Looking for a basic bike for week-ends

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Pierre-Philippe, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. Hi,

    I have began to look for a basic bike for me to use during week-ends. I will probably spend a couple
    of hours every week-end, no more.

    I've seen several bicycles at various shops just as JJB sports, Argos, Littlewood. They all look
    similar at around 100£.

    Looking at this newsgroup a little bit, I feel that this is not really the sort of budget you are
    looking at... So I would like to know the main differences between a 100£ bike and a 500£ (or more)
    one. Sorry if it looks like a naive question ...

    I quickly tried a few bikes in a JJB-Sports shop and I noticed they were heavy, especially the
    suspensionned ones. All their bikes seemed to be like that however...
     
    Tags:


  2. >Hi,
    >
    >I have began to look for a basic bike for me to use during week-ends. I will probably spend a
    >couple of hours every week-end, no more.
    >
    >I've seen several bicycles at various shops just as JJB sports, Argos, Littlewood. They all look
    >similar at around 100£.
    >
    >Looking at this newsgroup a little bit, I feel that this is not really the sort of budget you are
    >looking at... So I would like to know the main differences between a 100£ bike and a 500£ (or more)
    >one. Sorry if it looks like a naive question ...
    >
    >I quickly tried a few bikes in a JJB-Sports shop and I noticed they were heavy, especially the
    >suspensionned ones. All their bikes seemed to be like that however...

    Before you part with your hard earned cash in any way I suggest you have a long, hard think.

    What kind of cycling will you be doing? On road, off road, mix of two? It makes a difference as to
    what type of bike to get. It matters - to your comfort and to whether you will actually use your
    bike more than a couple of times once you've got it :)

    If you are going to cycle on road, *please* don't get an off-road bike - don't get an MTB - get a
    proper road bike.

    If you are going to cycle off road, *please* don't use a road bike - get an MTB

    I mean, you could use a chieftain tank for driving on road, but they are far more at home on rough
    terrain. You could use a Ferrari off road, but it's much better on the motorway :)

    If you fancy a bit of both types of cycling, consider a hybrid, or (sound of piggy bank being
    emptied) get one of each.

    Basically - get a cheap bike - and that's what you'll get - a cheap bike - probably heavy,
    uncomfortable, crap saddle etc., etc.. and which will quickly put you off cycling.

    Get a halfway decent bike - see local bike shops (LBS), NOT JJB Sports, NOT Argos & the like. Shop
    around. Vist several LBSs - try out different bikes for size etc.

    Also - consider buying a few copies of mags such as Cycling Weekly, Cycling Plus and looking through
    - in the second hand ads etc.. to get an idea of what a decent bike is and how much to pay
    new/second hand. Put it this way, I cycle on road and there's no way, no how I will ever buy a
    £100.00 special from Argos, JJB Sports, or... even from a LBS. They are possibly one of the main
    reasons people buy a bike, use it a couple of times and then they become unused lying in the
    garage/shed :(

    I *used* to have such a bike - I named it the pink peril. It "did". Then I changed it and got a more
    expensive, lighter bike (a hybrid) and my mileages and comfort doubled overnight - I kid you not.
    Now, as I ride on road (don't like off road) I have a Bianchi San Remo. You can tell the difference
    between a £100 special and a proper bike the second you get on a proper one :) The bike I've got
    costs around £850 new, but mine, second-hand a couple of years old cost well less than half of that.
    It is a lovely bike to ride. I *enjoy* cycling - as I enjoy it, I look forward to getting out on the
    bike. There really is a difference between a decent bike and a new cheapie - honest :) Consider
    whether to get a more expensive bike second hand so it comes within your budget. I can dream about a
    Colnago C40, but I can't afford one :)

    Two other things to consider when getting a bike - for personal comfort & enjoyment.

    1. Cycle shorts/pants - with padded bits strategically placed :) I can't emphasise enough how much
    I consider a pair of padded cycle shorts an *essential* bit of kit. Whenever I go for a bike
    ride I always have a pair on (under my leggings) no matter how long or short the ride. Instant
    added comfort
    - no numb bum. I am told that they save a bloke from numb nuts, but being female, I don't have that
    problem :) A numb bum, on the other hand, is not nice and padded cycling shorts work wonders - Can
    pick up a pair from about £9.99 onwards.

