Look PP396 Road Pedals versus Road Look A3.1 Pedals

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dario Wolfish, May 20, 2003.

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  1. Now that I have my new Trek 5200, I need to buy road pedals. I saw at an online store that the Look
    PP396 pedals are on sale for 100 dollars. The site claims that the retail price of these pedals is
    200 dollars.

    The Look A3.1 road pedals are also 100 dollars.

    What exactly is the difference between these pedals? Which of these pedals do you recommend?

    I have large feet (13 5E) and would like a simple and quick release.

    I am new to this cycling madness and would like your advice Please email me or post your
    opinion here.

    As always, thanks so much for your help.

    Sincerely,

    Dario
     
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  2. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    << Now that I have my new Trek 5200, I need to buy road pedals. I saw at an online store that the
    Look PP396 pedals are on sale for 100 dollars. The site claims that the retail price of these pedals
    is 200 dollars. The Look A3.1 road pedals are also 100 dollars. What exactly is the difference
    between these pedals? Which of these pedals do you recommend? >>

    The best LOOK pedals are the old Shimano PD-7401 (Dura Ace). They are all metal, and have a superior
    axle/bearing design. Long discontinued, but available occasionally on eBay, both NOS and used. The
    main difference between the various LOOK brand models, other than cosmetics, is the release tension
    and the gimmicks. The rotation adjustment dial on the back of the PP396 doesn't do much-that's a
    gimmick. Avoid it, and there's one less thing to break. Cconsider the release tension when choosing
    models. The lower end pedals have release tension settings from 8-12, and the "pro" pedals go from
    11 to 16. A powerful rider might need the higher settings in a sprint, while a novice might find it
    safer and easier to clip in and out at the low settings. You can find all this info on the Total
    Cycling site, which sells the PP396 for $65 and the
    A3.1 for $62 (plus shipping from the UK).

    http://www.totalcycling.com/
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Dario Wolfish wrote:
    > Now that I have my new Trek 5200, I need to buy road pedals. I saw at an online store that the
    > Look PP396 pedals are on sale for 100 dollars. The site claims that the retail price of these
    > pedals is 200 dollars.
    >
    > The Look A3.1 road pedals are also 100 dollars.
    >
    > What exactly is the difference between these pedals?

    The specs are at: http://www.lookcycle.com/english/catalogue/2003/pedales.htm

    Most importantly, the A3.1 does not have adjustable float. PP396 offers , 3, 6 or 9 degrees - so you
    can tune to what suits or get extra. You'll just get ~6 with A3.1 with red cleats (or zero with
    black). I use PP396 with the '9' setting which helps relax my ankles and knees.

    A3.1 tension range is lower - but the upper end is bound to be fine for most riders. Even the
    minimum retension-force setting of the PP396 might seem alarming at first but you'll quickly get
    used to it, and releasing will get easier as the cleats and pedals wear (and I don't mean when
    worn-out; just worn a bit). I manage them in central London (among other places), so if they're
    practical enough for that, they're practical enough for just about any road riding - if you're
    generally confident on a bike.

    I've not tried the A3.1 but one small improvement (in this and other new models) appears to be a
    better design of the surface where the little cleat rubber foot contacts the pedal. I find there
    sometimes can be excessive float-friction with the 396, especially when gunked up with dirt or
    grease (too much grease disoves the rubber!).

    > Which of these pedals do you recommend?

    PP396.

    > I have large feet (13 5E) and would like a simple and quick release.

    Size of feet is irrelevant to this choice, and both will release quickly and simply by turning heel
    outwards by a few degrees.

    ~PB
     
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