Looking at a recumbent

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by travisbutcher, Mar 24, 2004.

  1. travisbutcher

    travisbutcher New Member

    Joined:
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    Hi -
    I am looking at getting into the world of recumbents. My primary reason is due to a serious wrist/hand injury i incurred while riding my upright. I can not ride long distances with the weight on my wrist. I have a few questions I would like to pose to some experienced riders to get a sense if this is a good decision.

    1. My bike is my primary form of transportation and I use it for commuting (about 10 miles each way). I would like to know if recumbents easy to ride in traffic situtations?

    2. I am looking at several different brands right know and would like a few thoughts on Burley and Visions for a beginner.

    3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?

    Sorry for so many questions I just do not want to leap into a purchase I may regret.
    Travis Butcher
     
    Tags:


  2. "travisbutcher" <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in
    message...
    >
    > 3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?

    You will get run over at the first intersection you come to,
    bents can't be seen by truck drivers.

    Which isn't all that bad, you don't really want to be seen
    laying out in one of those, now do you?

    Get a nice carb road bike and you'll be set:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/sponsors/italia/2003/derosa/?id=-
    pics/TheKing SWEET!
     
  3. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <jJk8c.101778$Is1.80690@fe22.usenetserver.com>,
    usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com says...
    > Hi - I am looking at getting into the world of recumbents.
    > My primary reason is due to a serious wrist/hand injury i
    > incurred while riding my upright. I can not ride long
    > distances with the weight on my wrist. I have a few
    > questions I would like to pose to some experienced riders
    > to get a sense if this is a good decision.
    >
    > 1. My bike is my primary form of transportation and I use
    > it for commuting (about 10 miles each way). I would
    > like to know if recumbents easy to ride in traffic
    > situtations?

    I ride mine almost every work day. Sometimes on 6 lane
    streets in rush hour. I have commuted on a LWB RANS Stratus
    as well as the Bacchetta Giro and Lightning Voyager SWBs
    that I use now. I prefer the Over Seat Steering (OSS) and
    the Short Wheel Base (SWB). The SWBs are a little more
    nimble. The LWB are slower to get to cruising speed but can
    hold that cruising speed with a little less effort than the
    SWB. Recumbents are an unusual sight on busy streets, more
    so than conventional Diamond Frame (DF) bikes. As such, you
    will get more attention and usually a wider berth from other
    vehicular traffic.

    Recumbents offer the option of a pannier rack under the
    seat. This permits a more stable load which can be important
    for commuting.

    > 2. I am looking at several different brands right know
    > and would like a few thoughts on Burley and Visions
    > for a beginner.

    Vision is no longer in business, any Vision that you find in
    a LBS may be had at a bargain. OTOH, special parts (very
    few) and later resale may be a problem.

    Both Burley and Vision offer USS and OSS models. It is an
    interesting side note that most all the USS manufacturers in
    the US have gone out of business.

    Personally, I think I have better control of the bike with
    OSS.

    You might want to give yourself other options for recumbents
    suitable for commuting. Both RANS And Bacchetta make fine
    bikes very suitable for this purpose.
    > 3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?

    Bugs get in your teeth. Try not to grin as you ride.

    Actually, since recumbents allow you to keep your head up
    and see traffic, they are probably a little safer than a DF.

    >
    > Sorry for so many questions I just do not want to leap
    > into a purchase I may regret. Travis Butcher

    My Advice: You need to ask more questions and ride more and
    different recumbents.

    If you are planning to use your recumbent as a primary form
    of transportation, you will need to consider how and where
    you carry a load. There are very few recumbent specific
    racks for panniers. Most conventional racks can be adapted
    to many recumbents. But you need to be creative to stabilize
    the rack with a load. RANS makes a rear rack that fits their
    bikes and Bacchettas too. Burley makes an adapter kit that
    IMO is totally unsuitable because it places the load behind
    the rear axle.

    As I mentioned earlier, Bacchetta makes an underseat rack
    (MidShip) that works great for commuting. It only fits their
    padded Recurve Seat. RANS and EasyRacers also make an
    underseat rack. Arkel has recently introduced a recumbent
    specific pannier set that nest nicely behind the seat or
    under it. I just got these and also their Utility baskets. I
    will be using the Utility baskets tonight on my way home
    from work. These are the trips when it is useful to have
    rear and underseat racks. I carry my commuting gear in an
    Ortlieb Front Roller under the seat and have room for a
    weeks worth of groceries on the back.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager
    http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  4. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <8il8c.899299$ts4.56218@pd7tw3no>,
    chipomarc@lfdd.ca says...
    >
    > "travisbutcher" <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in
    > message...
    > >
    > > 3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?
    >
    > You will get run over at the first intersection you come
    > to, bents can't be seen by truck drivers.

    "...serious wrist/hand injury I incurred while riding
    my upright."