    2. Saddle - these are *entirely* individual to the rider as to what is a comfortable saddle and what
    is not. There is a difference between saddles designed for men & women. Once found, a comfy
    saddle is a prized gem and never to be parted with :)

    Hope my ramblings help.

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Pierre-Philippe Ravier wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have began to look for a basic bike for me to use during week-ends. I will probably spend a
    > couple of hours every week-end, no more.

    Hi, If you enjoy it though, you might end up doing a bit more than that. If the bike is rubbish,
    however, you might be put off for life......

    > I've seen several bicycles at various shops just as JJB sports, Argos, Littlewood. They all look
    > similar at around 100£.
    >
    > Looking at this newsgroup a little bit, I feel that this is not really the sort of budget you are
    > looking at... So I would like to know the main differences between a 100£ bike and a 500£ (or
    > more) one. Sorry if it looks like a naive question ...

    No, it's a good question.

    > I quickly tried a few bikes in a JJB-Sports shop and I noticed they were heavy, especially the
    > suspensionned ones. All their bikes seemed to be like that however...

    That is the main obvious difference.Weight. (Their more expensive ones should be comparetively
    lighter). Better bikes will generally easier to ride and more pleasurable. The suspension is
    unncecessary for normal cycling and adds weight and complication, and wastes a lot of the money -
    leaving little money for the frame and basic components. These bikes are astonishingly cheap; toy
    bikes, really. Far cheaper in real terms than bikes cost 5, 10 and 50 years ago. Just one or two
    quite ordinary /components/ can cost as much as one of these whole bikes!! These prices can only be
    achieved by using entirely third world labour and importing in massive bulk.

    The components are unlikely be fully compatible with current good stuff. For example, when you
    eventually need to replace sprockets, you'll have less choice of decent replacements if the bike has
    5, 6 or 7 cogs in the "cassette" instead of 8 or 9 which is basically the modern standard now.

    General quality? It's hard to say exactly and will depend on each model. The cheapo bargain basement
    bikes are improving (it wasn't long ago that cheap bikes had inferior steel rims, now almost all
    have aluminium), but still some of the stuff is rubbish. Gear levers, hubs and cranksets may be
    naff. Frames should be reliable and strong enough, though, but can be very heavy sometimes.

    I would advise either getting a second-hand bike instead (pref with help of an experienced cyclist)
    or try and strike a deal with a proper bike shop - where you'll get better advice than you will from
    the "sports" shops. £250 is more like a reasonable absolute minimum for a new mountain bike (and
    that's pushing it). Also think about other types of bikes as well if riding on road (even though an
    MTB can be fine, especially with road tyres fitted).

    ~PB
     
  4. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 20 Jan 2003 08:37:26 -0800, [email protected] (Pierre-Philippe Ravier) wrote:

    >I have began to look for a basic bike for me to use during week-ends. I will probably spend a
    >couple of hours every week-end, no more. I've seen several bicycles at various shops just as JJB
    >sports, Argos, Littlewood. They all look similar at around 100£.

    Check the used bikes at your local bike shop first - you can often get a better quality bike for the
    same price that way. As has been said before - cheap, strong, light - pick any two.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  5. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Pierre-Philippe Ravier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have began to look for a basic bike for me to use during week-ends. I will probably spend a
    > couple of hours every week-end, no more.
    >
    > I've seen several bicycles at various shops just as JJB sports, Argos, Littlewood. They all look
    > similar at around 100£.
    >
    > Looking at this newsgroup a little bit, I feel that this is not really the sort of budget you are
    > looking at... So I would like to know the main differences between a 100£ bike and a 500£ (or
    > more) one. Sorry if it looks like a naive question ...
    >
    > I quickly tried a few bikes in a JJB-Sports shop and I noticed they were heavy, especially the
    > suspensionned ones. All their bikes seemed to be like that however...

