LOOK cleats broken off in <1000 miles.



R

Robb Monn

Guest
What am I doing wrong? I ride a fixed gear and last night I completely
snapped the lip off of my right cleat which led to a crash during which
I snapped the lip off the other cleat as well!!!?

Are my pedals not tight enough? Am I too strong? Are you not supposed
to pull hard on cleats?

What is the story.
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
>What am I doing wrong? I ride a fixed gear and last night I completely
>snapped the lip off of my right cleat which led to a crash during which
>I snapped the lip off the other cleat as well!!!?
>Are my pedals not tight enough? Am I too strong? Are you not supposed
>to pull hard on cleats?
>What is the story.


If by lip you mean the front tip of the cleat, then you wore it thin to
the point that it was too weak and broke. Look cleat wear depends on how
much walking you do on them. You will notice that the cleat that is on
the foot you put down at traffic lights will always wear faster than the
other cleat. You can rotate your cleats to get a little more wear out of
them. What you need to so is inspect your cleats regularly and when they
get thin, replace them.

There use to be a company that made look cleats out of aluminum and
they came with a lifetime guarantee, but I haven't seen them in quite some
time, so I am guessing they are no longer in business. So much for the life
time guarantee.
-------------
Alex
 
Z

Zog The Undeniable

Guest
Alex Rodriguez wrote:

> There use to be a company that made look cleats out of aluminum and
> they came with a lifetime guarantee, but I haven't seen them in quite some
> time, so I am guessing they are no longer in business. So much for the life
> time guarantee.


The cleats for Time Equipe pedals were aluminium at the front (and
ferro-bronze at the rear). Eventually Time changed to plastic at the
front because the alu ones scratched the pedals. The cleats are still
on sale.
 
F

Frank

Guest
When I was looking for a custom built frame, I narrowed it down to just a
couple of builders. Tom Teesdale was one of the two.

Tom told me he offered a lifetime guarantee on his frames, so I jokingly
asked for a complete set of his most recent medical records and family
background.

Tom was good natured about the request, and while I didn't get all that
information I did get a nicely made frameset that lasted until I sold it to
another rider who still rides it today.
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Robb Monn wrote:
> What am I doing wrong? I ride a fixed gear and last night I
> completely snapped the lip off of my right cleat which led to a crash
> during which I snapped the lip off the other cleat as well!!!?
>
> Are my pedals not tight enough? Am I too strong? Are you not
> supposed to pull hard on cleats?
>
> What is the story.


Hmmm. I just broke the REAR lip off my right Look cleat, which is the foot
I almost always put down at stops. In replacing it, I realized how worn and
thin it had become (prolly around 3,000 miles; I have two pairs of shoes so
not sure exactly).

My Look pedals crapped out (developed play) very quickly, so I'm using the
Performance brand of Ti/Mag pedals. (First pair of THOSE got play, too, but
warranty/replacement pair is holding up very well so far.) Kept the
original Look cleats on shoes, but now have installed the ones that came
with the Performance pedals. They're a good deal smaller than "true Looks",
and seem to click in/out a bit better on these particular pedals.

Bill "Look, don't gimme no lip" S.
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 12:58:46 -0500, "Frank"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>When I was looking for a custom built frame, I narrowed it down to just a
>couple of builders. Tom Teesdale was one of the two.
>
>Tom told me he offered a lifetime guarantee on his frames, so I jokingly
>asked for a complete set of his most recent medical records and family
>background.
>
>Tom was good natured about the request, and while I didn't get all that
>information I did get a nicely made frameset that lasted until I sold it to
>another rider who still rides it today.


Many years ago, in an auto parts industry newsletter, there was a
two-panel cartoon that had lifetime guarantees as its subject. In the
first panel, the irate customer is pounding on the counter, yelling
"But you said this part had a lifetime guarantee!" In the next panel,
all you can see of the customer is his legs and feet; the customer is
horizontal on the floor, and the parts guy is standing there with a
smoking gun, saying "You had to bring it up."

I will admit that there were times when the urge to honor a warranty
in this manner was strong...
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
P

Phil, Squid-in-Training

Guest
Bill Sornson wrote:

Hmm... No more "Sorni".

> Bill "Look, don't gimme no lip" S.


Yeah... now I'm just discombobulated.

Phil
 
R

Robb Monn

Guest
sorry. the rear of the cleat is what broke in both cases. And to
emphasize, less than 1000 miles and less than 4 months have passed
since I bought them.
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
> Bill Sornson wrote:
>
> Hmm... No more "Sorni".


Those pinko lefties were using my name anyway, so f^ck 'em! (May go back to
it if public pressure demands it :)

>> Bill "Look, don't gimme no lip" S.

>
> Yeah... now I'm just discombobulated.


And you'll like it.

Bill "how'd this end up in a cleat thread?" S.
 
Q

qtq

Guest
Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote in
news:p[email protected]:

> On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 12:58:46 -0500, "Frank"
> <[email protected]> wrote:


>>Tom told me he offered a lifetime guarantee on his frames, so I
>>jokingly asked for a complete set of his most recent medical records
>>and family background.> Many years ago, in an auto parts industry

newsletter, there was a
> two-panel cartoon that had lifetime guarantees as its subject. In the
> first panel, the irate customer is pounding on the counter, yelling
> "But you said this part had a lifetime guarantee!" In the next panel,
> all you can see of the customer is his legs and feet; the customer is
> horizontal on the floor, and the parts guy is standing there with a
> smoking gun, saying "You had to bring it up."


There are quite a few medical products which are guaranteed for the
lifetime of the patient. When such devices include aortic balloon pumps
(which assist a failing heart), one would think that there such a
guarantee is worthless.
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
says...

>There are quite a few medical products which are guaranteed for the
>lifetime of the patient. When such devices include aortic balloon pumps
>(which assist a failing heart), one would think that there such a
>guarantee is worthless.


Basically the lifetime of the part determines the lifetime of the patient.
-------------
Alex