    I think the original poster has already determined which are
    more dangerous.

    (And to the original poster, Fabrizio is a well noted
    'poser' and can safely be ignored).
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager
    http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  5. PAgent

    PAgent New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
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    0
    I just made the leap and purchased my first recumbent. I did a lot of research on 'bents in general, and had a pretty good idea what I was interested in. I also didn't want to spend a small fortune on a bike before I knew it would work for me.

    I'm fortunate that I live near a bike shop that specializes in recumbents:

    Coventry Cycle

    I went to the shop a couple of times and test rode several 'bents. They are each very different, and all handle very differently from an upright. If you can ride different models, do so.

    I ended up getting a Burley Koosah. It was (relatively) inexpensive at $900. It is supposedly easy to learn on, and the long wheelbase made it comparatively stable, particularly at higher speeds. It really felt like a quality bike when I was on it, and I fell in love with it.

    I've been getting used to how it handles, particularly low speed maneuvers, and I have no regrets. This is an awesome bike. My hands don't hurt and go numb, my back and neck don't hurt, and my rear doesn't get sore. I am looking forward to many miles of pain-free riding.
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 18:47:43 GMT, travisbutcher
    <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in message
    <jJk8c.101778$Is1.80690@fe22.usenetserver.com>:

    >1. My bike is my primary form of transportation and I use
    > it for commuting (about 10 miles each way). I would
    > like to know if recumbents easy to ride in traffic
    > situtations?

    Tolerable. A more upright bike is easier when filtering, but
    a good low, fast bike can keep pace with the traffic better
    than a wedgie. And a trike is great, no need to unclip. I
    use a recumbent for commuting and find it marginally slower
    in traffic, but noly marginally.

    >3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?

    None. They are more visible due to scarcity value, and if
    you wipe out you hit the ground arse first, which is much
    better than head first. I have ridden a SWB low recumbent
    with slicks in snow and ice without crashing, and I have had
    two wipeouts where the bike went down and I stood up,
    receiving not even a slight bruise.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
    Washington University
     
  7. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    "travisbutcher" <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in message
    news:jJk8c.101778$Is1.80690@fe22.usenetserver.com...
    > Hi - I am looking at getting into the world of recumbents.
    > My primary reason is due to a serious wrist/hand injury i
    > incurred while riding my upright. I can not ride long
    > distances with the weight on my wrist. I have a few
    > questions I would like to pose to some experienced riders
    > to get a sense if this is a good decision.
    >
    > 1. My bike is my primary form of transportation and I use
    > it for commuting (about 10 miles each way). I would
    > like to know if recumbents easy to ride in traffic
    > situtations?
    >
    > 2. I am looking at several different brands right know
    > and would like a few thoughts on Burley and Visions
    > for a beginner.
    >
    > 3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?
    >
    > Sorry for so many questions I just do not want to leap
    > into a purchase I may regret. Travis Butcher

    Either Burley or Vision should be a good beginner bike, I
    started out with a Vision R50 with suspension and it worked
    very well for the 2300 miles I put on it.

    As far as safety concerns a recumbent isn't as stable as a
    standard bike in my opinion and the ability to look behind
    you is compromised by the design so invest heavily in
    mirrors. You will have a slight learning curve with them but
    once you get past that you won't want to ever ride on a
    standard bike again
     
  8. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <chipomarc@lfdd.ca> wrote in message
    news:8il8c.899299$ts4.56218@pd7tw3no...
    >
    > "travisbutcher" <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in
    > message...
    > >
    > > 3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?
    >
    > You will get run over at the first intersection you come
    > to, bents can't be seen by truck drivers.
    >
    > Which isn't all that bad, you don't really want to be seen
    > laying out in one of those, now do you?
    >
    > Get a nice carb road bike and you'll be set:
    >
    >
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/sponsors/italia/2003/derosa/?i-
    > d=pics/TheKing SWEET!

    Over 5,000 miles and never a problem troll
     
  9. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    "Cletus Lee" <Newsgrp@clee.org> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1acba06984ec7dc59899e8@News.Individual.NET...
    > In article <jJk8c.101778$Is1.80690@fe22.usenetserver.com>,
    usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com says...
    > > Hi - I am looking at getting into the world of
    > > recumbents. My primary reason is due to a serious
    > > wrist/hand injury i incurred while riding my upright. I
    > > can not ride long distances with the weight on my wrist.
    > > I have a few questions I would like to pose to some
    > > experienced riders to get a sense if this is a good
    > > decision.
    > >
    > > 1. My bike is my primary form of transportation and I
    > > use it for commuting (about 10 miles each way). I
    > > would like to know if recumbents easy to ride in
    > > traffic situtations?
    >
    > I ride mine almost every work day. Sometimes on 6 lane
    > streets in rush
    hour. I have commuted on a
    > LWB RANS Stratus as well as the Bacchetta Giro and
    > Lightning Voyager SWBs
    that I use now. I prefer
    > the Over Seat Steering (OSS) and the Short Wheel Base
    > (SWB). The SWBs are
    a little more nimble. The
    > LWB are slower to get to cruising speed but can hold that
    > cruising speed
    with a little less effort
    > than the SWB.