    As racer type bikes aren't currently the fashion, and, if you will only be riding on roads, it's
    well worth looking for second-hand ones in your local press. I bought a beaut for £40 last year,
    have done plenty of miles on it, love cycling and feel it was £40 well spent. I saw one last week
    that was described as excellent condition for £15!! - almost disposable, use once, sling it!!.
    However, if you are doing any off-roading, upto canal towpath type riding, then a cheap hybrid is
    not a bad option, although that statement will not be to everyone's taste. Again, I lost my driving
    licence a few years ago and came back to cycling after 20 years off. I was as confused as hell as
    the options have changed no end since I used to be a cyclist! I bought a cheap Universal cycle,
    cheap import put together in this country. No suspension but the components are not too bad, ali
    wheels, shimano V-brakes and gears, not top of the range, but sufficient, oh, and a cromoly frame.
    Plastic pedals that I swapped almost immediately. Off-road tyres that I eventually changed to
    60/40's for less drag on-road. I used it for 6 months with no problems, then went back to the car.
    Because I'd enjoyed the cycling so much, I decided to do a triathlon to ensure I kept up cycling
    once the driving recommenced. I trained hard and completed the triathlon, all on this bike. I still
    use it where circumstances demand. These bikes can be bought for around £100 new and personally, I
    think are very good value for money. They may well be cheaper now, this was in '98. Alternately they
    may have better components. If you are likely to be 'playing off-road' at all then you'll be into
    suspension bikes. There are entry level front sus bikes at £250-£300 new that are very competent,
    then you get into full suspension varieties for downhill and cross country. These are specialist
    areas and I doubt they are what you are after at the moment. Later maybe ;-). Remember, you can save
    money by buying second hand from either your LBS or privately. Alternately going for last years
    models can result in great discounts and I believe this is just about the right time of year to be
    looking out for this kind of deal. Don't be afraid to ask the experts, they love it. And don't be
    afraid to shop around and make sure you get the bike that's right for you. Might be worth getting
    sized up at your local bike shop to ensure you buy the right sized bike as this is VERY IMPORTANT.
    Hope this helps, Dave.
     
  6. W K

    W K Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > If you are going to cycle on road, *please* don't get an off-road bike -
    don't
    > get an MTB - get a proper road bike.

    If he's going to pay out less than £300 he hasn't got much choice. At this price level a slicked up
    rigid MTB or some sort of hybrid is OK.

    By "a proper road bike" you mean a road racing bike really don't you -they are designed round some
    rather specific criteria and for many purposes I'd prefer a bit more comfort - if only the ability
    to fit 28mm tyres etc.
     
  7. Peter Simons

    Peter Simons Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    >

    > I would advise either getting a second-hand bike instead (pref with help of an experienced
    > cyclist) or try and strike a deal with a proper bike shop - where you'll get better advice than
    > you will from the "sports" shops. £250 is more like a reasonable absolute minimum for a new
    > mountain bike (and that's pushing it).

    No sure at 250 you should be able to get a reasoble bike as long as you do not mind having last
    years model and it being very basic I.E no supsension.

    For an example at 265 http://www.dawescycles.com/Bikes/discovery301.htm

    Peter
     
  8. Terry J

    Terry J Guest

    > Check the used bikes at your local bike shop first - you can often get a better quality bike for
    > the same price that way. As has been said before - cheap, strong, light - pick any two.

    I am riding a claude butler hybrid which has suspension forks( unnecessary, heavy and give the
    steering a slightly vague fee compared with rigid) and cost about £225 last year being the previous
    year's model.I know it'll do 80miles a day with heavy panniers on and is good on towpaths (when I
    appreciate the suspension a bit) or roads .The soft ,deep saddle was painful after 1/2hr so I
    changed it for a liberator copy.I expect wheels and other bits to wear out relatively quickly and
    will upgrade.

    I called in the bike shop at Llandrindod Wells recently and he had much choice of good value 2nd
    hand bikes.Old 5speed racers and shoppers go for peanuts and a good one would be all one needs for
    knocking about . TerryJ
     
  9. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Dave wrote:

    > As racer type bikes aren't currently the fashion

    AFAICT they're fashionable again. So we've gone from Mr. and Mrs. J=20 Public and their children
    using one sort of inappropriate bike for=20 general cycling (knobbly equipped overweight
    off-roaders) to another=20 (relatively uncomfortable machines with no luggage capacity)...

