers and their collaborators in nuclear and particle physics experiments, and houses the largest MIT facility for high-performance computing.
    Bates staff members also collaborate on applications of accelerator technology to projects in medical physics and in homeland security.Demos’ legacy was honored when the Peter T. Demos Award was established to recognize a graduate student who demonstrates the “spirit, persistence and intellectual qualities” Demos embodied over his long career.  Research and a leap An expert in radiation and applications of radiation, Demos specialized in ballistics and radar studies before coming to MIT with his young family in 1946 as a research associate.
    He earned his PhD at the Institute in 1951 and joined the MIT physics faculty in 1957, becoming a full professor and director of the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS) in 1961.
    He served as LNS director until 1973.As director of LNS and Bates, Demos “pushed heaven and earth to get good ideas implemented.
    His efforts were very important toward having LNS recognized as a world leader in nuclear and particle physics,” said William Bertozzi, a professor of physics at MIT and and Demos’ first graduate student.Demos’
    early MIT work, concentrating on low-energy physics and photonuclear reactions, might have set him on a conventionally successful academic career.
    But he made a classic MIT leap: When an innovative, hands-on project arose — building one of the first linear accelerators, a 17-million-electron-volt machine — Demos twice set aside his doctoral research to get the room-sized device working.  At that time there were three accelerators on MIT’s campus — a synchrotron in Building 24, a cyclotron in Building 44 and the linear accelerator, or linac, that Demos and his team built in Building 20. “The linac made possible world-leading research,” Kowalski recalled.
    “It truly was an exciting time to do physics.”
    Demos’ example and his generosity helped harness those exciting times at MIT.
    His support was “crucial to success in experimental research. In his quiet but convincing style he helped open many doors of opportunity and recognition for the faculty and research staff,” Bertozzi said. “I shall miss his advice and counsel.”Not surprisingly, Demos advocated breadth in physics education and flexibility with young google sniper 2.0 download they grew, as
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    he did, through experience. A devoted mentor and educator, he once wrote that while he valued a “good undergraduate physics education and direct experience with good experimental work, I have learned the most from teaching others.”In recent years, Demos was interested
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    in energy issues as well as new techniques for cooling hadron beams at high energies. “He was a wise and regular contributor to informal discussions on energy in LNS in the years 2007 to 2010. With his LNS colleagues, he co-authored an article in the MIT Faculty Newsletter on nuclear energy in 2008,” noted Richard Milner, the current LNS director and a professor of physics. Demos was a member of the American Physical Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a former director of the advisory panel to the Center for Radiation Physics Division at the National Bureau of Standards.
    He also served as chair of the Committee on Radiation of the National Research Council.  
    A native of Toronto, Demos became a U.S. citizen in 1958.
    His wife of 62 years, Elizabeth (Betty) Jean, died in 2003.
    He is survived by his sons, Theodore of California and John of Maine; his daughter Ellen of Ireland; his sister Georgia Davies of Calgary, Alberta; six grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and many devoted Canadian and American nieces and nephews.Donations
    in Demos’ memory
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    can be made to Hospice of the Good Shepherd. Revisiting John Tierney’s 2002 article on trains in America.
    China is considering price control mechanisms and tightly regulated markets for its emissions trading schemes (ETS) in a bid to avoid the price volatility and scandals that have hit Europe's ETS, as surveys show the country has reached European per-capita emission levels.
    More ' LAS VEGAS - Tablets and smartphones took the spotlight at the Consumer Electronics Show on Thursday, with Motorola, Samsung and LG showering attendees with dozens of faster and more powerful devices that will reach consumer hands this year.
    I was touring a new home, and one of the features that really interested me was the central vacuum system.
    It seems like one of these would be really handy.
    What's involved when you install a central vacuum? Can you share some tips, especially what not to do? - Ray H.,
    Newtown, Pa. Former congressman and recently minted San Diego Mayor Bob Filner (D) admitted in a video late Thursday that he is seeking professional help for his treatment of women.
    Former Filner supporters said earlier Thursday that Filner had harassed women in the workplace and called on him to resign.
    Read full article >> Marshall says winds and eddies along the Southern Ocean drag deep waters — and any buried carbon — to the surface around Antarctica. He and Speer write that the updated diagram “brings the Southern Ocean to the forefront” of the global circulation system, highlighting its role as a powerful climate mediator.Indeed, Marshall and Speer review evidence that the Southern Ocean may have had a part in thawing the planet out of the last Ice Age. While it’s unclear what
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    caused Earth to warm initially, this warming may have driven surface wind patterns poleward, pulling up deep water and carbon — which would have been released into the atmosphere, further warming the climate.
    Shifting windsIn a cooling world, it appears that winds shift slightly closer to the Equator, and are buffeted by the continents. In a warming world, winds shift toward the poles; in the Southern Ocean, unimpeded winds whip up deep waters.
    The researchers note that two manmade atmospheric trends — ozone depletion and greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels — have a large effect on winds over the Southern Ocean: As the ozone hole recovers, greenhouse gases rise and the planet warms, winds over the Southern Ocean are likely to shift, affecting the delicate balance at play.
    In the future,
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    if the Southern Ocean experiences stronger winds displaced slightly south of their current position, Antarctica’s ice shelves may be more vulnerable to melting — a phenomenon that may also have contributed to the end of the Ice Age. 
    [​IMG]
    “There are huge reservoirs of carbon in the interior of the ocean,” Marshall says.
    “If the climate changes and makes it easier for that carbon to get into the atmosphere, then there will be an additional warming effect.”Jorge Sarmiento, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences at Princeton University, says the Southern Ocean has been a difficult area to study. To fully understand the Southern Ocean’s dynamics requires models with high resolution — a significant challenge, given the ocean’s size.“Because it’s so hard to observe the Southern Ocean, we’re still in the process of learning things,” says Sarmiento, who was not involved with this research. “So I think this is a very nice snapshot of our current understanding, based on models and observations, and it will sort of be a touchstone
    [​IMG]
    for
    [​IMG]
    future developments in the field.”Marshall and Speer are now working with a multi-institution team led by MIT’s collaborator, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, to measure how waters
    [​IMG]
    upwell in the Southern Ocean.
    The researchers are studying the flow driven by eddies in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and have deployed tracers and deep
    [​IMG]
    drifters to measure its effects; temperature, salinity and oxygen content in the water also help tell them how eddies behave, and how quickly or slowly warm water rises to the surface.“Any perturbation that is made to the atmosphere, whether it’s due to glacial cycles or ozone or greenhouse forcing, can change the balance over the Southern Ocean,” Marshall says.
    “We have to understand how the Southern Ocean works in the climate system and take that into
     
  5. Look585

    Look585 New Member

    Joined:
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    Hello Jeff

    I am very interested in this framework. Looking it in the world.
    Do you have it still? I am living in Switzerland. Would you consign him to Switzerland?
    Of course, I would suggest you pay the amount in advance.

    Best regards, Thomas
     
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