    Not that I doubt you but why is the LWB slower to get to
    cruising speed and require less effort once there? I've not
    found this to be true either way in my experience but my
    experience isn't as much as yours with the LWB's

    > Recumbents are an unusual sight on busy streets, more so
    > than conventional
    Diamond Frame (DF)
    > bikes. As such, you will get more attention and usually a
    > wider berth from
    other vehicular traffic.

    This is VERY true, especially when riding a Baron :)
     
  10. On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 13:46:59 -0600, Cletus Lee <Newsgrp@clee.org>
    wrote:

    >
    >(And to the original poster, Fabrizio is a well noted
    >'poser' and can safely be ignored).

    And a Hoser poser at that.

    --
    This post contains police language. Viewer nudity is advised.
     
  11. Howard

    Howard Guest

    travisbutcher <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in
    news:jJk8c.101778$Is1.80690@fe22.usenetserver.com:

    > 1. My bike is my primary form of transportation and I use
    > it for commuting (about 10 miles each way). I would
    > like to know if recumbents easy to ride in traffic
    > situtations?
    Several of us commute on them. I'm thinking, however, that
    the Sun EZ Sport seating position would be really hard to
    beat for in-town stuff. It's a little higher and more
    upright than most.
    >
    > 2. I am looking at several different brands right know
    > and would like a few thoughts on Burley and Visions
    > for a beginner.

    I've heard of people commuting on Hepcats, and others, but I
    haven't, so can't comment. I kind of like low feet for in
    town, but if I had fewer stops I might not. A long or
    medium/long wheelbase (EZ1/EZ Sport, Rans Tailwind, et al)
    also adapt well to fairings, which are really nice when the
    temps get below 30. Fairing attachments get pretty expensive
    for most SWB's. USS is great, but requires some hardware to
    mount lights etc.

    Again, I don't own one, but an EZ Sport seems like a really
    promising commuting bike. It takes fenders easily, a rack &
    seatbag OK, isn't too expensive, sits up well, seems well
    enough built, etc. The Burley Koosah/Jett Creek seem
    promising too.

    > 3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?
    Same as with anything else not built by AM General. Pretend
    you're invisible. I'm on a Stratus and find I'm at eye level
    with Subies and above that with Civics. Naturally, the
    minutes right after sunrise are bad to be on bikes,
    regardless of type.
     
  12. >1. My bike is my primary form of transportation and I use
    > it for commuting (about 10 miles each way). I would
    > like to know if recumbents easy to ride in traffic
    > situtations?
    >
    >3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?

    My bike is also my primary form of transportation. Half a
    year ago, I added a recumbent (LWB Tour Easy) to my set of
    bikes. Here are my perceptions comparing this bike with my
    diamond frame bikes:

    a) my recumbent is less stable on ice, though if it does
    slip, the impact of a fall is also less.
    b) visibility is very similar, just slightly lower on
    the recumbent
    c) a helmet mirror is more important, since more difficult
    to turn my head back to see traffic behind

    Overall, not a huge difference, but some small
    differences at least.

    --mev, Mike Vermeulen
     
  13. Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:
    > "travisbutcher" <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in
    > message...
    >>
    >> 3. What are safety concerns with a recumbent?
    >
    > You will get run over at the first intersection you come
    > to, bents can't be seen by truck drivers.
    >
    > Which isn't all that bad, you don't really want to be seen
    > laying out in one of those, now do you?
    >
    > Get a nice carb road bike and you'll be set:

    Were that the case, I should not have been riding them for
    twenty-one years, but then we can always rely on "Fabrizio"
    t ocome up with a statement which is Clearly Bollocks, can't
    we, boys and girls? Back in your box, laddie.

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  14. "Zippy the Pinhead" <the_corporate_hose@hotmail.com> wrote
    in message

    >
    > And a Hoser poser at that.

    I believe that my recent top ten placing in the Etollie de
    Besseges and the Laigueglia allow me the right to ask you to
    take back your last statement. Thanks.

    .
     
  15. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Mike Vermeulen wrote:

    > ...
    > a) my recumbent is less stable on ice, though if it does
    > slip, the impact of a fall is also less....

    Typically, most of the impact from falling on a recumbent
    will occur to the hip or buttocks, and possibly the elbow,
    as opposed to falling from an upright where shoulder and
    head impacts are more frequent.