    > and, if you will only be riding on roads, it's well worth looking for second-hand ones in your l=
    ocal
    > press.=20

    Second hand is a very good option on just about any sort of bike.

    > However, if you are doing any off-roading, upto canal towpath type ridi=
    ng,
    > then a cheap hybrid is not a bad option, although that statement will n=
    ot be
    > to everyone's taste.

    Up to canal tow path riding you can use anything you want: they're flat, =

    go in relatively straight lines and tend to be smooth, and are actually=20 no worse to ride on than
    a cobbled street (often rather better, in fact!)=
    =2E
    "Cheap" is a relative term, my idea and someone else's may be entirely=20 different. But I'd say you
    can spend =A3200 on a new machine (the=20 relevant Dawes or Ridgeback, for example) and get a
    comfortable, well=20 specced, well designed machine with sensibly selected components that'll =

    do just about anything you're likely to want to do outside of serious=20 rough stuff or racing. I'd
    say they're a good choice as a pure road=20 machine. Unless you're doing serious rough stuff there's
    no particular need for=20 any suspension. At this sort of price level the money will IMHO be=20
    better spent on things like better frame, transmission and brakes. And=20 mudguards and a luggage
    rack and some panniers.

    > If you are likely to be 'playing off-road' at all then you'll be into suspension bikes.=20

    Depends on one's idea of "off road"... An awful lot of very serious=20 cycling has been done on
    rigid MTBs, and there's plenty of hybrids that=20 are (a) rigid) and (b) *easily* capable of doing
    far rougher stuff than=20 a tow path: the Roughstuff Fellowship, one of the original off road=20
    clubs, was doing serious off road years before suspension and even MTBs=20 existed.

    Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
    Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  10. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter wrote:

    > If you are going to cycle on road, *please* don't get an off-road bike - don't get an MTB - get a
    > proper road bike.

    Good point, but note that "road bike" is a rather nebulous term. Some folk, probably including the
    folk you might ask for "a road bike" in a shop, take it to mean nothing but racing machinery.
    Probably not the best thing for a general purpose bike as they're relatively uncomfortable, have
    narrow gear ratios that require experience (muscular and knowledge-based) to get the most out of,
    can't carry bags on the bike and rarely have mudguards to help keep you dry. Great fun if you just
    want to get from A to B (or just a big loop back to A) as quickly as possible on a nice day with no
    baggage, but for anything else, not terribly useful IMHO. The rest of us take "road bike" to mean
    bikes designed for road use: I think that's what Helen's getting at. Note that many hybrids are
    really "road bikes" in this sense, the MTB aspect being the riding position more than anything else.

    > If you are going to cycle off road, *please* don't use a road bike - get an MTB

    Depends on the "off-road", and whether you'll be using the roads too. If you're just popping along
    the odd forest trail at no great speed you don't need any specialised machinery and it's unlikely to
    be worth your while compromising the road performance for. As kids we used to spend ages riding
    through rivers and round woods on crap Raleigh "racers", Choppers etc., all technically completely
    unsuitable for the job, but we did it just fine anyway... Only if you're travelling large distances
    and/or at speed offroad and/or getting into serious terrain requiring knobbly tyres is an MTB really
    worth your while IMHO.

    > 1. Cycle shorts/pants - with padded bits strategically placed :) I can't emphasise enough how much
    > I consider a pair of padded cycle shorts an *essential* bit of kit. Whenever I go for a bike
    > ride I always have a pair on (under my leggings) no matter how long or short the ride.

    I never bother on short trips. Just more of a faff and more laundry (they generally work best
    without underpants, btw) add up to not really worth the bother. If you've got a fair saddle then a
    short trip shouldn't need *any* special clothing. Longer trips I'll happily recommend them too.

    > 2. Saddle - these are *entirely* individual to the rider as to what is a comfortable saddle and
    > what is not. There is a difference between saddles designed for men & women. Once found, a
    > comfy saddle is a prized gem and never to be parted with :)

    Yup, Yup, and indeed thrice yup. Note that one thing you almost certainly won't get on a cheap bike
    is a decent saddle. 20 miles on one of those and you'll start to wonder if you'll ever walk
    again... ;-/

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  11. [email protected] (wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter) wrote
    > >I have began to look for a basic bike for me to use during week-ends. I will probably spend a
    > >couple of hours every week-end, no more.
    > >
    > >I've seen several bicycles at various shops just as JJB sports, Argos, Littlewood. They all look
    > >similar at around 100£.

