Look at the pic -- why are my hands going numb?

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Lindenin, Oct 27, 2007.

  1. Lindenin

    Lindenin New Member

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    Based on the attached pic, does anything jump out at you cycling experts as to why my wrists are getting sore and hands sometimes going numb? It it not terrible, but bad enough so I know I definately need to make an adjustment or two.

    Thanks in advance for any advice!
     
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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    You have your wrists bent, keep them straight, the nerves in the wrist joint will be pinched, do this for a long time and you will get carpal tunnel sydrome. Try to achieve a straight line from the elbow to the first joint in the finger.

    Your bars may be too wide.
     
  3. Eden

    Eden New Member

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    Do you tend to ride long distances out of your aerobars? Looks like you are set up with cow horns right now, which really aren't meant to be comfortable or ridden in for long periods. If you want to just use the aeros for varying your position and resting then having a pair of standard drop bars may suit you better.
     
  4. reub2000

    reub2000 New Member

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    I see a lot of people riding fixed gear bikes through the city with handle bars that look like that. I use a flatbar with a bar ends, so it's a similar position, and I find the bar ends more comfortable then the handlebar. And I tried a bike with a drop bar at the bike shop, and it hurt the area between my thumb and index finger.

    Anyways, I'd try lowering the angle of the handlebar. Right where the stem grabs onto the handlebar, loosen up the screws that hold the handlebar in place, and turn the handlebar so that the horns are pointing slightly up.
     
  5. fujibike

    fujibike New Member

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    It looks to me your arms are relatively rigid, i.e., not much bend at the elbow. I would then think the your upper body weight is directly place upon the wrist joint which then places pressure on the ulnar nerve. I've run into the same thing and made some seat adjustments as well as changing hand positions between drops, hoods and flats of the bar.


    [​IMG]
     
  6. RelevantAaron

    RelevantAaron New Member

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    I tend to ride with a pretty good bend in my arms - more core but less pressure on the wrists. No amount of Internet feedback replaces a trip to a good LBS for a proper fitting. But...It looks like you could use a bit more stem length.
     
  7. Xsmoker

    Xsmoker New Member

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    Bike looks kinda' small to me...
     
  8. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    Upper body weight being pressed over your carpel tunnel... Ouch!

    1) Better hand/wrist positions needed.
    2) Cycling gloves.
    ...
    n) Helmet? :p
     
  9. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    It looks like you're supporting your upper body with your arms and hands instead of using your core strength (back and abs). Try putting less weight on your hands.
     
  10. MJR

    MJR New Member

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    Exactly. Your bike is quite a bit too small for your body. Did you get sized properly when you bought this bike?
     
  11. Lindenin

    Lindenin New Member

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    Yep - was sized in two places, one of them staffed with hardcore bikers. I'm 6'1 and am on a 58cm. It is a Tri Bike, which you typically want to run just a bit smaller than a roadie.

    My fitting, however, was underwhelming. I got on the trainer and everything but was expecting more.

    I should add that since I had this experience, I've been using the aerobars more and haven't had hand problems. The issue is that in order to get to the open roads where I can go aero, I first have a bit of heavy city traffic, which I tend to ride on the bullhorns for.
     
  12. longfemur

    longfemur New Member

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    It's a tri bike, and as such, you probably are not weight-balanced on it the same as you would be on a well setup road bike. Too much weight forward of the pedals = too much weight on the hands unless you are riding like you would for a tri or short distances. Fine for triathlons, but not good for longer road riding unless it's a time trial.

    It's amazing what proper weight distribution on the bike will do.
     
  13. lehowe0

    lehowe0 New Member

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    I agree somewhat with most of these assessments.
    I think your top tube looks a bit short, (but if experts fitted you then who am I to argue), and I don't like the design of your handlebars.

    A set of drop bars would give you a variety of grip positions to keep you from having to ride with your wrists in one position all the time.

    I had a similar problem when I dropped over curbs and went through ruts in a jarring manner. Perhaps you are jarring your wrists too much in your riding? Try it without a lot of jarring activity for a day or two and see if that's part of the problem.
     
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