    Hip and elbow pads could well be the most effective way to
    reduce injuries in recumbent falls.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)
     
  16. "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" wrote:

    > I believe that my recent top ten placing in the Etollie de
    > Besseges and the Laigueglia allow me the right to ask you
    > to take back your last statement. Thanks.

    I, on the other hand, believe that the fact that the top ten
    of the Etoile de Besseges reads like this:

    1. Laurent Brochard
    2. Sylvain Calzati
    3. Joseba Zubeldia
    4. Staf Scheirlinckx
    5. Pierrick Fedrigo
    6. Pieter Mertens
    7. David Etxebarria
    8. Jerome Pineau
    9. Thor Hushovd
    10. Stuart O'Grady

    and that of the Trofeo Laigueglia like this:

    11. Filippo Pozzato
    12. Lorenzo Bernucci
    13. Romans Vainsteins
    14. Serhiy Honchar
    15. Luca Paolini
    16. Marcus Zberg
    17. Daniele Pietropolli
    18. Paolo Bossoni
    19. Massimiliano Gentili
    20. Massimo Giunti

    to be indicative of the fact that "Fabrizio" is a
    pathological liar who has never been closer to Italy than
    his local Pizza Hut. If you're going to try to fool some of
    the people some of the time, sonny, you should at least try
    to tell /convincing/ porkies.

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  17. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <xEo8c.84351$1p.1234903@attbi_s54>,
    m..leuck@comcast.net says...
    >
    > Not that I doubt you but why is the LWB slower to get to
    > cruising speed and require less effort once there? I've
    > not found this to be true either way in my experience but
    > my experience isn't as much as yours with the LWB's

    I liken LWBS to 18-wheelers and SWBs to fast Sports Cars.
    Both can exceed the speed limit and commonly cruise the
    interstates between 75 and 80. It takes a while to get get
    that big rig up to speed, but once it gets there, it can
    cruise all day long. The sports car OTOH is doing 80 before
    it leaves the entrance ramp. You've got to keep pumping in
    fuel if you want it to keep going fast.

    I find the same with my Stratus when I had it, slow to
    accelerate yet I could easily cruise 18-20 mph until I met a
    hill. Now with both my SWBs, I'm first away from the light
    and have to keep up the fast pedaling if I want to maintain
    18-20 mph.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager
    http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  18. Legs Thanks for the straight facts Speedy

    Dave Larrington wrote:

    > "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" wrote:
    >
    > > I believe that my recent top ten placing in the Etollie
    > > de Besseges and the Laigueglia allow me the right to ask
    > > you to take back your last statement. Thanks.
    >
    > I, on the other hand, believe that the fact that the top
    > ten of the Etoile de Besseges reads like this:
    >
    > 1. Laurent Brochard
    > 2. Sylvain Calzati
    > 3. Joseba Zubeldia
    > 4. Staf Scheirlinckx
    > 5. Pierrick Fedrigo
    > 6. Pieter Mertens
    > 7. David Etxebarria
    > 8. Jerome Pineau
    > 9. Thor Hushovd
    > 10. Stuart O'Grady
    >
    > and that of the Trofeo Laigueglia like this:
    >
    > 1. Filippo Pozzato
    > 2. Lorenzo Bernucci
    > 3. Romans Vainsteins
    > 4. Serhiy Honchar
    > 5. Luca Paolini
    > 6. Marcus Zberg
    > 7. Daniele Pietropolli
    > 8. Paolo Bossoni
    > 9. Massimiliano Gentili
    > 10. Massimo Giunti
    >
    > to be indicative of the fact that "Fabrizio" is a
    > pathological liar who has never been closer to Italy than
    > his local Pizza Hut. If you're going to try to fool some
    > of the people some of the time, sonny, you should at least
    > try to tell /convincing/ porkies.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    > ===========================================================

    > Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    > http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    > ===========================================================

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the
    World! -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different
    Servers! =-----
     
  19. "Dave Larrington" <legs_larry@yahoo.com> wrote in
    message ...
    >
    > to be indicative of the fact that "Fabrizio" is a
    > pathological liar who has never been closer to Italy than
    > his local Pizza Hut. If you're going to try to fool some
    > of the people some of the time, sonny, you should at least
    > try to tell /convincing/ porkies.

    Say what you will. But you can't take away my 961 UCI
    points.

    Why do you people over there have to slander anyone like
    Fabrizio who make it to the top of their sport? Is it
    because you grew up in that nasty tabloid newspaper
    environment?
     
  20. On Thu, 25 Mar 2004 22:20:01 GMT, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni"
    <chipomarc@lfdd.ca> wrote:

    >
    >Why do you people over there have to slander anyone like
    >Fabrizio who make it to the top of their sport?

    Fabs:

    You're beginning to refer to yourself in the third
    person. Get help.

    (Bob Dole always referred to Bob Dole in the third person.
    And lookit what happened to him...)
     
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