    Those 100 quid wonders are not only heavy, but they are made with such cheap and low-quality
    components that it will be difficult to keep in good working order. They will deter you from riding,
    and if your main goal is to get out and get some exercise and fresh air on the weekends, it won't
    serve you well.

    I suggest a bike between 200 and 300 quid. You certainly could spend 500 quid or more (heck, I've
    even spent 500 quid on a used bike, a quality full-suspension Marin MTB) but for a beginner I
    don't think it's really necessary to spend that much money. A cheaper one will do you fine to
    begin with, and if you find it doesn't meet your needs you can either replace parts until it does,
    or buy a new one.

    > Before you part with your hard earned cash in any way I suggest you have a long, hard think.
    >
    > What kind of cycling will you be doing? On road, off road, mix of two? It makes a difference as to
    > what type of bike to get. It matters - to your comfort and to whether you will actually use your
    > bike more than a couple of times once you've got it :)

    Agreed!

    >
    > If you are going to cycle on road, *please* don't get an off-road bike - don't get an MTB - get a
    > proper road bike.

    Hmmmmm. Actually, a good-quality rigid MTB with slick tires, mudguards, and a rack makes an
    excellent bike for riding on road. If if were easy to find good quality rigid MTBs, I would suggest
    that this would be a good bike to buy. However, most MTBs nowadays come with suspension which is not
    very useful for road riding (although a suspension seat post is nice, but cheap and easy to fit
    afterwards).

    I'm not exactly sure what you mean by road bikes. Do you mean stripped down racers, or are you
    including tourers in this category? Either way, you surely mean a bike with dropped bars. I would
    suggest that the OP not buy a bike with dropped bars, as they are not very beginner-friendly, unless
    he can get a really cheap used one that he won't feel bad about selling on if he doesn't get along
    with it. True enough that drop bars are the preferred choice of people who like to ride really long
    distances (like Audax rides), but not the choice of people who tend to ride shorter distances, who
    prefer the simplicity of having the more upright position that come automatically with straight
    bars, and the easy reach to shirters and brakes. Even for touring, where one typically rides 50
    miles a day over hill and dale carrying luggage, straight bar bikes are quite popular. So don't
    assume that because you like drop bars, that they are appropriate for everyone!

    > If you are going to cycle off road, *please* don't use a road bike - get an MTB

    This is a fair enough comment, but even then there are exceptions -- cyclocross racers who ride
    modified road bike offroad! But I wouldn't recommend this to a beginner.

    > If you fancy a bit of both types of cycling, consider a hybrid, or (sound of piggy bank being
    > emptied) get one of each.

    In my opinion, for a beginner, a hybrid is exactly what he should be buying. It's fairly easy to
    find good quality rigid hybrids in the right price range (see the Dawes and Ridgeback range). They
    can be easily fitted with mudguards & racks, and they are comfy for shorter distances, and when
    fitted with bar ends for a change of hand position can be good for much longer distances.

    > Basically - get a cheap bike - and that's what you'll get - a cheap bike - probably heavy,
    > uncomfortable, crap saddle etc., etc.. and which will quickly put you off cycling.
    >
    > Get a halfway decent bike - see local bike shops (LBS), NOT JJB Sports, NOT Argos & the like. Shop
    > around. Vist several LBSs - try out different bikes for size etc.

    Absolutely!

    > 1. Cycle shorts/pants - with padded bits strategically placed :) I can't emphasise enough how much
    > I consider a pair of padded cycle shorts an *essential* bit of kit. Whenever I go for a bike
    > ride I always have a pair on (under my leggings) no matter how long or short the ride. Instant
    > added comfort
    > - no numb bum. I am told that they save a bloke from numb nuts, but being female, I don't have
    > that problem :) A numb bum, on the other hand, is not nice and padded cycling shorts work
    > wonders - Can pick up a pair from about £9.99 onwards.

    I don't think special bike shorts/pants are necessary or all that useful for rides shorter than
    about 10 miles. If you get into long-distance riding, though, they are pretty much essenital.

    > 2. Saddle - these are *entirely* individual to the rider as to what is a comfortable saddle and
    > what is not. There is a difference between saddles designed for men & women. Once found, a
    > comfy saddle is a prized gem and never to be parted with :)

    This couldn't be more true. This may be the most difficult aspect of cycling, finding a saddle that
    suits your bum shape. But you may be lucky and not have such a picky bum! If you find a saddle you
    really get on with, buy several! That way if they stop making them, you'll have a stash for when
    they break or get the covers ripped, as sometimes happens.

    -Myra
     
  12. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    > I don't think special bike shorts/pants are necessary or all that useful for rides shorter than
    > about 10 miles. If you get into long-distance riding, though, they are pretty much essenital.

    I would still encourage beginners to get some cycling shorts (needn't be expensive ones). I don't
    always bother wearing them for short local rides but always feel more comfortable when I do - even
    for just 5 miles.

    ~PB
     
  13. W K

    W K Guest

    "Myra VanInwegen" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Hmmmmm. Actually, a good-quality rigid MTB with slick tires, mudguards, and a rack makes an
    > excellent bike for riding on road. If if were easy to find good quality rigid MTBs, I would
    > suggest that this would be a good bike to buy. However, most MTBs nowadays come with
    > suspension ...

    Indeed, theres only one or two left, but I have seen a fully slicked and racked specialized hardrock
    '02 locked up on some railings. In a couple of years there may well be no new bikes at all to do
    this with.

    If its possible to find something a few years old, it could have decent bits and pieces on it. [As a
    minimum spec I'd hope for 7 speed cassette and not freewheel, not SiS, named V or canti brakes]
    Whatever direction the OP might go in cycling, such a bike is useful for popping to the shops, a few
    miles etc.etc.
     
  14. Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:
    >AFAICT they're fashionable again. So we've gone from Mr. and Mrs. J= Public and their children
    >using one sort of inappropriate bike for general cycling (knobbly equipped overweight off-roaders)
    >to another (relatively uncomfortable machines with no luggage capacity)...

    Gaspipe full-suspension clunkers don't have any luggage capacity either. I don't think much of
    Lance-fantasy bikes for general purpose use, but I think it's an improvement.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  15. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    > I would still encourage beginners to get some cycling shorts (needn't be expensive ones). I don't
    > always bother wearing them for short local rides but always feel more comfortable when I do - even
    > for just 5 miles.

    But comfort isn't always the first priority, often it's a minimum of fuss. And having to change
    clothes before you go out isn't a minimum of fuss (or in my case having to get the 'bent out of the
    garage, change into special shoes and worry about security at the other end isn't a minimum of fuss,
    so hang the comfort and take the Brommie).

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  16. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    David Damerell wrote:

    > Gaspipe full-suspension clunkers don't have any luggage capacity either. I don't think much of
    > Lance-fantasy bikes for general purpose use, but I think it's an improvement.

    Fair point: at least they're good at *something*.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  17. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Pete Biggs wrote:
    >
    >> I would still encourage beginners to get some cycling shorts (needn't be expensive ones). I don't
    >> always bother wearing them for short local rides but always feel more comfortable when I do -
    >> even for just 5 miles.
    >
    > But comfort isn't always the first priority, often it's a minimum of fuss. And having to change
    > clothes before you go out isn't a minimum of fuss (or in my case having to get the 'bent out of
    > the garage, change into special shoes and worry about security at the other end isn't a minimum of
    > fuss, so hang the comfort and take the Brommie).

    Of course. You may not always want to wear them, but get some anyway to try, is my advice.

    BTW, you are assuming that one always has to _change_ before donning cycling shorts. If going out
    straight after getting out of bed/shower, however, ......... :)

    ~PB
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, pLime {remove_fruit}@biggs.tc says...

    > BTW, you are assuming that one always has to _change_ before donning cycling shorts. If going out
    > straight after getting out of bed/shower, however, ......... :)

    You mean you don't put on a lounge suit, shirt, and tie, immediately after bathing and before
    changing into working clothes?

    Colin
     
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